Malari Registered User
#526

Ruralyoke said:
don't get it?


I think it refers to people who prounounce the word "police" as "plice" instead of "pole-iss"

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Ruralyoke Closed Account
#527

D'oh - of course

bluewolf being awesome
#528

i kept reading it as "plyce" and wondered

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Ruralyoke Closed Account
#529

bluewolf said:
i kept reading it as "plyce" and wondered


Me too.

And for some reason thought of Bowie (I'm a huge fan) saying the word "place" in one of his many wonderful tracks.

Then I realised I was more likely thinking of "fice" (for face)

true-or-false Registered User
#530

I'm 99% sure I've seen this said already, but I just have to vent.

Folly. Follied.

One of my relations says folly instead of follow, follied instead of followed, and she manages to work it into conversation every time I talk to her. It drives me nuts.

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girl2 Registered User
#531

My granny calls cappuccino - cappatino.

uch Registered User
#532

Too lazy to read the rest of the posts but I'm from Dublin and I hate the word Yisser, as in "get yisser flags"

up for anything Registered User
#533

My ex always used the word capture instead of caption no matter how many times I corrected him. In the end it made me spit silently.

I was just down at the petrol station and a woman asked me for directions to Clonmel. I explained the roundabouts and the ring road (long way round but easiest for a stranger) and she repeated them to me to make sure she had them right and kept saying right at the first ringabout and then about 6 ringabouts and left at the last ringabout. It made me laugh.

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girl2 Registered User
#534

up for anything said:
My ex always used the word capture instead of caption no matter how many times I corrected him. In the end it made me spit silently.

I was just down at the petrol station and a woman asked me for directions to Clonmel. I explained the roundabouts and the ring road (long way round but easiest for a stranger) and she repeated them to me to make sure she had them right and kept saying right at the first ringabout and then about 6 ringabouts and left at the last ringabout. It made me laugh.


That made me laugh too!

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LH Pathe Closed Account
#535

My 'pal', seems to pronounces every E before R as a U on tenturhooks that fella

/no it's an emphasis thing. Like surve oh; yeah I'd like to serve him one

forfuxsake Registered User
#536

Sea Filly said:
Yeah, I don't think 'gotten' is wrong and pretty much all Irish people (me included) I know seem to use it, but it's not really "correct". But saying "I've got" sound strange to me. 'Gotten' is definitely less common in the UK.


gotten is US English and got UK.

I always use got now but I am pretty sure I used gotten before a stint as an English teacher.

Sea Filly Closed Account
#537

forfuxsake said:
gotten is US English and got UK.

I always use got now but I am pretty sure I used gotten before a stint as an English teacher.


Yeah, it blew my mind a few years ago to discover than 'gotten' is technically wrong. It sounds so right!

Sea Filly Closed Account
#538

girl2 said:
My granny calls cappuccino - cappatino.


Ah, that's kinda cute.

Qualitymark Closed Account
#539

'Louth' and 'Meath' pronounced with a soft 'th', so 'Louth' rhymes with 'mouth'; I think this comes from English broadcasters - there's a Louth in England that is correctly pronounced like this, but Louth and Meath in Ireland should be, and always have been until now, pronounced with a hard 'th' as in the word 'the'.

Had to laugh at 'cappatino'. Joyce got a dig in at Gogarty when he had stately plump Buck Mulligan joyously saying 'Thalatta' in Ulysses (which was itself always pronounced 'You-LISS-aze' until the 1970s, when it morphed into 'YOU-liss-aze'); thalassa is Greek for 'sea' and was the joyous cry of the retreating Greeks when they spotted their home ocean after fleeing from Persian nasties; thalatta is a foamy coffee drink.

pickarooney Moderator
#540

Technically, it's obsolete (in the UK).

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