#211

One good reason I like being thinner is that I just feel more comfortable, if that makes sense. I didn't like having a big tummy, or feeling blown-up and bloated or not being able to see my cheekbones.

1 person has thanked this post
Wibbs Je suis un Rock star
#212

D-gal this is hardly an appropriate thread for your post. Even more it's very close to shilling. No more please. Post deleted

1 person has thanked this post
Little My Registered User
#213

Not sure if this has been linked to already but it is definitely worth a read if not.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2012/jun/10/body-image-anxiety-eva-wiseman?fb=native&CMP=FBCNETTXT9038

1 person has thanked this post
mood Registered User
#214

No I don't want to be thinner. I wouldn't mind being a bit bigger.

MissMoppet Registered User
#215

I want to be thinner to feel better about my body.

1 person has thanked this post
#216

I lost over 8.5 stone for health reasons, but now that I've put back nearly two stone of that it's more about liking how I used to look - saggy skin and all - and wanting to fit back into the nice clothes I've accumulated since I reached my goal. When I was morbidly obese I wasn't all that bothered until I had to dress up for something, so health was the only motivation strong enough to make me take action. Now it has become mostly vanity, LOL, though I seem to have regained mostly around my waist which is particularly unhealthy as well.

A neighbour commented in passing this morning that she barely recognises me any more, and all I wanted to do was stop and tell her that I'm only barely fitting in jeans two sizes larger than what she last saw me wearing. I suppose it's a good lesson in others seeing us differently than we see ourselves.

1 person has thanked this post
PrincessLola Registered User
#217

cuilteanna said:
I lost over 8.5 stone for health reasons, but now that I've put back nearly two stone of that it's more about liking how I used to look - saggy skin and all - and wanting to fit back into the nice clothes I've accumulated since I reached my goal. When I was morbidly obese I wasn't all that bothered until I had to dress up for something, so health was the only motivation strong enough to make me take action. Now it has become mostly vanity, LOL, though I seem to have regained mostly around my waist which is particularly unhealthy as well.

A neighbour commented in passing this morning that she barely recognises me any more, and all I wanted to do was stop and tell her that I'm only barely fitting in jeans two sizes larger than what she last saw me wearing. I suppose it's a good lesson in others seeing us differently than we see ourselves.


You're still 6.5 stone lighter than you were, thats great

Regaining weight after weight loss is a huge problem, in my experiene its harder to keep weight off than lose it in the first place, because when you gain weight you gain extra fat cells, and those fat cells don't disappear when you lose it again, they just shrink.

1 person has thanked this post
gjc Registered User
#218

I need to lose weight as I have a cholesterol level of 10 (age 39), believe me I am not fat perhaps I should lose 1 stone, but I have it in my head that losing a stone will help, gp recognises that im not overweight in fact average weight for my age (he said that he has patients that are as thin as whipets with high cholesterol and patients who are 20 stone with spot on cholesterol) i'm on tablets...yet I feel I need to lose it...finding it very very hard to shift the weight

kanedaly60 Registered User
#219

I'm not sure how to describe my relationship with my weight.

From the age of about 7 I had body image issues. I was an average slim child, but I felt self conscious in shorts and uncovered arms. I remember telling my mother I would get lipo on my thighs as a child.

I lost a lot of weight when I hit my teens. First unconsiously, then I stopped eating and developed bulima. I am attractive and got attention from boys and it spiraled. Then at some point I started binge eating and since then I've see-sawed between the two.

In the last two years I improved a lot. I exercise, and I don't act so drastically regarding my weight. I looked well and I felt comfortable for the first time in years.

I can't deal with stress and a breakup and college exams/sudden unemployment have made me recently gain a stone rapidly, through comfort eating. I now dress differently, feel differently, and isolate myself a bit socially. My boyfriend loves me but I don't feel as comfortable with him looking at my body anymore. I know my problem is being lazy and eating too much refined carbs, but I have yet to break the habit.

Basically as other posters have stated I want to be thinner to make myself feel more comfortable, and I think my weight has a knock on effect on my socialiblity, my relationships and how I present myself. It has a direct impact on my self worth.

2 people have thanked this post
Princess Peach Registered User
#220

I want to bring up a point here that I found from the "plus size women" thread, don't want to drag that off topic. It's about the gender issues regarding weight loss.

Wibbs said that he has lost weight and not having been overweight there were negative comments made about it. Now if an average weight girl loses weight, for whatever reason, normally the comments are positive. Say a size 12 girl falls to a size 8, most people will compliment her. It's usually not until someone becomes underweight that concerns are raised.

Seems a lot more acceptable for women than men, even though in either case there could be health or mental issues involved. Maybe because generally women buy into the media more? I'm thinking of magazines here. Every womens magazine has a diet page, but apart from mens fitness magazines the likes of GQ do not focus on mens physical appearance.

Just makes me wonder is it the culture among women that fuels the media, bringing it full circle, or is it the media fuelling women? And why is it not so prevalent among men?

1 person has thanked this post
#221

I don't know. I my best male friend is battling his weight since I remember, my brother who used to be a bit overweight is an expert on any kind of a diet. The horror when he saw me eating crisps with a sandwich once! My BF is also very self-concuss regarding his weight issues. The only man that I know who is not is my father and he should be. I have a lot of male friends and I wouldn't say my weight issues would be any worse than theirs. Only people don't necessary notice if man gains or loses half a stone, the weight gain or loss usually has to be bigger. And sometimes the issues have more to do with body definition and not actual weight.

#222

Yes, but if a man loses too much weight it's often commented on negatively (unless he was obviously overweight to start with). Female weight loss is almost always commented on positively in my experience, whether she needed to lose it or not.

1 person has thanked this post
#223

Dolorous said:
Yes, but if a man loses too much weight it's often commented on negatively (unless he was obviously overweight to start with). Female weight loss is almost always commented on positively in my experience, whether she needed to lose it or not.


"Ideal" female size is probably comparably smaller than male but I heard comments being made for men and women. I know a girl who is constantly compared to dried up prune behind her back and she is size 8. And I think that can be the main difference, a lot more comments about girls are made behind their back while men are told stuff into their face (by their friends).

Raspberries Registered User
#224

I'm going to preface this post by stating that I haven't read the whole thread.
If someone asked me the question 'why do you want to be thinner?' in the street, I would say that it's for me, and no-one else.

But that's a lie. I want to be slimmer because I don't want to be the 'fat' friend anymore, I don't want to be passed over in a nightclub, I want people to look at me and think, wow she's got a great figure! I want people to say, have you lost weight?

I know, stupid reasons. But I do want to be slimmer for more important reasons too. I am overweight for my height. I am carrying my weight across my middle, which is unhealthy as research states that it could cause heart problems, diabetes, etc. There is a history of diabetes in my family on both sides, so statistically I am very likely to develop it if I don't look after myself. There are also issues with obesity, blood pressure and heart problems in my family so I don't want to put myself at risk of these problems too through my own laziness and greed.

I don't think of it as wanting to be thin though. I think that I need to eat healthier and being more active. I have started to become more active, and that is a big step for me. And I am enjoying it, which is surprising, because I thought I would have to force myself to do it!

2 people have thanked this post
Stheno Contrary voice
#225

Princess Peach said:
I want to bring up a point here that I found from the "plus size women" thread, don't want to drag that off topic. It's about the gender issues regarding weight loss.

Wibbs said that he has lost weight and not having been overweight there were negative comments made about it. Now if an average weight girl loses weight, for whatever reason, normally the comments are positive. Say a size 12 girl falls to a size 8, most people will compliment her. It's usually not until someone becomes underweight that concerns are raised.

Seems a lot more acceptable for women than men, even though in either case there could be health or mental issues involved. Maybe because generally women buy into the media more? I'm thinking of magazines here. Every womens magazine has a diet page, but apart from mens fitness magazines the likes of GQ do not focus on mens physical appearance.

Just makes me wonder is it the culture among women that fuels the media, bringing it full circle, or is it the media fuelling women? And why is it not so prevalent among men?

I had this recently to my face and by comments to my other half, that I had gone from being acceptably thin, to unhealthily skinny

Comments ranged from (to him) "is she sick/has she a problem to (to me) "Are you ok, you look awful and have lost a lot of weight/are very pale, look very tired"

I was getting over a very stressful time in work and the death of a close relative, I was eating at least three times a day, but obviously stress played a part.

I suppose the best I can say here is that there is a tipping point for people being overweight or underweight (strangely enough I'm not underweight, bmi is 19.5) where it's acceptable to pass remarks if that makes any sense, regardless of trauma, stress, underlying illness etc, and it doesn't matter if your too fat or too thin, once you are outside someones norm they will comment.

Not being someone who reads anything other than the normal papers on a day to day basis, usually for politics/economics, I've no idea if the media influence it, but it appeared my weight loss (about a stone I guess, I don't know what I weigh and how much I lost) triggered others to feel they could comment ad nauseum

1 person has thanked this post

Want to share your thoughts?

Login here to discuss!