Wild Bill Banned
#16

Oldtree said:


with minds greater than yours or mine:



Speak for only yerself Kemosabe

A cultish fetish is still a cultist fetish no matter how large the cult. "Native" is a daft, destructive, deranged, doomed and dangerous construct once extended beyond any plant or animal born in a location.

As I said - nearly any plant "native" to Britain is as fit to be considered part of similar natural local ecosystems here as any that crossed the land-bridge in the brief period of it's existence.

(and many beyond Britain, natch, though not necessarily including the Jap bindweed)

Anyway, this native butterfly babe magnet, the Buddie Bush, is bursting out all over. (Though this plant is usually amongst the earliest starters in any year)

Oldtree Registered User
#17

"native" to Britain

Apologies! I took umbridge cause I thought you meant Irish natives.

Convolvulus (bindweed) is native to europe and asia, wheras Japanese knotweed is native to east asia.

I had a small garden when I lived in London and bindweed was the bane of my life. In the end I found the best control for it was to allow it to grow up a bamboo cane and then loveingly paint on a systemic weed killer onto the leaves, while wearing gloves, and spent the next few weeks watching it dry out and blow away untill the next ingress.

Buddleia used to grow everywhere esp along the train tracks and I used to notice it also growing on the sides of buildings, its from the Caribbean.

Wild Bill Banned
#18

Some native and blow-in ivy on the wall - just in the past 24 hours the ivy has started bud-burst in every nook and cranny....

Wild Bill Banned
#19

And some native beech bursts bud on Paddy's Day

Wild Bill Banned
#20

Meanwhile, this native pine, which I'm sure you can identify (), is still resting...

Oldtree Registered User
#21

Quite the avid photographer then Wild Bill

Ivy been flowering for a while now. I understand that verregation is due to a virus and the lighter parts of the leaf do not photosynthasize properly thus a weaker plant.

Just finished pruning my lovely beech hedge out the front last week, both green and purple.

See here for pine id (looks like needles in 2's and twisted):

http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/attachment.php?attachmentid=188943&d=1326919863

from this thread as "conifer id and color key" attachment on third post:

http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2056521677

looks like scots pine

Wild Bill Banned
#22

Oldtree said:


looks like scots pine


Nope. It's not Scottish atall atall - it's the native lodgepole pine

Are you saying my ivy is diseased?

Wild Bill Banned
#23

Oldtree said:
Quite the avid photographer then Wild Bill



Well, this thread is about bursting buds!

Here is an apple tree at 10am this very morning....

Wild Bill Banned
#24

On the subject of my allegedly diseased ivy

This was from my wee forest at the same time the other pic was taken....this morning....



Up here, this is the way ivy looks after bud-burst every year - I should know, there is a lot of ivy in the woods around here

(This ivy is growing up a the warm bark of a × Cupressocyparis leylandii - a tree more affectionately known as merely Laylandii by xenophobic anti-plant-immigrants )

Oldtree Registered User
#25

Wild Bill said:
Nope. It's not Scottish atall atall - it's the native lodgepole pine


I sit corrected and blame the photograph

Wild Bill said:
Are you saying my ivy is diseased?


The ivy on the right seems to have a central verrigation on the leaf and yes in my eyes verigation is a disease, but you bought it like that.


What settings do you use on the camera for the up close pics, they are very vivid and clear. I have aful problems with the auto focus making its own mind up. And how do you put pics into a post (cant figure that out either)?

Wild Bill Banned
#26

I didn't buy the variegated holly - that was herself indoors!

Actually - now that you tweaked my interest in close-up photos I must admit all I do is set my 35mm lens on a Canon to the "flower" icon; hold the thing as steady as I can - and shoot!

I notice the results have an extremely narrow focal depth and was going to check out how to get maybe a few inches in focus from close up - I'll need to study it.

To post photos here load them to http://photobucket.com/ (you'll need to sign up - it's free) and then you can copy a code that allows you paste them into your post.

Back to the buds, below is some holly growing on the forest floor under the canopy of assorted native hardwoods - it's taken from further back than the bud shots and all the leaves on the top whorl are in focus.

When I zoom in on the bud the leave pointing at me goes out of focus - I'm sure there is a technique/lens/something to get over this but I damned if I know what it is



The bud above looked ready to rock'n'roll when this was taken on 11th March but I'm still waiting for the first flush of new holly leaf anywhere around here

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Oldtree Registered User
#27

Holly can wait on the forest follr for over 40 years to get going.

I have had the same problem so I dont zoom in anymore just move the camera closer to the subject, moving back and forth to get the focus, this really helps with very close up stuff. the automatic settings have a mind of their own and the depth of field or lighting adjusts to where over 50% of the photo is at ie if over 50% of photo is sky it will use light settings for that making the landscape much darker, so in this case I try to get more than 50% of the photo as landscape.

Wild Bill Banned
#28

When may we see the first Oldtree photos?

The buds will all be burst if you don't get a move on!

Wild Bill Banned
#29

On the woodland floor as well as profuse saplings of holly and ash (especially) and cherry (in the more open areas) I've found this horror

What is it? (looks like some sort of laurel)

I've pulled it up bar one patch where I'm letting it grow, basically, to see what it is.

Oldtree Registered User
#30

its laurel, divel to control.

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