ScumLord Moderator
#16

jameverywhere said:

For large things like deer and cattle, you need the proper tools, like. And of course technique. Unless you're planning on just hacking a steak-sized piece from the side of the cow and roastin' it over a fire?

trust me, ain't as easy as it seems.
I'm sure it's not, we in the west tend to live in ignorance of basic survival skills. You don't need specific tools, people have been eating large animals long before they had the specific tools so you can make do.

I know the basics of gutting things. Take the guts out, but it may take some trial and error. Although I know enough butchers and people that have worked in abattoirs to let them do that work.

Doc Ruby Registered User
#17

degrassinoel said:
Could ye link us the topic? wouldnt mind seeing it and well yeah.. i'm a lazy git

Sure, here's the thread:
http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2056435301

the post:
http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showpost.php?p=75369364&postcount=21

and the pics:









So, these two molle pouches, high grade commercial, go on your belt. Contained within them is the following:
Food bag:
  • Medical supplies
  • rubber gloves
  • water filter (good for around 6 weeks with charcoal, you need that for non bios)
  • bogroll
  • chocolate rations with salt, sugar, pepper and various other condiments
  • platypus water bag as part of the purification system (dirty water->platypus->filter->kelly kettle)
  • water purification tabs (wouldn't use these normally, but they came free with something)
  • 9 days emergency lifeboat rations if you're on the move, two weeks otherwise. They taste a bit like lemon meringue, and I cannot tell you how tired it is possible to get of lemon meringue, so I recommend mixing or crumbling them into coffee or something else after a while. Anything else. Seriously, you start looking speculatively at the moss growing on rocks.

Utility bag:

  • Multitool
  • Cotton pads for firestarting
  • waterproof NATO matches in a sealed container
  • firesteel heavy
  • waterproof container for normal matches, with lighting strip
  • sapwood wrapped in tinfoil for kindling
  • a couple of bic lighters
  • a few commercial firestarter kindlings
  • tampons for firestarting purposes
  • a pencil stub
  • those three round things are towels packed really tightly
  • anti insect spray
  • superglue
  • three applejack sweets, my favourite
  • two plastic clips for sealing things
  • SAS survival guide, mostly good but some of it is nonsense, be advised
  • duct tape
  • a secondary water filter good for six weeks, with spare filters
  • dual purpose knife sharpener
  • roll of 550 paracord
  • roll of brass wire
  • fishing kit
  • wind up torch
  • storm whistle
  • dedicated signalling mirror with folded tinfoil packed beside it
  • sewing kit
  • compass
  • a dozen safety pins stapled inside the bag
  • all weather emergency blanket
  • greased wiresaw wrapped in greaseproof paper wrapped in tissue

Not pictured, Brunton stormproof lighter which I use in my everyday routine. I'm thinking about adding some jerky as well. Oops forgot 36 hour Dunne stores candle, and spork. Also I'd normally pack vitamin pills at the top of the food bag, but they have a low shelf life so I just use them as I go. I've since added a folding saw and a couple of petrol lighters (NOT zippo).

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degrassinoel Assume the position
#18

that is brilliant! Nice one

Curious though, did you get everything locally or from across the pond?

Doc Ruby Registered User
#19

degrassinoel said:
that is brilliant! Nice one

Curious though, did you get everything locally or from across the pond?

All sorts of places, the two main ones would be red flare kits and dealextreme though. Also the Great Outdoors supplied me with a few bits and bobs, ah loads of sources built up over time.

There's a good bit more kit than is shown there as well, I picked up a nifty axe/hammer multitool in Lidl, tent, groundmat, ultra compact 4-season sleeping bag, kelly kettle of course, and heaps of those lifeboat rations plus a lot more.

One of these fine days I'll get round to photographing it all and uploading it!

I actually use all this stuff for camping and hiking as it turns out, so its not just prepper madness. Plus its always a great idea to crash test all of your kit repeatedly, I've already modified the contents of the bops based on failures or successes of the various pieces of equipment. The Brunton Storm has been ditched for example, that is one fifty euro piece of shite.

The best equipment is right between your ears though. You can bet your life on it.

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Micky Dolenz Registered User
#20

Divert an gutter down pipe into bathroom window and Into bath. A near constant supply of water.

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Zomg Okay Registered User
#21

Micky Dolenz said:
Divert an gutter down pipe into bathroom window and Into bath. A near constant supply of water.


Good idea but you'd need to keep the gutter spotless, which could cause problems depending on the local Z population.

Daisy M Registered User
#22

Weapons would be a must for me, knives of all sizes, baseball bats and me fathers rifle. Batteries, candles, blackout curtains, books, food lots of food and water and wine bottles and bottles of it. Matches sleeping bags, drums of petrol and a car at the ready. Fuel, binoculars, board games, a cb, a boat to get to clare island and vegetable seeds to be self sufficent long term.

Doc Ruby Registered User
#23

Zomg Okay said:
Good idea but you'd need to keep the gutter spotless, which could cause problems depending on the local Z population.

You'll need to filter and boil all the water you drink anyway, so I can't imagine gutter water would be much different.

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Peetrik Registered User
#24

Doc Ruby said:
You'll need to filter and boil all the water you drink anyway, so I can't imagine gutter water would be much different.


Actually, just on this, I got talking to a woman who works as a chemist in the Environmental protection agency testing public waterways/rivers etc. She was saying that while she wouldn't drink it herself, Ireland actually have some of the cleanest, least polluted rivers in Europe.
I had always just assumed that with slurry run off, pesitcide spraying, dodgy septic tanks etc our rivers would be lethal but apparently not.

Winning

3 people have thanked this post
ScumLord Moderator
#25

Peetrik said:
Actually, just on this, I got talking to a woman who works as a chemist in the Environmental protection agency testing public waterways/rivers etc. She was saying that while she wouldn't drink it herself, Ireland actually have some of the cleanest, least polluted rivers in Europe.
I had always just assumed that with slurry run off, pesitcide spraying, dodgy septic tanks etc our rivers would be lethal but apparently not.

Winning
Most people probably wouldn't be too far from a river source either. If you get near to any hill/mountain you'll probably find a stream somewhere that's a clean as water can get.

Maybe we need a map of clean water locations up here somewhere.

jameverywhere Registered User
#26

Doc Ruby said:
You'll need to filter and boil all the water you drink anyway, so I can't imagine gutter water would be much different.



Depends on how the Z infection is spread. If a Zed climbs onto your roof and drools or bleeds in your gutter, well...

#27

ScumLord said:

Maybe we need a map of clean water locations up here somewhere.

Go find your own ya lazy feck!

ScumLord Moderator
#28

kildare.17hmr said:
Go find your own ya lazy feck!
I have a 10m by 10m metal tank being continuously feed with fresh spring water. I'm just fine and dandy.

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chrismon Registered User
#29

Walkie Talkies
Rechargeable batteries
Wind up battery charger.

Kash Registered User
#30

Just thinking about what we have in the house right now - i think we could survive for quite a while:

Fresh water supply, we have our own well and means to get to the water sans power - and there is a mountain spring a stones throw from the back door. Yay for living up a mountain.

Fair amount of food, tinned and dehydrated, and a monster load in the freezer. So, we'd eat like kings to avoid that going to waste. Then of course there is all the beasties nearby - cows, sheep, chicken, duck, rabbit, pheasant. Fair point about knowing how to butcher a cow, but something that could be learned - the basics stay the same no matter the size of the animal. Loads of nearby farms and a growing vegetable garden. Plus, I have a fair knowledge of what's edible out there in the countryside. A couple of gas bottles, and a camping stove for cooking and/or the actual stove inside the house.

Weapons/home defense: two machetes (used for gardening, we're not psychos) and a whole host of gardening tools, smithing hammers, plus plenty of kitchen knives, and two rather large dogs. Of course, feeding them could be difficult long term, but having them around would probably outweigh the difficulties.

Well stocked first aid, with good supply of painkillers and some generic antibiotics. Basic to adequate first aid training - I could set a bone, clean and stitch a wound, treat for shock etc. without too much trouble. Of course, anything more serious would cause problems.

Transport: this is where we would be in danger. I have two mountain bikes and the means to repair them, but we live on a mountain. Traveling by bike is tough going, and I'm not sure I could outpace a running zombie going up a hill! This coupled with the fact that because we are so remote, any supplies we would need would be a fair distance away (30/40 minutes by car) traveling to and from them would put us in the most amount of danger.

If I had a small bit of notice, I like to think I could stock up on the necessities, swot up on the skills, and be pretty prepared when the proverbial hit the fan.

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