#1

I was out on a 60km cycle yesterday and found that 3/4 way through I had emptied my water bottle. I was not passing any shops so I just kept going and toughed it out until I got home. I had a raging dehydration headache for most of the evening yesterday and found that I didn't sleep too well last night. I prehydrate fairly well, but I am always thirsty in the saddle.

Are most people bringing 2 bottles with them on the bike?

How are you carrying spares?
I have a saddle bag which holds a tube and a multi-tool, but its full with all that. I have another triangular bag which straps on to the frame and hangs over the bosses for the second bottle cage. If I was to bring a second bottle, I wouldn't be able to bring the tri-bag.
I know that the ideal solution is to get a bigger saddle bag. But I bring so much other stuff in the triangular bag, that i don't know how big of a saddle bag I'd need.

Anyone got any recommendations?

Ideally it would be something that would carry the tube, patches, glue and sandpaper, multi-tool, tyre levers, chain splitter and maybe even a second tube for a very long ride.

The saddle bags that I have seen for sale lately would only hold half of this stuff.

Any advice appreciated!!

#2

Why not use on of the pockets on your jersey to hold a spare bottle?

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seamus Dental Plan!
#3

Most people manage the second bottle on the second bottle cage

What are you carrying that you need the second triangular bag?

I can get two tubes, a minipump, tyre lever, a chain tool, a multitool and patches into my saddlebag, and it's not that big. If I need to bring anything else (Jacket, etc) it goes into the pockets on the back of my jersey.

You can get attachments for pumps, etc that clip onto the bosses for the second bottle cage, along with the second bottle cage, so you can attach the pump to the frame and carry a second water bottle.

You should also be able to carry a full 500ml water bottle in one of your jersey pockets if you're stuck.

Maybe also try a larger bottle for your "main" one. I bring a 750ml and a 500ml. The 500ml only because a 750ml won't fit in the second cage.

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doozerie Registered User
#4

I'm with Seamus, a second bottle cage is the best way to go as far as I am concerned, and 750ml bottles are great (I normally bring two though I often don't even start on the second). I find carrying a full bottle in a jersey pocket is a real pain - I don't like bulky objects in the middle jersey pocket in case a falls pushes it against my spine, and in a side pocket it'll just pull the jersey to one side all the time which is a hassle.

I've seen some huge saddle bags on some bikes, which could probably hold a 500ml bottle, but I'm not a fan of those. Bigger/heavier means greater risk of the mount failing/breaking and having weight that high up on the bike itself may also affect handling of the bike when out of the saddle. Similar to seamus, my (fairly small) saddle bag holds tubes (2), tyre levers, a multitool (which includes a chain tool), some self-adhesive patches, and a tyre boot. My pump goes on the frame, my keys, phone, rain jacket and food all go in my pockets and still leave room to spare. I don't find I need anything else with me, but if I did and it wouldn't fit in my pockets then I'd opt for a very small backpack.

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#5

I always bring two bottles. One of my frames has bolts for a third under the downtube.
Why did you not knock on a door and ask for some tap water?

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C3PO Registered User
#6

Two bottles on the bike, 2 tubes, gas cannister, small pump, multitool and gels/bars in my pockets! Sorted!

#7

reilig said:
I was out on a 60km cycle yesterday and found that 3/4 way through I had emptied my water bottle. I was not passing any shops so I just kept going and toughed it out until I got home. I had a raging dehydration headache for most of the evening yesterday and found that I didn't sleep too well last night. I prehydrate fairly well, but I am always thirsty in the saddle.

Are most people bringing 2 bottles with them on the bike?

How are you carrying spares?
I have a saddle bag which holds a tube and a multi-tool, but its full with all that. I have another triangular bag which straps on to the frame and hangs over the bosses for the second bottle cage. If I was to bring a second bottle, I wouldn't be able to bring the tri-bag.
I know that the ideal solution is to get a bigger saddle bag. But I bring so much other stuff in the triangular bag, that i don't know how big of a saddle bag I'd need.

Anyone got any recommendations?

Ideally it would be something that would carry the tube, patches, glue and sandpaper, multi-tool, tyre levers, chain splitter and maybe even a second tube for a very long ride.

The saddle bags that I have seen for sale lately would only hold half of this stuff.

Any advice appreciated!!


My Topeak wedge saddle bag (medium) holds: glue/patch/sandpaper kit, 3 levers, mini-pump (can also be strapped to the outside loops), multi-tool, chain splitter, powerlink, 1 or 2 tubes (depending on the bike in use) and maybe even a light rain jacket. It's not a particularly bulky bag either.

Two bottles for me in the frame cages, but only in warmer weather; A 500ml with electrolytes and a 750ml with water.

A

seamus Dental Plan!
#8

It's also worth getting to know regular watering holes on your routes. Lots of pubs will happily fill up your water bottle (especially if you stop for a sandwich), and place like the cafe in Laragh have a tap outside you can use to fill the bottle for free.

If you plan far enough ahead, you can set it up so that you arrive at a certain pub at roughly the same time your water bottle is empty. Pop in, sandwich (or whatever), fill the bottle and away you go.

maloner Registered User
#9

If required I'm prepared to use my iphone in lieu of a chain tool.

It can also solve a whole variety of other terminal cycling mechanicals.

Can be pricey to refill after use though.

2 1l bottles is what I go with, often with a stop for a refill (in a shop) on long spins if required.

#10

yeah just gonna say pubs are dodgy try and sell you bottle water ok if you have money with you
anyway if you havent got a second bottle cage fitted to your bike then get one on it today always carry two bidons one water one high energy dring which you drink on the return journey

kenmc Registered User
#11

I suspect if you dumped the triangular bag, you would save so much weight you wouldn't even need to put a second cage on the newly exposed bosses!

What on earth are you carrying around with you?

For a 60km spin, at this time of year especially, I personally wouldn't even empty 1 750ml bottle. In "summer" time, I might get through it, but there are plenty of shops around which sell bottles of water and there's always a couple of quid in my patch box, worst case.

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kenmc Registered User
#12

feck sake lads said:
yeah just gonna say pubs are dodgy try and sell you bottle water ok if you have money with you

Not if you ask for a pint of tapwater. Anecdotally, I believe they cannot refuse you tap water. This may not be true of course.

#13

kenmc said:

What on earth are you carrying around with you?



A small puncture repair kit with levers, a chain splitter, a second tube (sometimes), a small pump, spare batteries for lights, mobile phone and maybe a banana or 2.

Its not really that heavy, its just convenient.

#14

kenmc said:
Not if you ask for a pint of tapwater. Anecdotally, I believe they cannot refuse you tap water. This may not be true of course.

i think your right on that btw good point.

Transporting Registered User
#15

I would imagine you need to be thinking about what you are doing in terms of hydration before you ever get on the bike, you should try and stay well hydrated all the time by regularly drinking water every day. When drinking on the bike take sips instead of big mouthfulls. Mount a second bottle cage if you can also.

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