• I have made a complaint about an ad. (17.36%)
  • I've tought about making a complaint but haven't so far. (18.06%)
  • I wouldn't make a complaint about an ad. (47.92%)
  • Advertising Jaguar. (16.67%)
#46

Fighting Irish said:
And we wonder why the world is so fooked up? lol some people need to get a life

Which people? And how does it have anything to do with the world being fooked up?

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#47

strobe said:
Out of curiosity Dudess what would you think of the view that women taking it upon themselves to complain about the Hunky Dorys etc ads hurts rather than helps in relation to 'a female politician: looks have to be brought into it; a female representative of a charity: looks have to be commented on; her do-ability etc... to the abandonment of her other attributes.'?

I get a pain in me hole when some women get in a flap over the likes of the Hunky Dory ads. That said, if someone makes a well thought out argument explaining why they object to them, I won't dismiss what they have to say.

If a woman's looks are integral to her role, fair enough to comment on them, but I don't see the need for every woman ever in the public eye to have her looks scrutinised, e.g. Merkel.

Anyone see the latest Muller Light ad? Face-palm. Makes the man out to be completely hapless and subservient, and makes the women out to be manipulative bitches.

I wouldn't get particularly bothered by just an ad, but since we're discussing it here: it's interesting to dissect them.

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Fighting Irish Registered User
#48

Dudess said:
Which people? And how does it have anything to do with the world being fooked up?



People who have time to care enough about an ad on tv, that they ring/write a complaint to the makers of the the ad

MyKeyG Registered User
#49

Fighting Irish said:
People who have time to care enough about an ad on tv, that they ring/write a complaint to the makers of the the ad
Nonsense. Ads are the bane of the televisual experience, always have been. They're designed to evoke certain responses in people and move them to a particular action. You can hardly blame them when that reaction is a negative one!!!

Personally I think it reflects a modicum of decency still remaining in society when people are moved to act against something they consider wrong whether big or small.

Morag Registered User
#50

Filling in the complaint forum on the advertising standards site takes less then 5 mins.
Often people spend more time giving out about things then doing anything about them.

I find it strange that men who have said they see ads which they have an issue with
wouldn't take those minutes to make a complaint, as it does make a difference.

Is it part of some strange man code which has 'mustn't grumble' or 'make a fuss'?

There are issues which effect men but complaining about them seems to be unmanly someone how, which I find strange.

#51

Sharrow said:
Filling in the complaint forum on the advertising standards site takes less then 5 mins.
Often people spend more time giving out about things then doing anything about them.

I find it strange that men who have said they see ads which they have an issue with
wouldn't take those minutes to make a complaint, as it does make a difference.

Is it part of some strange man code which has 'mustn't grumble' or 'make a fuss'?

There are issues which effect men but complaining about them seems to be unmanly someone how, which I find strange.


Because every woman that sees an ad she doesn't like always lodges a complaint?

'Man code'... 'seems to be unmanly'...really Shar? Is it not more likely that some men and women not reporting ads has less to do with the fact they are men and women and more to do with the fact they are who they are as individuals?

Is this where you were hoping to lead to when starting the thread from the beginning? 'You men don't report ads because you are subject to an imposed idea of manliness' or some such shite?

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MyKeyG Registered User
#52

Sharrow said:
Filling in the complaint forum on the advertising standards site takes less then 5 mins.
Often people spend more time giving out about things then doing anything about them.

I find it strange that men who have said they see ads which they have an issue with
wouldn't take those minutes to make a complaint, as it does make a difference.

Is it part of some strange man code which has 'mustn't grumble' or 'make a fuss'?

There are issues which effect men but complaining about them seems to be unmanly someone how, which I find strange.
And you have evidence that women do take the time out to complain?

Fighting Irish Registered User
#53

MyKeyG said:
Nonsense. Ads are the bane of the televisual experience, always have been. They're designed to evoke certain responses in people and move them to a particular action. You can hardly blame them when that reaction is a negative one!!!

Personally I think it reflects a modicum of decency still remaining in society when people are moved to act against something they consider wrong whether big or small.


I agree, with ads for driving slowly or giving up smoking etc but actually complaining to whoever because you think an ad is a little sexist or whatever? ha get a life

Morag Registered User
#54

strobe said:
Because every woman that sees an ad she doesn't like always lodges a complaint?


They don't and you know that well. But it's that men don't seem to and that looks to be backed up by the thread which is why I am asking why not.

strobe said:
'Man code'... 'seems to be unmanly'...really Shar? Is it not more likely that some men and women not reporting ads has less to do with the fact they are men and women and more to do with the fact they are who they are as individuals?


It could be that or it could be that it's some sort of thing men just don't tend to do, or that if they do they dont' talk about or it never occurs to them, so I am curious.

I guess it's like voting, it's a behaviour if it's not modeled for you growing up then it's not the done thing, and I am just asking questions.

strobe said:
Is this where you were hoping to lead to when starting the thread from the beginning? 'You men don't report ads because you are subject to an imposed idea of manliness' or some such shite?


Nope I have no preconceived hypothesis which I am trying to prove, I was just wondering if the gentlemen of the tGC have or would ever make such a complaint if they felt and ad was sexist towards men or indeed any add.

I guess it could boil down to people in general being or not being activists (what ever the cause) but the grass roots empowerment of any demographic which feels the need to cause changes, starts with them doing simple things like lodging a complaint for an ad, which takes very little time and the number of complaints does make a difference. A bit like broken window theory.

#55

The reason why I wouldn't ever make a complaint is because I just don't care,anyone with half a brain can see the ads are idiotic.Its certainly not because of some unwritten "man rule".

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#56

Sharrow said:
They don't[...] like broken window theory.



Well I guess to get an idea whether it is something 'that men don't seem to (do)', rather than something that people don't seem to do, you would need to pose the question to a group of women and see if there was a significant variation in the responses compared to here.

I in fact do think men would be slightly less likely to make a complaint than women but I think this is due to men in general having a slightly thicker skin about things than women generally do. I certainly don't think it is because they think it is part of some fictitious man code they must adhere to.

But I could be wrong.

Fighting Irish said:
I agree, with ads for driving slowly or giving up smoking etc but actually complaining to whoever because you think an ad is a little sexist or whatever? ha get a life


FI could you expand on why you wouldn't complain? Is it because you think lodging a complaint about an advert on TV is effeminate? Would you think differently of a man lodging a complaint than you would of a woman lodging a complaint about the same ad? Or...?

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Maguined Registered User
#57

There is a big difference between someone not individually liking an add and not liking or seeing how anyone else could or should enjoy an add and therefore worthy of making a complaint.

I think in general men are less likely to get offended by an add therefore are less likely to lodge a complaint.

Zulu Registered User
#58

Have you considered that: when complaints are apparently ignored (he drives, she dies) or at least no result is evident, that subsequent complaints are far less likly? (The converse applies, if ad's are pulled vis Hunky Dorey, with suitable media attention, following complaints are more likly to occur.)

MyKeyG Registered User
#59

Fighting Irish said:
I agree, with ads for driving slowly or giving up smoking etc but actually complaining to whoever because you think an ad is a little sexist or whatever? ha get a life
You're the only one getting bent out of shape here. If you don't like the thread don't respond to it unless of course being ignorant is your thing.

Morag Registered User
#60

Zulu said:
Have you considered that: when complaints are apparently ignored (he drives, she dies) or at least no result is evident, that subsequent complaints are far less likly? (The converse applies, if ad's are pulled vis Hunky Dorey, with suitable media attention, following complaints are more likly to occur.)


The RSA 'He drives, she dies' campaign unfortunately was able to take advantage of a loop hole and so did not fall under the ASAI remit, the same as ads in cinemas which are not ads but short films (dumb I know) but the fact they got complaints and there was a number of them and they did publish statements on the ads and the numbers of complaints the RSA would have been aware of the fact that they were shooting themselves in the foot and I am sure would think twice before trying that tactic again.

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