N7777G Registered User
#1

Looks like it wants to leave before the axeman comes!

today:- http://flic.kr/p/anz9GL

and this one was taken last February:-

http://flic.kr/p/9gK5wD

Tropheus Registered User
#2

Is there work taking place or has someone just kindly tilted her on to her tail? I'm presuming that latter

nag Registered User
#3

My guess is that Katia gave her a little lift.

Nforce Registered User
#4

Reminds me of the Vulcan bomber that was caught up in last years snow...

http://news.bbc.co.uk/local/wear/hi/people_and_places/newsid_8454000/8454766.stm

1 person has thanked this post
280special Registered User
#5

Sad to see the old lady like this. Are they really thinking of scrapping her?

280special Registered User
#6

Just heard from a friend who called into Weston today. He wasnt able to gain close access so could only view from the far side of the field but despite the attentions of some nosey ole fella in a Merc he was able to see that she was back on her paws again !

xmac1x Registered User
#7

I know this is an old thread but they actually just chopped up the poor Catalina last month. Saw an article in the recent aero monthly. what a shame... scrapped..

#8

xmac1x said:
I know this is an old thread but they actually just chopped up the poor Catalina last month. Saw an article in the recent aero monthly. what a shame... scrapped..


Yeah there was a thread here last month mentioned the same, i think its the Weston for sale one

Bebop Registered User
#9

Keeping a World War 2 vintage aircraft of this size in flying condition would be very expensive and unless you can afford to do this properly then there is no way you will be allowed to fly it
quite apart from the steep fuel cost per flying hour and the shortage of spares, Seaplanes like the Catalina are prone to hull corrosion and its very rare to find one that is still airworthy,

there are still a few flying in the Carribbean and in the USA but most survivors are now in museums, even a refurb to static display condition would need a sponsor with deep pockets,

but it's sad to see an old lady reduced to this, she deserved better

#10

Yes it was probably never going to fly again. I saw it up close a few times. It was too far gone for that. To be honest it was a bit of a basket case. But it's hard to believe there was no effort to simply give it to someone, a museum, anyone who could store it for a while. The museum in Northern Ireland where there are strong connections to Catalinas would be the most obvious.

If nothing else parts could be used to keep others flying or restored.

A complete waste.

xmac1x Registered User
#11

I think there are around 25 in flight worthy condition in the world. I wonder whether the scrap idea was a nama initiative or just some private owner who had had enough

Deus vult Registered User
#12

I heard from a pilot from the flight school based in Weston that the catalina was involved in a crash years ago that killed some members of the crew ?, anybody know if there is any truth in this ? .

Nforce Registered User
#13

Deus vult said:
I heard from a pilot from the flight school based in Weston that the catalina was involved in a crash years ago that killed some members of the crew ?, anybody know if there is any truth in this ? .


Yes,it's true. More info on the aircraft here... http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?p=79440078

#14

Not the crew but passengers, Mayor of Southhampton and someone else. The nose undercarriage door failed and it sank.

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