sbsquarepants Registered User
#1

Here's an interesting map i came across today. I personally am amazed at how much free space there is in an "overcrowded" world! (assuming the map is correct of course)

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imme Registered User
#2

interesting map alright.

Is there a lot of space in the world?
Many parts of the world have little or no habitation at all, huge swathes of Antarctica, Greenland, Brazil, Australia, Canada, Russia.

Then again there's a reason for that.

I remember reading before that Paris is home to more people who live on their own as a % of the city dwellers than other cities.

What are the boundaries they use for the cities mentioned on the map, I wonder, city or greater city.

gozunda Registered User
#3

It has been estimated that just 29% of the planet is actually dry land.

Large parts are inhabitable by reason of altitude / climatic extremes /

In relation to human habitation:

Four fifths of the total land area of the earth is too cold, too dry, too mountainous, forested/marshy
etc

That leaves just one fifth of the planet habitable and more importantly available for food production for an world population approaching 7 million

Continued population growth wont leave to much space for anything else that has the misfortune of sharing the planet ....

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gozunda Registered User
#4

imme said:
interesting map alright.

Is there a lot of space in the world?
Many parts of the world have little or no habitation at all, huge swathes of Antarctica, Greenland, Brazil, Australia, Canada, Russia.

Then again there's a reason for that.

I remember reading before that Paris is home to more people who live on their own as a % of the city dwellers than other cities.

What are the boundaries they use for the cities mentioned on the map, I wonder, city or greater city.


Good point

Cities are differentialy defined:

The boundaries of a city can also be defined in any of several ways:
(taken from wikipedia)
Morphological"City" defined as a physically contiguous urban area, without regard to territorial or other boundaries. The delineation is usually done using some type of urban density, such as population density or density of buildings (for example, "gaps between structures may not exceed 200 metres"). Satellite and/or aerial maps may be used. For statistical convenience, such areas are sometimes adjusted to appropriate administrative boundaries, yielding an agglomeration.

Functional"City" as defined by the habits of its demographic population, as by metropolitan area, labour market area, or similar. Such definitions are usually based on commuting between home and work. Commuter flow thresholds into the core urban area are established by the national census authority, determining which areas are included.

Administrative"City" as strictly defined by a given government (city proper). Typically based on a municipality or equivalent entity, or sometimes a group of municipalities under a regional government.
LINK

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Old Perry Registered User
#5

Bump!!.....Going by that map though( Paris requiring the least amount of space for 6 billion I'd people ) is Paris not that most densely populated city in the world??

wonderfulname Registered User
#6

imme said:
Is there a lot of space in the world?


More like very little space in cities, and you have to remember, cities consume, they don't produce, this doesn't include the land needed to sustain these people, which is where the "overcrowding" problem brushed aside in the OP actually lies.

EDIT: Just looking at the map using London's density and it scares me, 4700 people per sq km taking up a quarter of the states, I'm finding it hard to account for land that would feed that, probably because it doesn't.

wonderfulname Registered User
#7

Old Perry said:
Bump!!.....Going by that map though( Paris requiring the least amount of space for 6 billion I'd people ) is Paris not that most densely populated city in the world??


Not even close, just the most densely populated in this example. In fact, some sites I've looked at to satisfy my own curiosity even contradict that, however everything I've seen puts Mumbai in the top 5, most in top spot, and with a population density of up to 6 times that of Paris.

#8

gozunda said:


Four fifths of the total land area of the earth is too cold, too dry, too mountainous, forested/marshy
etc

That leaves just one fifth of the planet habitable and more importantly available for food production for an world population approaching 7 million



But if there was a necessity for more more habitable land many of these areas could be made productive in some capacity.

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