grind gremlin Registered User
#1

Just wondering how this is fair. I am in this situation at the moment. I have a degree and Hdip in Primary ed done. I have been working for 4 years. After all the different deductions to my wages (none of which I have control over) I come out with less money in my pocket than my SNA. She has the luxury of coming and going with the children while I get to start early, finish late and spend hours and hours planning / correcting. Am I wrong to be really annoyed about this.........

rainbowtrout Registered User
#2

That's impossible to say.

Does she have the same type of contract as you?
Does she get paid for the holidays?
Does she get incremental pay?
Does she have access to the public service pension and make contributions like you?
Do you have union subscriptions/health insurance/any other voluntary deductions deducted at source that you don't have to pay?
Is she married and the only one working in her house and therefore availing of her husband's tax credits?
Is she on a lower wage and therefore paying less tax and less USC and less penion levy as a result?
Is she claiming tax reliefs (like Section 23/tuition fees) that you are unaware of and wouldn't be any of your business.
Has she been an SNA longer that you have been a teacher and worked her way up her salary scale?


SNAs are on the same scale as clerical officer grade starting at €21500 and finishing at €34000 (pre-budget not classed as a new entrant), it's a 13 point scale.

http://careeradvice.loadzajobs.ie/industry-insight/healthcare/special-needs-assistant-job-in-ireland-sna-job-889

There are so many reasons she might be coming out with more pay. If you're that concerned really you should be comparing gross pay with her and see how you fair out. I have a feeling that you will come out better.

So yes I do think you're wrong to be annoyed, if you think she has it so good give up your job as a primary teacher and apply for a job as an SNA, you can swan in and out when you feel like it and for more money too by all accounts.

As of January 2011 the starting salary on the SNA scale is €18521 and top of the scale is €30385 which clearly is a damn sight more than a primary teacher such as yourself who is perhaps on point 7 of the scale after 4 years which is 37929 plus allowances of 6154 for honours degree and dip. I assume you're on full hours.

7 people have thanked this post
grind gremlin Registered User
#3

In retrospect my original post does seem very bitter. You are spot on, the other benefits (pension etc) are much better for a teacher. I just find it crazy that such a big difference in pay scales amounts to very little difference in you weekly take home pay. .... and to be honest, in the current climate, it kills me to have such a huge amount of money deducted from my pay.I'm paying 350 per month in various pensions ( i know our pension scheme is good however). Again, apologies for coming across so negative.

rainbowtrout Registered User
#4

No bother, in the long run you'll probably earn more and have more job security. Look at it that way.

solerina Registered User
#5

OP i can see why you have a problem with this, Its not that you resent your SNA getting what she gets but more that after 4/5 years in college (the time, energy and cost of that) you really should be getting a considerable amount more than someone with much less of a qualification. The public at large think teachers earn a fortune because the salary scale looks good....however after all the deductions the pay is not that brilliant at all (at least for people at the lower part of the scale). I dont think you are wrong in feeling annoyed.

TrinityPhD Registered User
#6

I'd call E45k a year with four years experience an extremely good salary, and I would have called it an extremely good salary in 2006 as well.

Except for the pension levy, all the other deductions apply to everyone else.
If you take the pension levy out, the salary is about E40K a year. Add in the maternity leave, the holidays, the sick pay, the job security . . .

Your take home is what, about E2,500 a month?

Your salary is more than fair for your experience and qualifications.

floating voter Registered User
#7

I think you are right to be annoyed but this is not an sna vs teacher issue.

Because of recent budget changes every penny you earn over 33 odd thousand is taxed at top rate ( otherwise known as the marginal rate)

Every euro over 33K loses 55 cent. More than half. Factor in pension contributions etc and you would want to be earning treble the sna to put clear water between yourself and the sna.

Ireland is now a socialist state floating in the north atlantic where everyone or family earning less than 35K (3 grand a week) is poor and pays for nothing everyone over 35 K is rich and pays for everything.

For all your supposed education you still do not seem to have to grasped the realpolitic of 2011 ireland

delta_bravo Registered User
#8

TrinityPhD said:
I'd call E45k a year with four years experience an extremely good salary, and I would have called it an extremely good salary in 2006 as well.

Except for the pension levy, all the other deductions apply to everyone else.
If you take the pension levy out, the salary is about E40K a year. Add in the maternity leave, the holidays, the sick pay, the job security . . .

Your take home is what, about E2,500 a month?

Your salary is more than fair for your experience and qualifications.


Where are you getting 45k from? Sounds like the op is making approx 15k less than that.

rainbowtrout Registered User
#9

delta_bravo said:
Where are you getting 45k from? Sounds like the op is making approx 15k less than that.


How? The OP said she was working for four years. That, as a qualified teacher on full hours in the primary school system would put her on 38K per annum basic and just over 6K in allowances (dip and degree). That's just over 44K. I gave those figures in my first post. She hasn't refuted those figures so I think people are assuming they are true.

TrinityPhD Registered User
#10

delta_bravo said:
Where are you getting 45k from? Sounds like the op is making approx 15k less than that.


Teacher's salary scale:
http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2055227449

4 years training (i.e. your degree) = start on point 3
4 years experience - + 4 = point 7

Common basic scale - 37,929

Primary degree (1st - 3rd class honours) = +4918

H. dip in Ed (1st/2nd class hons) - 1236

Which would make E44,083

Granted a pass degree and a froebel cert/pass Hdip will be E1,842 and E591 respectively, reducing salary to E40,362, still a decent salary for a pass degree and four years of experience. (monthly take home E2,342 according to tax calc)

In September an incremental point will be applied increasing salary by E2,711

floating voter Registered User
#11

Exactly! OP is buying into staffroom talk and groupthink. At the heart of it is the feeling that she is somehow better and worth more than a lowly SNA.

see here for this kind of thing

http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2056228049

Big Ern Registered User
#12

Despite recent pay cuts, Irish teachers still earn a fair amount with very favourable working conditions. I speak as a teacher having previously worked in Ireland.

1 person has thanked this post
theaceofspies Registered User
#13

Personally I know lot's of people who have left the private sector to join the public sector but for some strange reason I don't know anyone who took the reverse option - must be a coincidence?
Teachers in this country are still enjoying Celtic Tiger ala Benchmarking 1 & 2 wages along with many other members of the public sector such as An Garda Siochana; the facts & research are there to back it up. Sorry to spoil the party lads but the gravy train is running out of track. Your employer is broke. Consider yourself lucky ye are not working in the private sector in 2011 or worse still out of work. Public sector wages/holidays/pensions on average are better than the private sector. Fact.

An Bradán Feasa Registered User
#14

theaceofspies said:
Personally I know lot's of people who have left the private sector to join the public sector but for some strange reason I don't know anyone who took the reverse option - must be a coincidence?
Teachers in this country are still enjoying Celtic Tiger ala Benchmarking 1 & 2 wages along with many other members of the public sector such as An Garda Siochana; the facts & research are there to back it up. Sorry to spoil the party lads but the gravy train is running out of track. Your employer is broke. Consider yourself lucky ye are not working in the private sector in 2011 or worse still out of work. Public sector wages/holidays/pensions on average are better than the private sector. Fact.


What facts? Where are they? I see nothing more than a rant here.

3 people have thanked this post
Bannasidhe Registered User
#15

This happens in the private sector as well. My OH takes home less then the warehouse guy even though she is the shop manager- reason is simple, she is in a higher tax bracket, as an uncivilpartnered same sex couple she can't use my tax credits (not that she could at the moment anyway as the relevant legislation hasn't been enacted) and she has no dependants. Warehouse guy uses his wife's tax credits and has 4 kids.
It really only bothers her when he turns up for work with a sick head on him and does feck all work for the day....

Want to share your thoughts?

Login here to discuss!