2Scoops Registered User
#31

Chi Force said:
I actually mean I'm sure of no funding this year and there's a possibility of some next year! However, this is obviously performance dependent and who knows how that'll work out!


There is no way on Earth I would do a PhD for free. Funding is out there, so either you are being exploited or your research just isn't worthwhile. Remember that it's a skilled role, working for someone else usually, that already requires some sacrifice, so a living wage should be expected.

As to whether a PhD in general is worth doing... if you want a career in academic law, then stay. If your ultimate goal is to practice law professionally, walk away now and get a job.

1 person has thanked this post
IRWolfie- Registered User
#32

maupat said:
Just wondering why you think a PhD in humanities would be an economic waste of time? There are PhDs which, while humanities-based, have a digital or technical element too - would such programmes be a waste of time also?

Interested to hear your reasons on both


I know I'm probably performing necromancy by resurrecting this thread but: The question for me would be whether the technical elements of a humanities PhD actually make you any more desirable to an employeer above everyone else.

#33

I must be the exception then ... I started my PhD in cancer studies at the Uni of Leicester in January 2010 and I will possibly be submitting my thesis in 1 week. I have three publications from my work (highest journal impact factor of just under 14) and I have already started as a Research Associate in my group.

I thrive on the research and - yes - I do the 10 hour days, every day, and don't moan. Having so much success is not solely due to 'luck'. I work very hard at what I do and love it.

While saying this, I am a bit upset at how many PhDs are given out and how apparently 'easy' it is to get one. Universities here in the UK receive a lot of money from non-EU students coming to do their doctorates (upward of 20,000GBP per year). Supervisors then feel pressured, I believe, to award the doctorate even if the work isn't that great.

For me, getting a PhD is the end of the line as a student... it's like completing the race that began when I first went to school when I was 4.

Take care
Kevin

djpbarry Moderator
#34

Kevster said:
While saying this, I am a bit upset at how many PhDs are given out and how apparently 'easy' it is to get one.
In terms of employment prospects for PhD graduates, it doesn't really matter, because prospective employers are not really going to be all that interested in the "Dr." before your name - they'll want to know what you've actually done. Not all PhDs are equal.
Kevster said:
For me, getting a PhD is the end of the line as a student...
Oh, I really don't know about that. If you're going to continue in research, then the learning never stops!

Woodward Registered User
#35

I'm due to start a PhD soon and I would advise anyone thinking about doing one to get some industrial experience first. I was lucky to have a placement during my degree and the 6 months in industry cemented my opinion that research is the only thing that suits me.

Montrealer Registered User
#36

Depends on what field it is, I guess. I'm doing mine in Political Science, and I've discovered that it's about the most useless thing I've done in my life. It's also been a very traumatizing and discouraging experience...

ancapailldorcha Moderator
#37

Woodward said:
I'm due to start a PhD soon and I would advise anyone thinking about doing one to get some industrial experience first. I was lucky to have a placement during my degree and the 6 months in industry cemented my opinion that research is the only thing that suits me.


I'm still looking for one myself. I have a small amount of industry experience but I'm finding a lot of funding bodies are insisting that one be resident in the UK for 3 years to qualify for funding.

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