#1

Hey peeps,
just looking for a quick answer, as I can't find it on Google.

How many calories would you burn including the training and the following hours after Tabata?

Even a rough guesstimation would be of great help, thanks

Khannie Make your dreams happen
#2

300-400. Most of which would be recovery. Wild guess. Not based on a huge amount.

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Hanley Banned
#3

Khannie said:
300-400. Most of which would be recovery. Wild guess. Not based on a huge amount.


For what... 4 minutes of total work?!? That can't be right?!?

Looks like I've been wasting my time walking so!

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The Davestator Registered User
#4

Wearing a decent hr monitor will tell you a lot but difficult to gauge post workout cals.
You could take the opinion that post calorie burn is a bonus and just count workout cals if that's what you're interested in.

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#5

Cheers lads! Hope yer right Khannie!

Khannie Make your dreams happen
#6

Hanley said:
For what... 4 minutes of total work?!? That can't be right?!?

Looks like I've been wasting my time walking so!


Walking is a painfully slow way to burn calories.

I'd say maybe 80-100 calories during the exercise window and 200+ for recovery. If you've ever done a tabata you'll know that they really knock the crap out of you.

Like I said though....it's a guess.

#7

Hanley said:
For what... 4 minutes of total work?!? That can't be right?!?


If you look at the overall picture of calories over a 24 to 48 hour period rather than just over the tabata protocol, I'd imagine that Khannie's guess is not as inaccurate as you might think.

The body has no sense of time so it can't tell the difference between a 4 minute workout and a 40 minute workout. The language it speaks is stress/pain and if a workout is tough enough, it will react by getting stronger and fitter so that another workout like that doesn't hurt quite so much.

The process of getting stronger and fitter requires many calories so over a 24-48 period, I'm sure the body is doing its very best to use excess body fat stores as the source of energy for the strength and endurance building.

With the tabata protocol you end up raising your metabolism for the next 24 to 48 hours. So instead of looking at what calories are burned up its better to look at how many more calories your body needs over a period of time. Only then will it start making sense.

Hanley said:
Looks like I've been wasting my time walking so!


Nah, I'm sure its working very well for you. If you're doing heavy weight training, adding tabatha training might be too much. As time-consuming as steady state cardio is, it rarely stresses the body to the point of disrupting your sleep patterns or interfering with your recovery from weight training workouts.

agentgreen Registered User
#8

Sorry OT, but do you guys just do Tabata on cardio machines/running or do you do it squating/pull-ups etc, kinda crossfit style?

Thanks.

Khannie Make your dreams happen
#9

I think the original tabata study was with weights (squats maybe?). It's meaning has kinda evolved a bit to just mean "absolute balls to the wall for 20 seconds, 10 seconds rest, repeat for 4 minutes". I do it on the bag sometimes with straight punches. I'm always pretty wrecked at the end of it.

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#10

Tabata now sort of colloqiually refers to the 20/10 time signature rather than the actual study, which very few people understand. The original study was on a bike but you could elicit the same effect on an erg, with a barbell for squats (probably front squats would be best) and I've seen it on something like a climber. If you're really bored, go and read the original study and you'll be amazed how far off most people are with their assumptions about what it does.

I've done punching intervals with similar timing signatures but they wouldn't elicit the same effect at all. There's no loading. Essentially you're just doing a weird, tough time interval but it's nothing like the Tabata protocol. I would be very surprised if you were burning 400 calories with a session like that, especially considering you're a thaiboxer and you'd be proficient and mechanically efficient at the movements. We've had guys wear the HRM during pad rounds and you'd be very, very surprised how difficult it is to get them to max heart rate. We have to push very hard.

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Khannie Make your dreams happen
#11

Yeah, sounds about right to me. I might wear my HRM next time i give it a bash. I'd usually do on the spot jogging at the same time when I'm doing it on the bag so I'm moving my arms and legs but I take your point on efficient movement etc.

#12

Khannie said:
Yeah, sounds about right to me. I might wear my HRM next time i give it a bash. I'd usually do on the spot jogging at the same time when I'm doing it on the bag so I'm moving my arms and legs but I take your point on efficient movement etc.

well even lifting your legs wouldn't do it. There's no loading. You get what I mean by loading right? An external load. I didn't remember this but I mentioned it to Will and said there was actually a pretty detailed formula for guessing what % of 1RM it was etc. I can't remember and it's not the world's most thrilling study so I won't go back and read it. From memory I think it was something like 40%.

I know people will think I'm being a stickler but the term "Tabata" has been misappropriated a lot. It dilutes it. Think of a guy going for a slow jog and calling himself a sprinter. People would be pissed at that. Or better yet imagine a guy saying he had a 200kg squat... but he uses the smith... and counts his bodyweight... and only goes to half depth.

Anyway, 20/10 is a good time signature to play around with. It adds variety which is important. For bag work 30/30 for 15 minutes is great

Khannie Make your dreams happen
#13

Ah yeah, I know what you mean by loading. I agree that tabata has been diluted. I more or less said the same earlier. I haven't read the original study and probably wont for a while. I'm happy enough that I know that I'm not doing it the same as the study. Like you say, it adds a bit of variety.

I do 30/30 on the bag and find that decent too though I don't think I could do 15 minutes balls to the wall of that currently. I'm usually pretty messed up after 8 or 9 minutes of it, though I do go hard. I might give it a bash though. I'm starting to get more interested in pushing endurance as I move into the 5 rounders now. It's a totally different pace (at least my first two were).

#14

Try this:

10 mins- 30 on, 30 off and you go balls out for the 30. Don't do the knees up instead dig your toes in like you would if you were throwing bodyshots
Break
Some strength work, even bodyweight stuff would be good
Break
10mins- 30 on 30 off
Break
Some strength

The problem is when you give guys long workouts to do they pace themselves, even if they don't want to. You're better off breaking it into shorter blocks. I think we've had this discussion before maybe but when you're moving towards 5 rounders or longer periods I actually wouldn't alter what I was doing that much at all. B class thai is 5x2 right? So it's only 4 mins extra work which still doesn't really make it more of an endurance activity than it already is. What I'm saying is the basic makeup is the same.

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Khannie Make your dreams happen
#15

Yeah, B class is 5 x 2 with 1 minute breaks. Part of the difference is pace is that you're more relaxed of course. Next step up is 5 x 3 with 2 minute breaks. I'm hoping to move up to that sooner rather than later. I have ants in my pants.

That sounds like a filthy workout. I think I'll give it a try this week.

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