morning delight Registered User
#1

I was in an industrial unit last week and noticed the simplest of internal walls. A basic timber frame with plasterboard nailed on to it. Looks ok but I wouldn't fancy leaning too much against it!

So it got me thinking what internal wall options are there? Particularly basic options for a work area is what I've in mind.

plasteritup Registered User
#2

timber stud partitions would be the norm,with plasterboard and skim finish,really depends on what you want and where it is going,what will be fixed to it etc.strength wise,if the timber work is good it should not be a problem.

cheif kaiser Registered User
#3

I know this is an old thread but I have the same question.. What are the options for internal walls in an extension ? I am not a fan of stud walls at all, are these the norm in all extensions ? Are they usually soundproofed ? Is it possible to have solid internal walls built and if so what is the cost difference ? Any advice appreciated.

recipio Registered User
#4

cheif kaiser said:
I know this is an old thread but I have the same question.. What are the options for internal walls in an extension ? I am not a fan of stud walls at all, are these the norm in all extensions ? Are they usually soundproofed ? Is it possible to have solid internal walls built and if so what is the cost difference ? Any advice appreciated.


Ditto. I am looking at purchasing a half finished house but all the internal walls are timber studs at present. Can you rip them out and put 4" solid block wall on a concrete slab floor. ?

kilclon Registered User
#5

See here

Block wall will be a bit more expensive and take longer to build. More difficult to move if you want to change layout and requires a more substantial foundation. It will depend on the depth of the existing slab and its build up as to whether or not it will provide adequate foundation.
To chief kaiser, if you don't like stud walls you can easily substitute for concrete blocks. Both have their limitations and advantages.

recipio Registered User
#6

kilclon said:
See here

Block wall will be a bit more expensive and take longer to build. More difficult to move if you want to change layout and requires a more substantial foundation. It will depend on the depth of the existing slab and its build up as to whether or not it will provide adequate foundation.
To chief kaiser, if you don't like stud walls you can easily substitute for concrete blocks. Both have their limitations and advantages.


Thanks.
I just hate the hollow sound of stud walls and sound insulation is my main concern. Is there a lightweight block available in say 4" with good sound insulation properties. ?

Markcheese Registered User
#7

recipio said:
Thanks.
I just hate the hollow sound of stud walls and sound insulation is my main concern. Is there a lightweight block available in say 4" with good sound insulation properties. ?


Quinlite blocks are available , bit they're pricey... Don't know what the story would be with foundations for that...

cheif kaiser Registered User
#8

Markcheese said:
Quinlite blocks are available , bit they're pricey... Don't know what the story would be with foundations for that...


I was looking at aircrete blocks as an option but as you say they seem to be expensive but I am wondering if by the time you install a decent sound barrier in a stud wall, would the cost difference be all that great? I would also imagine that the aircrete blocks would be easier to move if at a later stage you decided to change the layout?

bigreddog Registered User
#9

you could also build a staggered stud wall - to reduce sound transmittance (decoupled wall construction).
easy, and cheap to do - but you would end up with a thicker wall than with straight 4x2s

Andrew_Doran Registered User
#10

cheif kaiser said:
I was looking at aircrete blocks as an option but as you say they seem to be expensive but I am wondering if by the time you install a decent sound barrier in a stud wall, would the cost difference be all that great? I would also imagine that the aircrete blocks would be easier to move if at a later stage you decided to change the layout?


I'm no expert but in my limited experience aerated blocks like Quinnlites are fragile and shatter, crack and chip easily. I don't know if you'd have much joy in re-using them.

cheif kaiser Registered User
#11

Andrew_Doran said:
I'm no expert but in my limited experience aerated blocks like Quinnlites are fragile and shatter, crack and chip easily. I don't know if you'd have much joy in re-using them.


Sorry I worded that badly! I didn't mean to reuse them, I meant to remove them and build wall elsewhere i.e. It would be easier to take down than a concrete block wall.

Markcheese Registered User
#12

cheif kaiser said:
Sorry I worded that badly! I didn't mean to reuse them, I meant to remove them and build wall elsewhere i.e. It would be easier to take down than a concrete block wall.


Same process to demolish , same mess , same dust ... Lighter wheelbarrow hauling stuff out to skip ..
Depending on the noise you're keeping out you could just put some acoustic insulation in the stud wall(that's what we did in the tv room) ,and
possibly double slab it,

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