SomeDude Registered User
#1

I hear a lot of people using the phrase "happy out", or "busy out".

Does anyone know the origin of these expressions I cringe everytime I hear someone use them.

I'm no professor of English, but me do be thinking it is no proper English.....

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consultech Registered User
#2

SomeDude said:
I hear a lot of people using the phrase "happy out", or "busy out".

Does anybody know the origins of these expressions I cringe everytime I hear someone use them.

I'm no professor of English, but me do be thinking it is no proper English.....



Thank You. I first heard this saying just before Christmas, and thought it was an English thing (heard it from an English person). I must have been totally ignorant to it because I hear it on a weekly basis all over now that I'm aware of it. It annoys me too for some reason.

The Rook Registered User
#3

consultech said:
No, it's no.


I think (just a slight hint due to the syntax of the entire last sentence) that the OP may have intended that !!

Menengrothâ„¢ Registered User
#4

don't know who you hang around with but I have never heard that before.

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maccasarlaigh Registered User
#5

SomeDude said:
I hear a lot of people using the phrase "happy out"


It's when one of the dwarves finally admitted he was gay.

He was Happy, out, and very happy. It all stemmed from there.

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Gone Drinking Registered User
#6

Ricky Martin's happy out

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Black Swan Category Moderator
#7

SomeDude said:
I hear a lot of people using the phrase "happy out"... Does anyone know the origin of these expressions?

Consult Guinness

Noopti Registered User
#8

Culchies?

Xavi6 Registered User
#9

It's a horrible expression that I've only heard used by culchies, and it's usually followed by the word "like".

/shudder

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#10

Maybe it stems from 'Sound out'

Culchie: 'Oh she's sound out, she is. Face on her like a badgers arse, but I'd still roide 'er'.

wayne0308 Registered User
#11

I've been using and hearing "happy out" as long as I can remember. Now that you mention it I've not heard it many times in Dublin. Never took much notice of it to be honest.

petes Registered User
#12

Some dude came up with them.

2 people have thanked this post
MaybeLogic Registered User
#13

I never heard it till now, tbh.
Must be culchie-speak.

youcancallmeal Registered User
#14

Maybe it evolved from the phrase 'Mad out of it' which does make a little bit of sense?

NoDice Registered User
#15

I'm happy out using the words "happy out"!

I don't see anything wrong with it..

Like we definately say "like" too much..

Also, my hungarian friend thinks alot of what we say is "cringe-worthy".

We sit down, put our lunch on the table and say for no reason "now!".. Why do we say that?

Or instead of saying goodbye to a friend we say "go on"..

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