argosy2006 Banned
#46

kebabfest said:
Some great advice here. If you have a 2nd house that isn't lived in and you cannot get too very often then switch the water off. Also Keep the heat on the timer if you can, especially during the night.
If your pipes are frozen here then at least they won't flood the place by the time you get back there.


thanks, i'll do that to all ten of my houses, what about my castle in de countryside, at tips for that?

darraghw Registered User
#47

ravima said:
shower is not working - water inlet pipe to shower is frozen. how can i prevent this happening once water resumes later tomorrow??


Have the same problem, have water in the house just the shower wont work? Anyone have any ideas?

Borzoi Registered User
#48

argosy2006 said:
thanks, i'll do that to all ten of my houses, what about my castle in de countryside, at tips for that?


Whip the servants harder, as they attempt to flee, they'll generate enough heat to keep your draughty ol' castle warm.


On a more serious note - when looking for a shovel yesterday I discovered my water supply goes through the garage - in a pipe that prior to yesterday was not insulated (muppet builders)

detoxkid Registered User
#49

what is the logic of leaving the attic door open to prevent frozen pipes? I tried it today and it does work but I haven't a clue why? Thanks

#50

detoxkid said:
what is the logic of leaving the attic door open to prevent frozen pipes? I tried it today and it does work but I haven't a clue why? Thanks


the heat from the house rises easily into attic.

Bebop Registered User
#51

[moved from DIY forum]
our gas boiler stopped working today, its a Worcester Greenstar condensing gas boiler, I rang 2 numbers from the golden pages but they were not interested,

then I looked up the Worcester web page they had a link to some FAQ's for boiler problems in cold weather..one of the issues with condensing boilers is that they have a condensate water drain from the boiler which normally goes to the nearest drain by plastic pipe, this can freeze and cause the boiler to stop working, even though our pipe was lagged it was indeed frozen, I disconnected the pipe from the boiler and rigged a temporary drain to our kitchen sink,the boiler is working fine now, there is only a slight trickle from the pipe and I will fix a more permanent drain when the cold spell is over.

Its worth checking this if you are having trouble with one of the newer condensing boilers

Lemondrop kid Registered User
#52

gman2k said:
Rule 1:
Don't have insulation under your cold water storage tank in your attic.
Heat from the house below will keep your tank warm enough to prevent freezing.
Rule 2:
Insulate the sides and top of your tank.
Lag all pipes in the attic, and pipe joints etc. Even lag your overflow pipe.
No need to leave your attic hatch open if the above is done correctly. Proper pipe insulation is best, especially if the pipes are above the attic insulation.
Do not tightly wrap glass fibre or rockwool insulation either around the tank or pipes. If this type of insulation is compressed it no longer acts as an insulator.

Most of the energy consumed from a standard 100w light bulb is emitted as heat, not light. A light bulb will increase the temp in your attic and may help to prevent frost. We normally don't notice this heat from standard bulbs as they are at ceiling level.
An infra-red lamp or bulb emits nearly all energy as heat, and definitely will greatly increase temperature in attic, but you must be careful with these and where you place them, as there is a fire risk if you place them too close to roof felt or some types of insulation.


At last an informed voice (sounds like it anyway...)
Q. My pipes are frozen outside (feed pipe underground)
1/ Anything i can do bout that?
2/ Is it best to conserve the water tank water as it may be all i have, by closing off the upstairs dripping tap, or might this action increase the risk of frozen pipes upstairs?
PS Does an electric shower run off the water from attic tank or from mains? (I'm guessing tank)

iamskippy Registered User
#53

Joey the lips said:
Nahh leave the attic door in most modern houses open and half the house will catch pnuemonia.

An easier solution would be to run a 100w bulb up through a hole in the door. Yes this does work...and leave your down stairs tap on a very slow drip. If you are really over concerned.
why the downstairs tap?

AckwelFoley Registered User
#54

martyc5674 said:
Sorry but its a myth!!...A 100W bulb wouldnt warm your socks never mind a large uninsulated draughty attic..its nonsense and you have just been lucky/your pipes are well covered.

subiedunne speaks sense...listen to him/her!

Marty.


Please marty. Dont talk nonsence.

Put your hand on a 100 watt bulb when its on and tell me theres no heat from it.

Its not about "warming" your attic, its about placing a bulb in your attic near pipes that need to be kept from freezing, a mere degree or more in incresed overall heat of that area will prevent hard freezing.

Its no myth

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Zen65 Registered User
#55

iamskippy said:
why the downstairs tap?


By "downstairs tap" I believe the contributor was referring to the incoming tap from the mains (in the kitchen, normally). Leaving this running reduces the chances of the water from the mains freezing (because running water less likely to freeze as it passes through the cold spots on your domestic connection).

Leaving an upstairs tap would also draw water from the mains, but in batches only as the tank fills from the mains only when the level falls low enough to open the ballcock valve. The unsteady flow of water increases the chances of freezing, and the noise of the tank filling every few minutes may interrupt your sleep.

But running taps wastes a scarce resource, and we might all be left without water if everyone did this. Worse again if your drains freeze the running tap may flood your house quietly while you sleep.

Check your mains supply pipes for exposed sections. These are typically around the stopcock, or the pipes near your sink (inside or out). If you have exposed pipework outside then insulate them with a non-absorbent insulating material (like packing foam). If you have exposed pipework inside the house make sure the area doesn't get too cold.

Re opening the attic door.... this will stop the incoming pipe to your tank freezing but at the expense of making your house cold. Insulating the pipes is a better option. In the short term if you can't get insulation for this right now, the 100W light bulb, placed near to the pipes, should be sufficient to avoid freezing temperatures there, but don't let anything cover the bulb, and don't leave the bulb near anything which could melt or catch fire.

Remember it's the PIPES which you are worried about, not the TANK. It will be a cold month in hell before the tank can freeze. Also a frozen tank will recover without doing damage, but a frozen pipe is very likely to burst as the water expands below 4 degrees centigrade.

Stay warm and dry this winter,

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Richiecats Registered User
#56

Use hot water bottle if frozen, as been said be a light bulb is for light, if they were that great for heating we would not have rads and could stop using the fire.

Zen65 Registered User
#57

Lemondrop kid said:
At last an informed voice (sounds like it anyway...)
PS Does an electric shower run off the water from attic tank or from mains? (I'm guessing tank)


There's two ways of connecting these devices, so it could be fed from either the mains or the tank. The most common way is to connect it from the tank.

Re "outdoor" pipes frozen... check that it's not just the last few feet indoors that's doing the damage.... try using a hairdryer on the pipes near the sink.

Cheers,

Zen65 Registered User
#58

Lemondrop kid said:

Q. My pipes are frozen outside (feed pipe underground)
1/ Anything i can do bout that?
2/ Is it best to conserve the water tank water as it may be all i have, by closing off the upstairs dripping tap, or might this action increase the risk of frozen pipes upstairs?


Conserve your water, don't run it out through your taps. If the blockage is outside then running your water will not help, not even slightly. You may be able to survive on bottled water, but you'll be wanting to flush the toilet!

Joey the lips Stealing Hugs Chasing Kisses
#59

iamskippy said:
why the downstairs tap?


Zen65 said:
By "downstairs tap" I believe the contributor was referring to the incoming tap from the mains (in the kitchen, normally). Leaving this running reduces the chances of the water from the mains freezing (because running water less likely to freeze as it passes through the cold spots on your domestic connection).

Leaving an upstairs tap would also draw water from the mains, but in batches only as the tank fills from the mains only when the level falls low enough to open the ballcock valve. The unsteady flow of water increases the chances of freezing, and the noise of the tank filling every few minutes may interrupt your sleep.

But running taps wastes a scarce resource, and we might all be left without water if everyone did this. Worse again if your drains freeze the running tap may flood your house quietly while you sleep.

Check your mains supply pipes for exposed sections. These are typically around the stopcock, or the pipes near your sink (inside or out). If you have exposed pipework outside then insulate them with a non-absorbent insulating material (like packing foam). If you have exposed pipework inside the house make sure the area doesn't get too cold.

Re opening the attic door.... this will stop the incoming pipe to your tank freezing but at the expense of making your house cold. Insulating the pipes is a better option. In the short term if you can't get insulation for this right now, the 100W light bulb, placed near to the pipes, should be sufficient to avoid freezing temperatures there, but don't let anything cover the bulb, and don't leave the bulb near anything which could melt or catch fire.

Remember it's the PIPES which you are worried about, not the TANK. It will be a cold month in hell before the tank can freeze. Also a frozen tank will recover without doing damage, but a frozen pipe is very likely to burst as the water expands below 4 degrees centigrade.

Stay warm and dry this winter,



No i was not talking about the mains. I was refering to the downstairs bathroom tap which if plumbed correctly takes its feed from the attic tank.

Why?

Because this is the lowest point on the plumbing system from the attic its its also the furthest point the water has to travel through the house.The tank in the attic may also recover but the joints of the fittings may not.

and for the second part folks I also said I did not rec it but if it means the difference between you and your sleep tonight I would rather leave the water running.


The only real contrabution I gave was to say

Do not leave the attic door open. Especially on modern houses where the facia boards are not sealed as this will cause pnuemonia in the house

Use a 100w light bulb to take the chill out of the attic.

again for those that wont read my post. I dont condone leaving taps running.

Joey the lips Stealing Hugs Chasing Kisses
#60

Lemondrop
At last an informed voice (sounds like it anyway...)
Q. My pipes are frozen outside (feed pipe underground)
1/ Anything i can do bout that?
2/ Is it best to conserve the water tank water as it may be all i have, by closing off the upstairs dripping tap, or might this action increase the risk of frozen pipes upstairs?
PS Does an electric shower run off the water from attic tank or from mains? (I'm guessing tank)



You hadly expect someone to answer your question with that kind of opening do you

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