kevpants Registered User
#46

floggg said:

But the fact that i managed to quote Rippetoe and still get Kevpants to agree with me means i must be right this time:!!!!!!!


This is very true. Rarely do the planets align so.

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slicus ricus Registered User
#47

Funnily enough, I have never had a callous cut either. I used to wear gloves for all my training back in the day but ditched them after a while. I probably wouldn't be putting myself in the firing line as much as the crossfit guys in terms of callous tears though.

For deadlifting, I think chalk is defo the way to go due to its anti-persperant qualities. Definately enables you to get the most from your grip.

What are peoples opinions on wraps for deadlifting when you start lifting heavier. Are they worthwhile or just counterproductive? Should they be used in the same manner as a belt (i.e. when you put a certain amount of weight on the bar, should you use them)?

Davei141 Registered User
#48

kevpants said:
But it's not working. Your hands are going to get the shock of your life when you ditch the gloves and they are going to tear even worse because chances are you're going to be deadlifting more weight than you were when you originally adopted gloves. If you'd just let your hands heal and harden back when you started you'd be over it now.


They are hardening without a doubt because i tried a rep the other day without them, it burned like **** but no tear. im still getting callouses without tears. By the end of the month the gloves will be gone.

If you decide to use gloves to deadlift there are either going to be two options:

1). You eventually get to the point where you miss deadlifts because you keep dropping the bar rather than fail to lock it out and you settle for this being the case in all your future deadlifts.


But the only time i dropped the bar was with a double overhand grip, haven't once dropped it since changing to over & under

2). You eventually get to the point where you miss deadlifts because you keep dropping the bar rather than fail to lock it out and you ditch the gloves and your sub 100kg soft hands get torn to shreds by the new bigger weight.


When that point comes along they will be hardened already.

It's not "utter nonsense" nor is it "macho". I'm not going to recommend a beginner do something deadlifting that is just to make his balls swell. I'm not slagging off gloves so we can all stand around high fiving each other about how tough we are, using gloves when deadlifting makes no sense.


Going on about gloves and purses is soundbiting. If this thread was deadlifts are ripping my shins apart everyone be saying wear football socks. Football socks have no use apart from protecting your shins. Gloves for the time being protect my callouses. They still harden slowly on squats and bench. I have no problem with grip near my max so all this dropping the bar stuff won't apply for a while yet, by which time the hands will be hardened and the gloves discarded. Till then, ill keep using.

kevpants Registered User
#49

Davei141 said:
They are hardening without a doubt because i tried a rep the other day without them, it burned like **** but no tear. im still getting callouses without tears. By the end of the month the gloves will be gone.

But the only time i dropped the bar was with a double overhand grip, haven't once dropped it since changing to over & under


Hey look do what you want. But for the purposes of this thread being read by countless other people with soft hands I can't just sit back and leave it be.

All your advice is based on assumptions, you assume your hands are hardening, you assume at the end of the month you'll have a set of hands able for your deadlifts. I've been to calous city, bought a mug and a t-shirt, and I can tell you your hand troubles haven't been fixed by the gloves.

You say you did a rep with no tear, you won't get a tear after one rep. Try a few weeks of repeated deadlifting on your previously gloved hands and come back to me.

Davei141 Registered User
#50

kevpants said:
Hey look do what you want. But for the purposes of this thread being read by countless other people with soft hands I can't just sit back and leave it be.

All your advice is based on assumptions, you assume your hands are hardening, you assume at the end of the month you'll have a set of hands able for your deadlifts. I've been to calous city, bought a mug and a t-shirt, and I can tell you your hand troubles haven't been fixed by the gloves.

You say you did a rep with no tear, you won't get a tear after one rep.


I am not assuming they are hardening, i can see and feel the evidence. Plenty of callouses but as i said callouses aren't/weren't the problem. The problem was i did get tears and pretty bad tears at that from one rep, i was not used to that weight or the olympic bar and in turn i wouldn't of been able to repeatedly deadlift for few a weeks had i not stuck the gloves on.

Try a few weeks of repeated deadlifting on your previously gloved hands and come back to me.


Gladly. You said you have been to callous city, what did you do when you got multiple tears on your hands? Did you repeatedly deadlift for a few weeks with them?

#51

Davei141 said:
I am not assuming they are hardening, i can see and feel the evidence. Plenty of callouses but as i said callouses aren't/weren't the problem. The problem was i did get tears and pretty bad tears at that from one rep, i was not used to that weight or the olympic bar and in turn i wouldn't of been able to repeatedly deadlift for few a weeks had i not stuck the gloves on.


Gladly. You said you have been to callous city, what did you do when you got multiple tears on your hands? Did you repeatedly deadlift for a few weeks with them?


ah ya!! i've bled all over countless bars(and no it wasnt my TOM). suck it up man

kevpants Registered User
#52

Davei141 said:


Gladly. You said you have been to callous city, what did you do when you got multiple tears on your hands? Did you repeatedly deadlift for a few weeks with them?


Just let them heal. How long between your deadlift sessions? If it's once a week, all but the worst tear should be pretty ok within a week. If not, just skip a week. 2 weeks off will have it healed right up. You aren't going to be skipping them all the time this is just to get used to things. The effect of cycling damaging your hands with letting them heal is what is going to put the hard skin on them.

Davei141 Registered User
#53

I guess the problem was i was deadlifting 3 times a week mainly due to not having access to a squat rack (home gym) Basically replacing squats with deads. I now have the squat rack so am cutting back on the deadlift sessions dramatically which in turn will give the hands time to heal effectively. I guess the gloves were what was most convenient at the time to keep me training

floggg Registered User
#54

Davei141 said:
I guess the problem was i was deadlifting 3 times a week mainly due to not having access to a squat rack (home gym) Basically replacing squats with deads. I now have the squat rack so am cutting back on the deadlift sessions dramatically which in turn will give the hands time to heal effectively. I guess the gloves were what was most convenient at the time to keep me training


I imagine deadlifting heavy thrice weekly would not be could for you. Deadlifts put a serious amount of stress on CNS, and as far as i knew took you more than two days to recover fully from (correct me if i'm wrong).

Black Swan Category Moderator
#55

Compromise? Use leather gloves to protect palms with exposed fingers for grip?

IIMII Registered User
#56

kevpants said:

2). You eventually get to the point where you miss deadlifts because you keep dropping the bar rather than fail to lock it out and you ditch the gloves and your sub 100kg soft hands get torn to shreds by the new bigger weight.

Same with grip sports like hurling. When you start (or start up again after a break) your skin gets torn to shreds. You give your hands a break for a few days and start again. You could use your bare hands to lift and then give them a rest for a few days by wearine gloves and take the gloves off again once they have healed a little. Anyway, the point I'm trying to make is when you use your hands for grip, you have to develop them to do the job. Like with strap supports, by avoiding an issue you can create more hassle for yourself down the road. I would develop my hands first, even if it means taking time out from using them whilst they toughen up

Davei141 Registered User
#57

floggg said:
I imagine deadlifting heavy thrice weekly would not be could for you. Deadlifts put a serious amount of stress on CNS, and as far as i knew took you more than two days to recover fully from (correct me if i'm wrong).


You are correct i would be absolutely shattered and probably went a bit backwards during it. Looking back wouldn't do it that much again, sometimes less is more.

rubadub Registered User
#58

Blue_Lagoon said:
Compromise? Use leather gloves to protect palms with exposed fingers for grip?

My main calluses are on my palm so it would still be covered by the glove. like the middle circle here


here is the beastskills page mentioned earlier
http://www.beastskills.com/calluses.htm

I use a stanley blade to get mine, you have to be very careful though, the beastskills is safer.

A gymnastic coach has more tips
Probably the most over-used part of a gymnast's body are his hands. Rips, blisters and torn calluses are an unfortunate fact of everyday life for us. Over the years I have tried many methods of dealing with them.

First and foremost of these is reasonable moderation. Rome wasn't built in a day and neither will your calluses be. You would like to work up to the edge of a rip, but not over that edge into an actual rip. It takes much longer to heal an injury and completely re-grow new callus than to add another layer to an old. Also don't discount the negative impact unnecessary rips will have on your training.

The most efficient method that we have found to promote new callus growth is simple but rather painful. It is also an excellent way to promote callus health when you hands are simply "hot".

1) Remove the torn callus; trimming as closely to the edge of the wound as comfortably possible.

2) Smooth the edges of the wound with either a razor blade (proceed slowly!) or a pumice stone. These are available in handled versions as foot callus scrappers at all drug stores.

3) Now soak your torn callus in a bowl of water super-saturated with salt (to supersaturate continue adding salt to a warm container of water until the salt in no longer able to continue dissolving and you have a small amount of undissolved salt in the bottom) several times a day for at least 10 minutes.

Initially this may be quite painful. How painful will depend on the depth of the rip. If it is a very deep "bloody" rip, you are in for an interesting experience. :shock: It is necessary however, as we need to encourage the growth of callus immediately, rather than new soft pink skin that will simply re-tear right away anyway. Unless the blister is unusually deep, in one to two days it should be mostly healed - compared to the 5-7 days needed for conventional treatments.

4) Use just enough medicated chapstick (my personal choice as you can easily carry it in your pocket) to prevent drying to such an extent that the rip cracks. Do not however use Neosporin or something similar; in my experience the use of these type of products will promote the growth of new skin rather than a protective sheath of callus.


I only tore a callus once on monkey bars, that is a lot of movement so is a bit different. You will see gymnasts use "grips".


There is stuff called titegrip, it has antiperspirant and chalk and other stuff. You can get that antiperspirant in chemists, called driclor or perspirex, it is amazingly strong stuff.

(warning picture of a pole dancer on the home page!)
http://www.tite-grip.com/

Also the label on the liquid chalk I saw seemed to be just alcohol and chalk, you could probably make your own, but it needs to be high % alcohol so it dries off quickly.

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