• Climate getting progressively cooler through next solar cycles (45.28%)
  • No impact (21.93%)
  • Global warming is here to stay (15.86%)
  • Calm before the solar storm of 2012-2013 (16.93%)
Elmer Blooker Registered User
#646

dolanbaker said:
The Earth's magnetic field is the main line of protection from external radiation reaching the surface.
Sunspots are simply an indication of how active the sun's magnetic field is, and the sun's field enhances the Earth's magnetic field.

So therefore a lower magnetic field around the sun will result in a weaker field around the Earth which means less protection from radiation = more cosmic rays.

"Less protection" meaning what for us mere mortals? There may be disruption to electronics as gctest pointed out but I think we'll survive like we have done before during deep solar minima.

dolanbaker Moderator
#647

Small increases in risk of things line skin cancer and other radiation related issues.

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Say my name Registered User
#648

Increases in cloud cover from more cosmic rays. So basically heavier rain in the low pressure systems and even as some say more lightning strikes from thunderstorms from cosmic ray seeding.

https://phys.org/news/2016-08-solar-impact-earth-cloud.html

sryanbruen Registered User
#649

The quietest sun since 2009

The sun is blank today for the 15th straight day which is the longest stretch without sunspots since November 2009 when the sun was emerging from the deepest solar minimum in a century. This year the sun has been blank 52% of the time which is the most in a given year since the 71% that took place in 2009. The last solar minimum actually reached a nadir in 2008 when an astounding 73% of the year featured a spotless sun - the most spotless days in a given year since 1913 - and the longest consecutive streak in 2008 reached 52 days according to spaceweather.com. All indications are that the upcoming solar minimum may even be even quieter than the last one.


https://www.perspectaweather.com/blog/2018/7/12/1140-am-the-quietest-sun-since-2009

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sryanbruen Registered User
#650

Yesterday, we equalled 2017's number of spotless days and now there is 105 spotless days in 2018. Currently, there has been 18 consecutive days without any sunspots.

This image is from yesterday.



http://www.spaceweather.com/

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sryanbruen Registered User
#651

THREE WEEKS WITHOUT SUNSPOTS: The sun has been blank for 21 days--3 whole weeks without sunspots. To find an equal number of consecutive spotless days in the historical record, you have to go back to July-August 2009 when the sun was emerging from an unusually deep solar minimum. Solar minimum, welcome back!

Spotless Days
Current Stretch: 21 days
2018 total: 108 days (55%)
2017 total: 104 days (28%)
2016 total: 32 days (9%)
2015 total: 0 days (0%)
2014 total: 1 day (<1%)
2013 total: 0 days (0%)
2012 total: 0 days (0%)
2011 total: 2 days (<1%)
2010 total: 51 days (14%)
2009 total: 260 days (71%)
2008 total: 268 days (73%)
2007 total: 152 days (42%)
2006 total: 70 days (19%)

http://www.spaceweather.com/archive.php?view=1&day=18&month=07&year=2018

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sryanbruen Registered User
#652

July 2018 had the lowest monthly sunspot number since August 2009.

The blue line is every month's sunspot number from January 2006 to July 2018 whilst the red line is the 13 month running average for sunspot numbers.



Data comes from SILSO.

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BLIZZARD7 Registered User
#653

10 consecutive days on the blink now -



From Spaceweather.com:

SOLAR MINIMUM CONDITIONS ARE IN EFFECT: The sun has been without sunspots for 44 of the past 47 days. To find a similar stretch of blank suns, you have to go back to 2009 when the sun was experiencing the deepest solar minimum in a century. Solar minimum has returned, bringing extra cosmic rays, long-lasting holes in the sun's atmosphere, and strangely pink auroras.

Will be interesting to see how this affects the winter, if at all...

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Elmer Blooker Registered User
#654

...... and some of the days when the sun is "active" is dubious in my opinion.
I found this in the archives - July 22nd was a day when the sun was considered "active"? Sunspot 2716 is so tiny its invisible but it says current stretch: 0 days!
http://www.spaceweather.com/archive.php?view=1&day=22&month=07&year=2018

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BLIZZARD7 Registered User
#655

Another day blank and Solar flux is down to 68 from 70 yesterday, 132 days blank so far, should push easily above 200 by years end.

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dolanbaker Moderator
#656

Elmer Blooker said:
...... and some of the days when the sun is "active" is dubious in my opinion.
I found this in the archives - July 22nd was a day when the sun was considered "active"? Sunspot 2716 is so tiny its invisible but it says current stretch: 0 days!
http://www.spaceweather.com/archive.php?view=1&day=22&month=07&year=2018

Days like that would have certainly been marked as blank in the past.

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