delllat Registered User
#1

I love white french style baguettes and eat them daily

I have tried brown breads of various types and always drift back to the "whiter" breads of tescos bakery

I have heard some brown breads are basically white bread "dyed" to make it look darker and have no health benefits at all

also rolls covered in various seeds are delicious

is white bread and rolls really so bad ?

which types of brown bread are best?

I have tried that really heavy dark german bread they sell in lidl and aldi and i didnt like it so went back to my normal bread agfter a few weeks

Khannie Make your dreams happen
#2

White bread is pure sh*te. Baguettes are shockin' (they have a very high GI value, resulting in a big spike in insulin levels).

To answer your question: I eat brennans wholegrain (mostly) or McCambridges (sometimes) but I wouldn't each much bread at all.

#3

i eat brown pittas from aldi...for the simple reason ya can slice em open fit a chicken and and some fish in there and hey presto home made protien bar

#4

delllat said:
I love white french style baguettes and eat them daily

I have tried brown breads of various types and always drift back to the "whiter" breads of tescos bakery

I have heard some brown breads are basically white bread "dyed" to make it look darker and have no health benefits at all

also rolls covered in various seeds are delicious

is white bread and rolls really so bad ?

which types of brown bread are best?

I have tried that really heavy dark german bread they sell in lidl and aldi and i didnt like it so went back to my normal bread agfter a few weeks


Thunders in Phibsboro and drumcondra do a great Lo-Gi brown bread, cant stop eating it

hooplah Registered User
#5

I don't eat much bread anymore but usually have some in the freezer if I decide I want toast or literally have nothing to make a dinner out of.

To be honest I think most supermarket bread is muck - check out the amount of salt and e numbers in the ingredients. I'll usually buy a granary or wholemeal loaf from a local bakery and get them to slice it. Its much nicer than supermarket bread and cheaper too. If you don't have a neighbourhood bakery you could try the 'la brea' range from some Tesco's - its pricey but delicious and isn't full of additives.

Oh yeah, I'll usually have some pitta bread in the freezer too - just because its so handy.

billyhead Registered User
#6

Folks,

I have a liking for bread also (for my peanut butter sandwhiches more then anything else) and usually get the Lifeforce Hi Fibre bread. I was just wondering is this muck and if so what other supermarket brands are good alternatives

cozmik Banned
#7

hooplah said:


To be honest I think most supermarket bread is muck -


You are right!!

You get good bread in health shops.

Reyman Registered User
#8

delllat said:
I love white french style baguettes and eat them daily



Appaling junk! Mostly reheated stale bread if the truth be known.

Leave it in the kitchen for a few hours then use it as truncheon for any burglars or the like that come into the house.
As Khannie says - McCambridges or Brennans is fine. But wholemeal only. Stay away from the 'wholegrain' - it's another of these 'Irish misnomers'. A bit like a successful Irish bank.

WolfForager Registered User
#9

Homemade brown bread please. I eat multi-seed brown rolls (opinons on that guys?) aswell. For toast etc, brennans brown is your only man

Bog Butter Registered User
#10

I have, upon the advice of those on this forum, given up bread altogether. It has helped me to give up butter and has helped me to stop eating to much. It also stops me feeling bloated, I actually didn't know I was bloated until I stopped eating bread, I suppose I just took it for granted. Not eating bread/sandwiches has forced me to eat more fresh foods. I have increased my vedge intake. Porrige in the morning and my fruit vedge during the day is the only carb intake now. I'm surprised at how long I stay full with just vedge and fish. I have given up red meat as well. I just stick to fish and chicken now but fish mostly.

rubadub Registered User
#11

Reyman said:
As Khannie says - McCambridges or Brennans is fine. But wholemeal only. Stay away from the 'wholegrain'
I think the grain/meal depends on the brand. Brennans wholegrain is wheat flour as the main ingredient, I suspect some wholemeals might be the same. If it is 100% they will usually shout about it on the packet, even mcCambridges has wheat flour in it, though it is down the list (ingredients are listed in order of greatest first).

I think some bakeries will grow the yeast using wheatflour, therefore it gets listed on the packet, even though little is really in it.

I remember getting some tesco brown bread and it was not mixed correctly, it had big "marbley" bits of white & brown in it. But I think some other tesco brown is "real".

I gave up buying sliced pans this year, just sticking with ryvitas.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whole_grain

Whole-meal products are made from whole-grain flour....

Whole grain products can be identified by the ingredient list. Typically, if the ingredient lists "whole wheat," "wholemeal," or "whole corn" as the first ingredient, the product is a whole-grain food item. On the other hand, terms such as "enriched" and "bromated," among others, could indicate that the food lacks whole grain.[1]

"Wheat flour" (as opposed to "whole-grain wheat flour" or "whole-wheat flour") as the first ingredient is not a clear indicator of the product's whole grain content. If two ingredients are listed as grain products but only the second is listed as whole grain, the entire product may contain between 1% and 49% whole grain.[1] Many breads are colored brown (often with molasses) and made to look like whole grain, but are not. In addition, some food manufacturers make foods with whole-grain ingredients, but, because whole-grain ingredients are not the dominant ingredient, they are not whole-grain products. Contrary to popular belief, fiber is not indicative of whole-grains. The amount of fiber varies from grain to grain, and some products may have things like bran, peas, or other foods added to boost the fiber content.[2]

In Canada, it is legal to advertise any food product as "whole wheat" with up to 70% of the germ removed.[3] While the resulting product will contain the benefit of fiber in the nutritional information, it lacks the more recently-discovered health benefits of antioxidants found in the wheat germ. Canadian consumers can be assured of whole-grain products by a label stating 100% whole grain whole wheat.

Whole grains are often more expensive than refined grains because their higher oil content is susceptible to rancidification, complicating processing, storage, and transport.

Similar to the distinction between whole and refined grains is that between whole pulses and refined dal.



In some other post somebody mentioned pasta cooked al dente would have a lower GI what overcooked pasta. Same seems true of the milled wholemeal vs wholegrain. The grains taking longer to digest.

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1834634

Just read the packs!

Al_Fernz Registered User
#12

I'm going to go against the grain here a bit (did you see what I did there) and say the whole white/brown bread debate is really irrelevant for most people. The differences in blood sugar levels after eating white and brown are pretty small - especially if the person is eating other food with it.

OP: I think you should look at your overall intake of bread and carbs in general, before looking at whether it is wholegrain or not.

Beau Registered User
#13

Hovis Granary.

Cole Registered User
#14

malman said:
It also stops me feeling bloated, I actually didn't know I was bloated until I stopped eating bread


I stopped eating bread for a while also, but then I discovered ABC (Alternative Bread Company) Multigrain and Seed in Dunnes Stores..lovely and don't get that bloated feeling.

AARRRGH Banned
#15

hooplah said:
To be honest I think most supermarket bread is muck - check out the amount of salt and e numbers in the ingredients.


I know, I am always amazed by this. I was in Dunnes the other day and I wanted to buy some healthy bread. I was looking at all the "healthy option" type breads, you know, the ones that are packaged and marketed as healthy, and I was quite amazed at how ****ty the ingredients were!

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