-mr.x- Banned
#1

anyone doing or finished business in U.L .
is it a good course

Yillan Registered User
#2

Business is never a good course

tinhat

Mossin Registered User
#3

Yillan said:
Business is never a good course


Thats very unhelpful, and a ridiculous statement!

-mr.x- said:
anyone doing or finished business in U.L .
is it a good course


I'm currently in 4th year of the old BBS course along with Ninty9er and DJCR.
There are quite a number of others currently doing the new BBS course.

I can comment a little on the new course as I covered a lot of the same modules in my course.

Its an interesting course, which gives you a taste of Marketing, Accounting, HR, Economics and Insurance and Risk in your first 2 years, and then you can choose which you want to major in.
Its very broad and some may say its too vague blah blah...but trust me, its an excellent course overall.

I went the Marketing major route, and I'm loving it.

There are usually over 450 people who start BBS in 1st year and as such people tend to think its an easy course, but its not. The drop out rate is about 18% in both 1st and 2nd year. Its not a course for dossers.

-mr.x- Banned
#4

thanks

nouveau_4.0 Registered User
#5

Mossin said:
Thats very unhelpful, and a ridiculous statement!


I'm currently in 4th year of the old BBS course along with Ninty9er and DJCR.
There are quite a number of others currently doing the new BBS course.

I can comment a little on the new course as I covered a lot of the same modules in my course.

Its an interesting course, which gives you a taste of Marketing, Accounting, HR, Economics and Insurance and Risk in your first 2 years, and then you can choose which you want to major in.
Its very broad and some may say its too vague blah blah...but trust me, its an excellent course overall.

I went the Marketing major route, and I'm loving it.

There are usually over 450 people who start BBS in 1st year and as such people tend to think its an easy course, but its not. The drop out rate is about 18% in both 1st and 2nd year. Its not a course for dossers.




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gDW_Hj2K0wo

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ImDave Registered User
#6

Mossin said:
Thats very unhelpful, and a ridiculous statement!


+1

I would agree with Mossin 100% on everything he has said there. I am in 3rd year of the BBS (out on co-op now), so the first year of the new course, and have to say it is a very good course overall. I am doing the Accounting and Finance major with Entrepreneurship minor (which is class). There are a few modules over the past three years that one may question the relevance of, but this will be the case in the vast majority of courses in uni., but none the less most modules are excellent.

The class size, which ultimately leads to didactic lectures being the only feasible option for teaching the majority of the course content is the only thing I dislike, but it doesn't present an overwhelming problem, particularly if you are comfortable with such a style of learning.

Overall I would not hesitate to recommend the course to anyone, but would say only do the course if you are prepared to do a bit of work and have some, even a vague, interest in business.

Peteee Moderator
#7

Yillan said:
Business is never a good course

tinhat

Careful now.

If your going to mock a course, please be funny at the very least.

Rowley Birkin QC Registered User
#8

I started doing business in UL in 2002, absolutely hated it.

The size of the lectures were ridiculous, the content was horribly bland and I generally didn't enjoy it. I liked business in school but found the 3rd level course mind-numbing.

Just finished doing my final year exams in Town Planning in Bolton St. and couldn't be happier. Apart from the recession business obviously.

Mossin Registered User
#9

bigkev49 said:
I started doing business in UL in 2002, absolutely hated it.

The size of the lectures were ridiculous, the content was horribly bland and I generally didn't enjoy it. I liked business in school but found the 3rd level course mind-numbing.

Just finished doing my final year exams in Town Planning in Bolton St. and couldn't be happier. Apart from the recession business obviously.


Business isnt for everybody, and just because you liked it in secondary school doesnt necessarily mean that you will like it at 3rd level.

You would have been doing the old BBS course which I am doing.
It is difficult to adjust to the large lecture size and some of the content in 1st year, but it gets better, and who knows, if you had stayed at it maybe you would have enjoyed it and found that its not bland at all

Rowley Birkin QC Registered User
#10

Mossin said:
Business isnt for everybody, and just because you liked it in secondary school doesnt necessarily mean that you will like it at 3rd level.

You would have been doing the old BBS course which I am doing.
It is difficult to adjust to the large lecture size and some of the content in 1st year, but it gets better, and who knows, if you had stayed at it maybe you would have enjoyed it and found that its not bland at all


Have to say I doubt that, but as you say it's not for everybody.

Still in contact with people who finished the course and I'm nearly asleep listening to their job descriptions. The size of the course really was an issue for me, zero interaction or personal relationships with lecturers, more akin to a factory churning out huge numbers of degrees every year than a learning experience IMHO.

Just recommending that the OP look into this course further before choosing it.

Yillan Registered User
#11

bigkev49 said:
Have to say I doubt that, but as you say it's not for everybody.

Still in contact with people who finished the course and I'm nearly asleep listening to their job descriptions. The size of the course really was an issue for me, zero interaction or personal relationships with lecturers, more akin to a factory churning out huge numbers of degrees every year than a learning experience IMHO.

Just recommending that the OP look into this course further before choosing it.


With complete disregard for my first post on this thread, isn't business the same everywhere, as regards huge class sizes?

To be honest, I'd recommend UL as the best place to do anything, especially something like business, which can end up being a 'token degree' elsewhere. From UL you actually do have to work for the degree and I think this is recognised by employers.

UL or Trinity, for its reputation abroad alone

dragonfly! Registered User
#12

Did you go to the open day? FOund it v helpful when I was at it in 07

nouveau_4.0 Registered User
#13

Yillan said:
With complete disregard for my first post on this thread, isn't business the same everywhere, as regards huge class sizes?

To be honest, I'd recommend UL as the best place to do anything, especially something like business, which can end up being a 'token degree' elsewhere. From UL you actually do have to work for the degree and I think this is recognised by employers.

UL or Trinity, for its reputation abroad alone

LOL, thats a lie and you know it.

Mossin Registered User
#14

nouveau_4.0 said:
LOL, thats a lie and you know it.


If you want a 1st class honours then thats not a lie!
I glided through 1st and 2nd year by putting in feck all effort, and lads here can testify to how much I went out and how little I did college wise, but I always managed to do the required work and passed my exams in good stead.
My XBOX was overused in those years.

But since 3rd year I've put in savage effort, and if results go my way I could be looking at a 1:1 this year.

Rineanna Registered User
#15

Hi Mr. X,

I'm currently in third year Business too, so, like a previous poster, out on co-op at the moment.

The course has its advantages and disadvantages. I won't lie, there are aspects of it I'm not mad about, but, in general, its good points outweigh its bad ones from an educational point of view.

First of all, the very fact that its such a broad course illustrates its good points and bad points. You get a well rounded perspective on everything business-wise, obviously. I had very little interest in accounting coming into 1st year; didn't do it for the LC, hated the book-keeping part of JC business apart from the P&L stuff. However, there are three obligatory accounting modules in the course (Financial, Managerial and & Financial info analysis), so every person, whether they were a person who loved the HR/Marketing side of things or someone able to construct a set of accounts in two minutes flat, you studied these modules. There isn't a problem if you're crap at accounting because they teach the syllabus with the very fact that there is an anti-accounting sub-culture within the course . I am so glad I studied these modules, even though I'm a Marketing major, as I'm using techniques and skills learned while studying them everyday on co-op in my marketing position. Plus, I'd rank Finanacial Information Analysis as one of my top five favourite modules so far, partially down to an excellent lecturer and secondly because it was so relevant to all the turmoil in the national and global economy currently. On the other hand, you do come accross a few, not many, but a couple of modules which you have no interest in and on which you would rather not have to do exams. You get over it though, as long as you put the effort in to compensate for the lack of interest. This could be avoided if you were to study a more specialised course (say, Economics and Sociology, which would cut out the HR, Marketing and Insurance stuff). It really depends on what you want to do at the other end but despite its drawbacks, I'm happy to have experienced so many facets of the business world.

Just before I go on, there are a few ill-informed naysayers (not just on this board) who love throwing around ridiculous comments on the 'Business Degree' that you graduate with, the statistics do speak for themselves. IIRC, the numbers employed one year on in posts relevant to their degrees stood definitely within the 90%-100% bracket, with the majority of the remainder in postgraduate studies and something like 3% unemployed. I stand to be corrected on those figures as I don't have the actual ones in front of me, but that's what I remember from memory. Despite what it may appear like, I'm not just trumpeting my own course for the sake of it; indeed,there were times at the very beginning where I was disillusioned with it, but I'm glad I endured.

bigkev49
The size of the lectures were ridiculous


Err..yeah they're huge, but as Yillan pointed (and I'm suprised someone had to point it out), business courses are always gigantic, compared to some courses which might only have less than 10 or 20 students. This, or so I thought, was pretty much common knowledge. I, and everyone I know in the course, knew this before we started or even put it on the CAO, even when we were in secondary school. The places for each course are listed in the prospectus and are pretty much available with very little research, so I don't understand how you wouldn't have known this before picking it, and why, if you did know its size, was it such an issue?

bigkev49
Still in contact with people who finished the course and I'm nearly asleep listening to their job descriptions


What?
This perplexes me somewhat. Given the fact you picked the course, I would imagine you had an idea as to the type of jobs you'd be getting into when you completed it. So, it's pretty obvious you didn't have any sincere interest in Business, aside from the superficial aspects of it, if you find the job descriptions of people who actually graduated sleep-enducing. A little research prior to picking the course wouldn't have gone astray, to be honest.

zero interaction or personal relationships with lecturers


Ok. I have to ask. Do you have any genuine arguments against the course or are you, like many others, just lambasting the course because it's an easy target due to its size?

That zero interaction malarky is nonsense. I have had extensive interactions with several of my lecturers. Yes, it's probably more difficult to achieve than in other courses, but, in all fairness, all it takes (God forbid) is a little effort. You take from the course what you put into it, and if you endeavour to interact and build a relationship (strictly platonic, of course ) with your lecturers, then it will happen. Let's not forget that the semesters with 100% 'common' modules (i.e. 300-400 students) is only for the first three semesters out of a total of seven semesters on campus. From the second half of 2nd year, you split into your major and minor options, meaning smaller , more manageable classes.

Bigkev49, I know it looks like I'm picking holes with every thing you say (and, well, maybe I am), and I'm sure you had genuine reasons for leaving, but the reasons you've stated don't wash AT ALL with me. They certainly aren't anything that a little research or effort would've solved by highlighting the fact that you weren't suited at all to the course.

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