#1

Just wondering if anyone can either confirm the law concerning the use of Metal Detectors in Ireland or give a link. Are they totally illegal? Does anyone have one? etc. I know that in the UK you can use them on land as long as you have the land owners permission and you can use them on the coast as long as it is below the high tide mark. I have always thought I'd like to get one, and with christmas approaching, a few hints in the right ear and you never know. I know you can buy them freely in any number of outlets in Ireland, but is it the same rule as scanners, that it is illegal to use them but not illegal to sell them? quite stupid IMO.

SPARTAN33 Registered User
#2

I have a viking v40 metal detector, i use it on private land grandparents land etc, but havent used it in a while only bought last year from the U.K. bought it for 400 euros, so its nealry new not muched used, would sell for 330 euros as it has cover for control box and disc cover as i bought those extra, i saw from your thread you were interested in buying one. Its a much better highter spec model thant the viking lower models than you get in some shops and to buy one here in the shops they charge very high prices for metal detectors.

#3

I can't think of any reason why they might be illegal.

The only issue would be if you are trespassing on private property or taking possessions (stealing).

Fuzzy Clam Registered User
#4

Firstly Vulcan, its not illegal to use a scanner in Ireland.
Secondly a quick search came up with this archive. http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/archive/index.php/t-2055175834.html

Might be of some help.

stapeler Registered User
#5

Here's a piece about a conviction in the midlands a few years ago. Do a google and you'll find a few related stories.



Metal detectors may lead to iron bars
By Cormac O’Keeffe

DO NOT buy or accept metal detectors as presents this Christmas or you could end up spending the new year in jail, an expert warned yesterday. And shops and manufacturers were told not to advertise metal detectors as they were making potential criminals of buyers. Antiquities expert Dr Ned Kelly made the comments yesterday as selected items from a hoard of 800 artifacts, which were recovered from thieves, were put on display at the National Museum. “We would advise people coming up to Christmas, not to give or receive metal detectors. “They run the risk of finding themselves before the courts, and even run the risk of imprisonment,” Dr Kelly said. It is illegal to dig for archeological objects and to use metal detectors for such a purpose without a special licence. Dr Kelly said advertisements were running in national papers promoting metal detectors, including junior versions for €12.50. The National Museum’s antiquities curator said one supermarket was also promoting them, unaware they were making potential criminals of buyers. Dr Kelly unveiled a number of items recovered from a massive artifact theft involving more than 800 items. These included a rare gold covered Christian mount from Lorrha, Co Tipperary, featuring a crucifix in a circular frame. The mount is thought to have an insurance value to up to €50,000. Other items on display were two Bronze Age daggers, an Iron Age pin, musket balls and hundreds of perfectly preserved coins with the month and the year of minting still visible. “We are giving people an opportunity to see this significant and important material.
Not to have documented it and the material collected would have been a significant loss,” said Dr Kelly. Anthony Molloy, a 68-year-old former Duchas employee, and his 44-year-old son Kevin, were last week found guilty at Birr District Court of being in the possession of archeological objects. Judge Michael Reilly gave them the probation act partly because they had co-operated fully with the National Museum. The court had heard that Anthony Molloy had been given a metal detector as a retirement present. The father and son went on to raid monastic sites and castles near their north Tipperary home. Dr Kelly advised people who have information on the use of metal detectors to contact the gardaí or the National Museum on 01-6777444.
http://www.examiner.ie/

robinph Moderator
#6

I think they are over doing it a bit in that article with all of the theft and raid type language. They seem to trying to make the two guys appear to be some hardened criminal gang up to no good. They were most likely only caught though once they eventually went along to some museum to enquire as to what one of the shiny things they had just found actually was.

#7

Thanks folks for the replies. I think that given the circumstances, I'll not be getting one anyway soon. FC, I see what you mean by scanners not being strictly illegal, but, they are only leagal as long as you use them for listening to public broadcasts or frequencies that you have permission to listen to. If you are found with a scanner with àny frequency other than those saved, you can be done for it.

cable842 Banned
#8

vulcan I wouldnt let all that put me off ever kid growing up wants and have always wanted a Metal Detector.

Reading all the facts there I still would love to buy one as long as your let the owner of the land know what your doing and if you do find stuff you hand it in too the museum.

Its being broadcast onm national geograhic today it happened last terry jones we'll call him and a farm made a deal where terry would scout his land and if he found anything they would spilt it.

Anyway Terry found gold last year and they handed it into the museum and gave them him and the farmer 3.25million tax free.

Saying that it took terry 6 years too find the gold.

Fighting Irish Registered User
#9

cable842 said:
vulcan I wouldnt let all that put me off ever kid growing up wants and have always wanted a Metal Detector.

Reading all the facts there I still would love to buy one as long as your let the owner of the land know what your doing and if you do find stuff you hand it in too the museum.

Its being broadcast onm national geograhic today it happened last terry jones we'll call him and a farm made a deal where terry would scout his land and if he found anything they would spilt it.

Anyway Terry found gold last year and they handed it into the museum and gave them him and the farmer 3.25million tax free.

Saying that it took terry 6 years too find the gold.


Saxon Gold was the name of that docu

cable842 Banned
#10

yeah that was it I think I watched it 4 times on easter sunday. there was noting else on.

we took down the name of the metal detector.

but they prob let you see the name for advertisment.

there is no way he was using that exact same one.....

IrlCasey Registered User
#11

Have a look at these two boards, some interesting information on them (the are not the same)

http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2055672868&highlight=metal+detectors


http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2055869919&highlight=metal+detectors

Just dont ask Grimmes where to buy one as he will have you tracked down and shot at dawn!!!

Dave Sherry Registered User
#12

I work for RTE and I am looking to contact people interested in using metal detectors as a hobby.
Is there anyone that would be available to talk about it?

#13

Sean_K said:
I can't think of any reason why they might be illegal.

The only issue would be if you are trespassing on private property or taking possessions (stealing).


The law states that it is ILLEGAL to search for objects which may have an archaeological or historical value without government permission.
Archaeologists rarely if ever use metal detectors when excavating. They're used in planning and surveying stages instead.

My lecturer told a story of an archaeologist who lost her watch while digging in a field. The team couldnt use detectors to find it because of the negative connotations it might give to the community.

Id say for backyard curiosities its just fine. But if you find anything interesting call the guards and they'll take it from there.

watty Registered User
#14

They are really only legitimate for looking for something dropped on beach or finding where the pipe is that you need to digup. Gas or Water mains digging up people use them.

You don't even have Mineral rights in your own back yard!

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Tordelback Registered User
#15

The long and the short of it is that you require an individual Detection Device License to be issued for each and every time you plan to go metal detecting with the intention of finding any kind of historical object - and the law assumes that that is what you are doing whenever you are using a metal detector. Archaeologists do use metal detectors in field work but they also have to apply for and be granted a licence each time - in addition to the licence they require for each an every dig they do.

In considering your application the National Monuments Service will consider your research design, qualifications, expertise and funding for conserving anything you find (which also requires a separate licence) , and a declaration that anything you do find is the property of the National Museum. You'll also need to prepare a report on your findings.

You can download the application form (NMS 2-06) on this page: http://www.archaeology.ie/en/PublicationsFormsLegislation/

Note also the condition on that form:

A consent to use a detection device does not include permission to dig for archaeological objects. If digging or the recovery of archaeological objects is envisaged, a separate excavation licence must be applied for (see Form NMS 1-06).

Good luck.

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