stretchaq Registered User
#1

could anyone explain to me how exactly shrimp fishing for salmon is done and how to use a shrimp pin?

coolwings Moderator
#2

If you want to float fish (long trotting) a shrimp you can mount it straight or curved.
The curved method is by threading it onto a large single hook, or by binding a large single to it with very fine copper wire.
The bent mounting method will corkscrew on a hold back or retrieve, so it suits drifting at water speed.

The straight mount method works best when the shrimp has to "swim" against the flow. This occurs when the float is "held back" causing the drifted bait to swim against the flow and rise as it does so.

If the shrimp is straightened out, and a needle or pin inserted up the tail, and along inside the body it will remain straight. Now it can be held back more naturally.
A straightened shrimp can be spun or sink-draw retrieved, if a shot is placed up the line to keep it down at the required level. It may spin slightly, but it is now an axial spin like a devon minnow but slower, and this is attractive, although I think it's better if I can mount it so there is no spin and the shrimp's appearance is as visible as possible.
To mount it this way, pull off the two side tail fins, they stick out when retrieving. Straighten it, stick the pin or needle in under the centre tail fin, up the body, so it remains straight. Lay the line along the belly, with the single, double, or treble concealed under the legs. Wind some very thin ( as a hair) copper wire from the tail to the head, and back again. Take three or four locking turns with the wire, binding the centre tail fin to the line, and snap the end off. That's it.

stretchaq Registered User
#3

thanks for that anyone know where i would get a diagram of this??

coolwings Moderator
#4

Straight (with pin) for presentation while retrieving


Bent (no pin) for static or drift at water speed


Cast out under a float and let it drift through salmon lies with depth set at eye level or higher (relative to the fish), or just spin it.

Shrimp is not always allowed. So check out the rules where you fish. Pretended ignorance is no protection.

The reason shrimp or prawns are banned in many places is a result of the effect they have on the salmon they don't catch, putting them off the take, so no other method is effective either. Sometimes they even move fish away out of the pool for good. This ruins the fishing in that pool for a prolonged period.
Also treble hooks or tandem singles are banned in many places for conservation reasons.
Finally the shrimp fished at the end of the season, is effective at catching stale, salmon preparing to spawn. Not a good idea.

I have come to the conclusion that if a shrimp is cast properly into a known inhabited salmon lie, at a taking time, the first cast will catch the fish if shrimp is on. If no take occurs on the first cast, then change to another bait or lure immediately and stop ruining your fishing, you have already wasted good water for 20-30 yards around where that cast landed.
For this reason it is important that the first cast covers a known fish.

Anglers on big rivers like the Moy and Blackwater may have enough fish around to persist, and still have fishing due to new arrivals every hour.
But on a medium or smaller river the fishing of crustaceans by anglers ignorant of what they are doing can shut the fishing down until the next flood.
To put it another way, if I arrive and see an angler fishing large sized shrimp and not catching, I go to the pool downstream to seek the fish he just cleared out of his pool. The next place I will fish is the pool above him.

When they are on the shrimp, it is more effective than worms, but fish will be lost during play, due to fish nipping the bait and not taking it fully, thus getting lightly hooked, and the hook hold gives during play. So if they are equally on worm and shrimp, tactically you land more on worm.

A shrimp can be dangled in front of a visible fish for a long time, getting no attention and all of a sudden he will grab it.
This trick also works with flies dangled in front of fish, especially flies with mobile marabou wings or tails. Which makes the case that they see a fly as a kind of shrimp. If you can manipulate a flyrod really well to cast anywhere, fishing at any depth, and use these softwing, or hacklewing flies, they are almost as effective as shrimp.

7 people have thanked this post
famousfrog Registered User
#5

Anybody got any tips for fishing in the Danube. Off there tomorrow, hopefully to catch some big lads!!!

coolwings Moderator
#6

Huchen !!!! 50lb trout!! Don't forget your pike spinning gear. :-)

pullandbang Hosted Moderator
#7

coolwings said:
Straight (with pin) for presentation while retrieving
Bent (no pin) for static or drift at water speed
Cast out under a float and let it drift through salmon lies with depth set at eye level or higher (relative to the fish), or just spin it.

The reason shrimp or prawns are banned in many places is a result of the effect they have on the salmon they don't catch, putting them off the take, so no other method is effective either. Sometimes they even move fish away out of the pool for good. This ruins the fishing in that pool for a prolonged period.


Now that's what I call a post!

I always wondered why shrimp were banned and I could never get them to stay on my hook. I'm off to the Moy on Tuesday for the last days fishing but I'll probably be on worms although I might try some shrimp.
Great tip on watching others on the shrimp and fishing above or below them.

coolwings Moderator
#8

When the river is in a flood and it begins to fall, fish run and rest and spinning works best for the resting fish, and maybe runners temporarily paused in a glide or tail of a pool.
Then it falls and clears a bit more and fish begin to pool up.
At this stage fly and worm works best.
Then it drops a bit more and clears more and small flies perform. A single worm, or double of smallish worms can be good at this stage and the smallest shrimp is effective now.

The thin copper wire I use for my shrimps comes from the armature shaft of a tiny electric motor.

maigheo Registered User
#9

pull and bang the prawn is working well on the moy at the moment there is alot of fish throughout the system but there is no major take on. the single hook seems most popular it seems easier to hookthe fish. when im using it i insert the hook up the ass tread it about half way up the hook i force the point of the hook it out through the stomack so the prawn is straight on the hook one or two split shots on the trace will help keep the trace and prawn straight in the water for better presentation. if your buying some prawns i wouldn't reccomend either shops in Ballina as they are not of great quaility unless they got new stock in recently . prawns with eggs seem more effective but try not to damage them when puttig them on. the pin and treble is the easiest way to put them on but personally i perfer the single hook it takes some pratice and alot of prawns to get it right, in my opinion its the best way. best of luck and let us know how you get on.

2 people have thanked this post
pullandbang Hosted Moderator
#10

maigheo said:
best of luck and let us know how you get on.


Will do!

I'll be in Foxford probably in Rinaney fishery. I'm also going to try the bubble and fly. Last time I was there the keeper showed me how to set it up and tomorrow is going to be windy so there will be a good ripple.

pullandbang Hosted Moderator
#11

Just back an hour ago and I'm afraid I blanked. Met the keeper before I set off and he told me the water was too cloudy for the fly and shrimp and I'd be better off with worms or spinning.

Tried both but had no luck. Only about 14 anglers out - probably because of the conditions. There was a few fish caught - saw two lads with a fish each heading back to the car. Met a guy from Belfast who was there since last Monday and caught one fish in eight days of fishing. Mind you, he was delighted because it was his first salmon.

Saw a dead salmon come floating down the river belly up. Just as he passed me he geve a little shimmy, rolled over and swam away!

Anyway, that's that now for another year unless I get a chance to venture up to the Mourne at Sion Mills. They're open for another couple of weeks yet and it's a super river.

Kenwynn Products Registered User
#12

Hi, We supply dyed shrimps for fishing for salmon & have done so for over 35 years. Please email me at kenwynnproducts@yahoo.co.uk or visit our website: www.kenwynnproducts.com

We're based in Lincolnshire, England and can post to all of Ireland.

Tom7515 Registered User
#13

How do you set up the float rig for shrimping?

Compton Registered User
#14

from top to hook.

stop knot
8mm bead
float
swivel
18 inches of mono (with weight and bead underneath)
swicel
18 inches of mono
hook

Tom7515 Registered User
#15

Thanks.

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