72hundred Registered User
#1

Hey,

Just a quick (noob) question. I've a buckled wheel, with one or two very very slight buckles in it that I want repaired.

Roughly how much should will this cost? I've heard 10-15 should be the max.

Many thanks,

72oo

blorg Registered User
#2

That sounds about right. Bear in mind that buckles beyond a certain point cannot be fixed without replacing the rim. If they are slight as you say however you should be OK.

Gavin Registered User
#3

If you are that way inclined, it really is trivial to fix a minor buckle with a spoke key. You can get keys for less than 10 euro and then you always have it.

72hundred Registered User
#4

Verb said:
If you are that way inclined, it really is trivial to fix a minor buckle with a spoke key. You can get keys for less than 10 euro and then you always have it.


I really won't have the foggiest to get the tensions correct...

I came across Sheldon Brown's page on it. I guess I could give that avenue a go.

#5

If it's a slight buckle, then it's dead straightforward to fix it yourself. By a slight buckle, I'd consider it to be running mostly true, but perhaps hitting off a brake block on one side for a distance of a few spokes.

All you'll need to do is identify the location of the buckle (easy, cos that's probably where it's hitting the brake block). Then using your spoke spanner, if (as you're looking at it) the buckle is bending to the left, give the nipple for the spoke or two near the centre of the buckle a 1/4 or 1/2 turn tighten on the right side. Test it and do it again if necessary. Tightening the spoke/nipple will pull the rim back that way a bit.

When tightening the nipple with the tool, I just imagine what way the nipple screwed down onto the spoke and tighten it as if it was a normal nut.

I'd generally not exceed a 1/2 turn twist at any stage because a small change can make a surprisingly big difference with the buckle.

If I haven't explained it so well, let me know and I'll try again.

kenmc Registered User
#6

It's a bit like the Father Ted episode with the car for the raffle.
"It's no good, Ted. You'll never get it absolutely perfect"

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72hundred Registered User
#7

irishmotorist said:
If it's a slight buckle, then it's dead straightforward to fix it yourself. By a slight buckle, I'd consider it to be running mostly true, but perhaps hitting off a brake block on one side for a distance of a few spokes.

All you'll need to do is identify the location of the buckle (easy, cos that's probably where it's hitting the brake block). Then using your spoke spanner, if (as you're looking at it) the buckle is bending to the left, give the nipple for the spoke or two near the centre of the buckle a 1/4 or 1/2 turn tighten on the right side. Test it and do it again if necessary. Tightening the spoke/nipple will pull the rim back that way a bit.

When tightening the nipple with the tool, I just imagine what way the nipple screwed down onto the spoke and tighten it as if it was a normal nut.

I'd generally not exceed a 1/2 turn twist at any stage because a small change can make a surprisingly big difference with the buckle.

If I haven't explained it so well, let me know and I'll try again.



Yeah that helps alot thanks. I might give this a go alrite. Only thing is that the wheel's spokes aren't evenly space there's 20 grouped in 2's (see what I mean here: http://www.trekbikes.com/images/bikes/2008/xl/15_whitered.jpg ). I guess that doesn't make much of a difference.

72oo

72hundred Registered User
#8

kenmc said:
It's a bit like the Father Ted episode with the car for the raffle.
"It's no good, Ted. You'll never get it absolutely perfect"


Well it's rubbing the front right brake and just need to take 1 mm or so off it to stop if from rubbing and then I'd be happy - so I might be in a better predicament that poor old Father Ted!

72oo

blorg Registered User
#9

72hundred said:
Yeah that helps alot thanks. I might give this a go alrite. Only thing is that the wheel's spokes aren't evenly space there's 20 grouped in 2's (see what I mean here: http://www.trekbikes.com/images/bikes/2008/xl/15_whitered.jpg ). I guess that doesn't make much of a difference.
It does make a difference, paired spoke wheels have spokes at a very high tension and can be significantly more difficult to true. If the buckle is between the pairs of spokes you may be out of luck.

TBH I would consider bringing it to a shop, starting your wheel truing career on a paired spoke my not be the best idea.

#10

blorg said:
starting your wheel truing career on a paired spoke my not be the best idea.

I never had a shot at a wheel with a 'funny' spoke configuration, so that's fair enough.

The only other thing that I can think of is to get somebody heavy to stand on one side of the wheel and go with a lump hammer on the other side. That's a joke BTW...

72hundred Registered User
#11

blorg said:
It does make a difference, paired spoke wheels have spokes at a very high tension and can be significantly more difficult to true. If the buckle is between the pairs of spokes you may be out of luck.

TBH I would consider bringing it to a shop, starting your wheel truing career on a paired spoke my not be the best idea.


Ah crap, there goes that idea! Looks like its LBS so.

#12

I'd also be asking how did the wheel get buckled so soon?

72hundred Registered User
#13

penexpers said:
I'd also be asking how did the wheel get buckled so soon?


Well it was the choice of hitting a very sharp pothole (which also blew out the tube) or getting mashed by an artic truck that came up behind at speed. For some reason he though he needed to get as close as possible when overtaking despite there being no on-coming vehicles...

So the pothole seemed the better option!

blorg Registered User
#14

irishmotorist said:
The only other thing that I can think of is to get somebody heavy to stand on one side of the wheel and go with a lump hammer on the other side. That's a joke BTW...
I have actually read something not too far off that suggested for paired spoke rims, two blocks of wood and a hammer, not sure it actually was a joke either (indeed Zinn has a nice illustration for emergency buckle repairs in his book, featuring a cyclist bashing his wheel off a rock ). More particularly you may want a tensionmeter and to relieve tension in other spokes before attacking the problem. Note I've never trued a wheel of any sort so this is just going on what I have read.

penexpers said:
I'd also be asking how did the wheel get buckled so soon?
It happens, just like punctures, I've had buckles in all sorts of wheels, including handbuilts with Open Pro rims. I've had a pair of Bontrager Select paired spoke wheels that did me several thousand km without going out of true also.

I'd suggest though if it was a pothole you may well have a vertical dent in the rim (e.g. not just a sideways buckle) which is generally not fixable without rim replacement.

72hundred Registered User
#15

blorg said:

I'd suggest though if it was a pothole you may well have a vertical dent in the rim (e.g. not just a sideways buckle) which is generally not fixable without rim replacement.


Yeah I had one of those on a MTB, this doesn't look the same. This one is just slightly of place laterally. Fingers crossed it should be OK.

72oo

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