-Els- Registered User
#31

i went to Colaiste na Rosann in Anagaire in Donegal and its great. The thing i loved about it was that its in the villiage of anagaire and you can just walk to the shops and all the locals speak irish ad you really feel like you're in the gaeltacht. Also- the best thing ever- there was a chipper in the town (my Bean an Tí's cooking wasn't very good). They even spoke Gaeilge in the chipper!

The Colaiste is pretty good aswell-they brought us on loads of trips,which was cool beacuse friends of mine spent a lot of their time in other gaeltachts just playing football or volleyball all day. We used to go to the beach and go into Dungloe (nearest big town) and we went to Aranmore and climbed Mt Erigal.

scut Registered User
#32

any of the Galway ones

Mark200 Registered User
#33

I heard of Colaiste Lurgan off a lot of people here too, so it's probably good. I THINK that's where my brother went....

I went to one in Donegal, didn't really enjoy it that much at all but I DID learn quite a lot of Irish. Luckily I went with a friend who was there before because everyone already had their own little groups that they've known from other years there.

You should pick one that does a 3 week course, you'll learn so much more. 2 weeks doesn't really give you enough time to pick up things, but that extra week does.

Stilla Mellis Registered User
#34

Cad é an scéal is déanaí ón nGaeltacht? What's the latest from the Gaeltacht?

#35

Mark200 said:
I heard of Colaiste Lurgan off a lot of people here too, so it's probably good. I THINK that's where my brother went....

I went to one in Donegal, didn't really enjoy it that much at all but I DID learn quite a lot of Irish. Luckily I went with a friend who was there before because everyone already had their own little groups that they've known from other years there.

You should pick one that does a 3 week course, you'll learn so much more. 2 weeks doesn't really give you enough time to pick up things, but that extra week does.


Yeah I went to Colaiste Lurgan last summer. It was strict enough, well organised but there was a great atmosphere in the place. The only problem I had was there were more JCers than LCers. There is a cursa D though which is specifically for LCers, but it's only 2 weeks. Like most gaeltachts they have themed ceilithe like county colours, transvestite , certain colours, beach...etc. Also the colaiste owns bikes so each class can go cycling one day.

Stilla Mellis Registered User
#36

Suimiúil. Go raibh maith agat. June is generally the course for 5th years going into LC.

Anyone got any experience of these Gaeltacht Cois Baile courses? I heard there was one in Lucan or Leixlip and one in Dundrum?

Fad Moderator
#37

Bru Na Pairce.

One of major regrets of the LC is not going there.

2 weeks of hell, but fúck I'd have learned a helluva lot of Irish.

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Stilla Mellis Registered User
#38

Where's "Brú na Páirce"? It sounds like a live-in course? I heard my da talking about someplace in Meath called "Brú na Mí" and he seems to have had a great time.

Fad Moderator
#39

Stilla Mellis said:
Where's "Brú na Páirce"? It sounds like a live-in course? I heard my da talking about someplace in Meath called "Brú na Mí" and he seems to have had a great time.


Live in, in Kerry I think.

No info on the web afaik.

Fince Registered User
#40

90% is gonna be what you make of it yourself anyway.

Stilla Mellis Registered User
#41

True but if people in the Gaeltacht insist on speaking English to you because you wouldn't understand the Irish you might as well stay at home.

I think the idea of total immersion is great: you're surrounded by people speaking Irish who pretend they don't know English and follow a well-prepared series of situations where you learn all the vocabulary and grammar and use it over and over again. A few days of that and you'd be fluent in no time.

I think some of the Gaeltacht colleges bring in so many English speaking students that it is hard to hear any Irish outside the classroom never mind finding someone to practise with.

#42

Fad said:
Bru Na Pairce.

One of major regrets of the LC is not going there.

2 weeks of hell, but fúck I'd have learned a helluva lot of Irish.


Everybody I know who has been there has absolutely hated it. It's very intensive as you have classes in the morning and study in the evening for 2 weeks, except at the weekends. Bru does not foster a love for the language, like other Gaeltacht courses. If you want to learn a lot of Irish I would go to a strict Gaeltacht like Col. na bhfiann, Col. Chamuis or Col. Spleodar, which are known to be strict.

Fad Moderator
#43

djcervi said:
Everybody I know who has been there has absolutely hated it. It's very intensive as you have classes in the morning and study in the evening for 2 weeks, expect at the weekends. Bru does not foster a love for the language, like other Gaeltacht courses. If you want to learn a lot of Irish I would go to a strict Gaeltacht like Col. na bhfiann, Col. Chamuis or Col. Spleodar, which are known to be strict.


That's what I want from an Irish college, I already love the language, I'd prefer two weeks of hating it to the C I'm going to get in August.

Stilla Mellis Registered User
#44

I have heard of Coláiste na bhFiann and Coláiste Chamuis but Coláiste Spleodair is a new one on me. Spleodar means "cheerfulness, exuberance, boisterousnous, and vivacity" according to my dictionary.

Has anyone tried learning Irish online? Getting a grind online for example?

snazzy Registered User
#45

For anyone who did go to Bru na Pairce, did anyone have Mr. O Murcha/Mrs. Fleming as teachers?


I went to the Gaeltacht three times, all down to Cólaiste Chorca Dhubhine.
[spelling is already gone out the window]

Two years in Ceann Trá and one year up the road in Cill Mhic an Domhnaigh.
Had great fun.
Went on my own the first time in 2nd YR and while I HATED being there and the whole thing but I did learn a lot of Irish.

The last two times [4th Yr and 5th Yr] helped my Irish somewhat but was fantastic socially. Always bumping into people from IC now.
Biggest advantage, despite the fact that my written Irish and my comprehension of grammar didn't really improve, I loved speaking it no matter how wrong it sounded and it gave me a lovely flow of Irish in my oral.

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