bobbyjoe Registered User
#1

Chomsky is giving a lecture for Amnesty International in the RDS tomorrow.

Have researched him a bit on the web opinion ranges from genus to commie traitor. Thought manufacturing consent is a great book as is his one on 911.
He makes good arguements but seems to be the only person making them, except for maybe George Manibot.

Any opinions on him?

starn Registered User
#2

If anyone has a ticket for this. I will pay top dollar

shoutman Registered User
#3

do you have any information on the lexture?

Time, do you need a ticket etc. Presumably he will be talking about the abuse of human rights.

cheers

bobbyjoe Registered User
#4

shoutman
do you have any information on the lexture?

Time, do you need a ticket etc. Presumably he will be talking about the abuse of human rights.

cheers


I'd say all the tickets are gone. Amnesty members got priotity. The demand was so much they had to move it from Trinity to the RDS.


http://www.amnesty.ie/content/view/full/4635/

Described by The New Yorker as 'one of the greatest minds of the 20th century', Noam Chomsky will give the 2006 Amnesty Lecture in the Shelbourne Hall, RDS D.4 at 7pm on January 18th, the theme of which will be 'The War on Terror'.

Please note the change of venue.

Please be aware that all tickets for the Noam Chomsky lecture have now been allocated. You are welcome to contact us to enter your name on the waiting list.
Please be patient as we are handling an unprecedented number of calls and emails. In the event of cancellation by any of our members, your name will move up the list. Priority is still for Amnesty members.

Tickets will be sent by post on or before January 11th.

Amnesty International is filming the lecture and will make it available in due course. Recording or filming of the event is therefore not possible. We are in the process of making the lecture available on the web. For further details, please refer back to this web page, which will continue to be updated.

Goodshape Registered User
#5

shoutman
do you have any information on the lexture?

Time, do you need a ticket etc. Presumably he will be talking about the abuse of human rights.

cheers

AFAIR, it's free but because it's Chomsky booking was essential.

I myself failed to book

Snickers Man Registered User
#6

bobbyjoe
Chomsky is giving a lecture for Amnesty International in the RDS tomorrow.

Have researched him a bit on the web opinion ranges from genus to commie traitor. Thought manufacturing consent is a great book as is his one on 911.
He makes good arguements but seems to be the only person making them, except for maybe George Manibot.

Any opinions on him?


Only what I've read recently.

Richard Delevan wrote a very thought-provoking piece Anti-Chomsky piece in the Sunday Tribune a couple of weeks ago. Thought-provoking, only because it was so full of vitriol, describing all who might demur from accepted American wisdom concerning the 'War on Terror' as 'nipple-pierced Dalkey-reared skate rats' that it prompted one to investigate his claims using the power of Google.

Hardly surprisingly, Delevan was for the most part talking through his backside , as a lengthy letter to the editor published in the following week's paper made clear.

A much better piece appeared in the Times more recently which was fairer to Chomsky but offered the reasonable criticism that 'he's great at identifying wrongs but not so good at suggesting solutions.'

As a vocal critic of America's aggressive expansionist foreign policy and its consequent support for murderous regimes, as long as they're 'our' murderous regimes, he is regarded by many in the US as a traitor.

Others find him to be an articulate, eloquent and courageous example of the best in the American civic model, one who is constantly self-critical and demands that America live up to the noble standards set for its government in its Constitution and Laws.

I personally would rather Chomsky over any of those towel-head-hating, cheeseburger-arsed frat boys who infest the cable news channels, Weblogs and, occasionally, the opinion pages of Irish newspapers.

Ajnag Registered User
#7

A much better piece appeared in the Times more recently which was fairer to Chomsky but offered the reasonable criticism that 'he's great at identifying wrongs but not so good at suggesting solutions.'

I think that's part of it, Part of the problem with Chomsky is that his critics often offer nothing better then vitrol to challenge him. Another critism I find with chomsky is that he live's in a bubble to some extent, most of the questions put to him often only seek to enforce the dogma that surounds the various cause's attracted to him.

If anyone here do's go, think of something good if there is a q&a, Im sure he's probably sick of the same questions about how bad policys were etc, etc. He's probably dieing for a good argument

GypsumFantastic Registered User
#8

If you enjoy sly omissions, grave distortions, historical errors, fabricated quotes, and scholarly fakery, then Chomsky is certainly your man. I remember one infamous example where he cited *himself* as a source to back up his argument in one of his books.

No wonder historian Arthur Schlesinger called him 'an intellectual crook'.

Given his support for the totalitarianism of people like Pol Pot, and for Holocaust revisionists, then I would suggest that attributing his anti-US diatribes as being rooted in a noble belief in some US ideal is naive in the extreme.

sceptre Registered User
#9

starn
If anyone has a ticket for this. I will pay top dollar

This isn't the forum for requesting tickets. And even over on the FS Tickets section, paying more than face value (in this case nothing) isn't allowed either I'm afraid.

Just in case anyone else wants to use this as a ticket request thread, discussion thread is fine.

Lemming Registered User
#10

GypsumFantastic
If you enjoy sly omissions, grave distortions, historical errors, fabricated quotes, and scholarly fakery, then Chomsky is certainly your man. I remember one infamous example where he cited *himself* as a source to back up his argument in one of his books.

No wonder historian Arthur Schlesinger called him 'an intellectual crook'.

Given his support for the totalitarianism of people like Pol Pot, and for Holocaust revisionists, then I would suggest that attributing his anti-US diatribes as being rooted in a noble belief in some US ideal is naive in the extreme.


That's a fairly heft accusation. I assume that you do of course have linkage to support this accusation

Incidentally, is anyone else here going to the lecture?

bobbyjoe Registered User
#11

GypsumFantastic
If you enjoy sly omissions, grave distortions, historical errors, fabricated quotes, and scholarly fakery, then Chomsky is certainly your man. I remember one infamous example where he cited *himself* as a source to back up his argument in one of his books.

No wonder historian Arthur Schlesinger called him 'an intellectual crook'.

Given his support for the totalitarianism of people like Pol Pot, and for Holocaust revisionists, then I would suggest that attributing his anti-US diatribes as being rooted in a noble belief in some US ideal is naive in the extreme.



He seems to cite a lot more than your average political books must be the scientific training. Calling him anti-US etc seems to come from his opposition to the Iraqi war and American actions in Nicaragua and Guatemala. Also calling him pro-Pol Pot etc is simplistic, its the "your against the war in Iraq so you must support Saddam and think he's great" arguement.

Manic Moran Moderator
#12

The man is a self-described anarchist, with no greater qualifications in the realm of international (or domestic) politics than I do.

He may be a recognised genius in his professional field of linguistics, but I really think he receives far more attention than he deserves.

So how was the speech anyway?

NTM

#13

If you type Noam Chomsky into google it explodes!

I did find this amusing passage from his bio


In his 1973 book For Reasons of State, Chomsky argues that instead of a capitalist system in which people are "wage slaves" or an authoritarian system in which decisions are made by a centralized committee, a society could function with no paid labor. He argues that a nation's populace should be free to pursue jobs of their choosing. People will be free to do as they like, and the work they voluntarily choose will be both "rewarding in itself" and "socially useful". Society would be run under a system of peaceful anarchism, with no state or government institutions. Work that was fundamentally distasteful to all, if any existed, would be distributed equally among everyone.


Not to mention


Chomsky was more positive in his assessment of Communist movements in Asia, praising what he considered to be grassroots aspects of both Chinese and Vietnamese communism, such as in his 1968 essay, "Objectivity and Liberal Scholarship,", where he claimed there were "certain similar features" with the Spanish anarchist movement of the 1930s (which he greatly admires), while at the same time cautioning that "the scale of the Chinese Revolution is so great and reports in depth are so fragmentary that it would no doubt be foolhardy to attempt a general evaluation." In December 1967, while participating in a forum in New York, he said that in China "one finds many things that are really quite admirable", and that "China is an important example of a new society in which very interesting and positive things happened at the local level, in which a good deal of the collectivization and communization was really based on mass participation and took place after a level of understanding had been reached in the peasantry that led to this next step.


Of course saying this at the time of the Cultural Revoltion suggests Chomsky was'nt paying much attention.

Away with the fairies then...however the usual suspects will pack the place out and whoop and cheer in all the right places. I wonder if he'll do any media work (Late Late Show, Prime Time etc) while he's here?

Mike.

lostexpectation Registered User
#14

Manic Moran
The man is a self-described anarchist, with no greater qualifications in the realm of international (or domestic) politics than I do.

He may be a recognised genius in his professional field of linguistics, but I really think he receives far more attention than he deserves.
NTM


Isn't 3/4 of his lectuers here about linguistics etc, anyway, that's his day job.

i think some people are going to very disappointed if the go to the wrong lecture

SHAKESPEARE_SIS Registered User
#15

For those with no ticket for the Amnesty lecture - he's also in UCD tonight and over the coming days,

http://www.ucd.ie/news/jan06/011306_chomsky.htm

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