Saruman Registered User
#16

I just put the question to Johnnie Foxs themselves.. i sent an email so im curious to find out.. I also sent it to the Ray team at todayFM but have not heard a response or a thing on the radio yet.

Saruman Registered User
#17

I got a response from Fred at Johnnie Fox's. Pasting it below.

Dear Saruman;

Firstly, thank you for contacting us at Fox's Pub, it is nice to be given the opportunity to explain the long standing and often repeated question, "Which is the Highest Pub in Ireland"?

Ok without going into feet and inches just now, let me bring up the four areas that "claim" the title.
Ourselves of course, in Glencullen, there is another pub as you say in your message board in Glendalough area, in Roundwood, another on the Cork, Kerry border known as the Top of Croom and lastly another in Derry.

If I may work in reverse order to clarify our "claim":

4] Some time ago when I first launched Fox's TV advert in Ireland, Northern Ireland, England and mainland Europe, the advertising standards authority of Ireland contacted me with a complaint, now bear in mind this official watchdog has the power of authority to make a company remove its very expensive advert and lose any money spent on it, well anyway, they contacted stating they had complaints from Northern Ireland, specifically from a certain pub in "Londonderry", who stated that we were using false advertising, my response in brief, and I mean brief was simple.
"Johnnie Fox's claims to be the highest pub in Ireland, the term is used in accepted general terminology to pertain to the State of Ireland as opposed to the island of Ireland", I continued with by saying that "Derry was part of the 6 counties and therefore it is accepted in common day use and legally in advertising that our claim is substantiated and correct".
The response from ASAI was a written confirmation to our claim and permission to continue advertising, they had researched the claims from multiple parties and found in our favour.

3] The pub in Kerry is known to us and we to them on a more personal level, they are not open all year round nor in fact all day every day as one would expect from a public establishment, they do not have the interest in pursuing the "claim" with any energy and only a few occasions in the past have interacted on live radio debates with the other 3 establishments in a friendly banter to the height claim.

2] The longest running and loudest argument continues to this day with the pub in Roundwood, their claim is as the highest pub in the highest "VILLAGE" in Ireland, you see this is where it gets tricky with land titles, Johnnie Fox's lays in "Glencullen" whish is a township and not a village as we have no post office, to be classified as a village we must have a library and post office, therefore we are a township and do in fact come under the postal district of Dublin 18 according to a telephone conversation I had with An Post.
The claim Roundwood has is absolutely official in being the "Highest Village in Ireland", but the height of the pub is less than ours by some feet.

1] Johnnie Fox's - the loudest claim of all, we claim it, we argue it, we prove it time and time again, we even had to point out an old guide stone hidden behind foliage on the way up to the pub showing the height at that juncture to one Irish newspaper reporter doing an "expose" on the four venues.

Saruman, my opinion is that so long as no venue is slandering or hurting another venue then all is fair, especially when the people making the claims can communicate with each other and have a banter and we do all agree that it is mutually beneficial for all our businesses to continue making the claim, and as the marketing person for the "Highest Pub in Ireland" I would like to say that I welcome other venues that raise the claim as all advertising is good advertising we are told, and in this case it is. So long as we at Fox's continue to advertise abroad (as only we have the strength to do it from the four venues) and we continue to draw 300,000 visitors plus per year to our establishment alone as well as bringing tourism in for other local businesses then I think and believe that we will continue to "claim" the height factor with the support of Dublin Tourism, Bord Failte, Aer Lingus (who claimed in one newspaper to wave to us when they fly overhead!) and many happy customers.

Thank you again Saruman for the opportunity to respond, I hope it furthers discussions on board.ie


Kindest regards



Fred Rainert
Business & Marketing Manager
Johnnie Fox's Pub
Glencullen
Dublin Mountains
Ireland
T: +3531 2955647
F: +3531 2958911
E: fred@jfp.ie
W: www.jfp.ie

4 people have thanked this post
smoke.me.a.kipper ill be back for breakfast
#18

good detective work there Saruman!

Sleepy Registered User
#19

So basically, the answer is that the highest Bar in Ireland is the one in Kerry? But Johnny Foxes claim it because they have better opening hours?

djlinehan Registered User
#20

Meelin Village in North Cork stands at 251 metres (about 820 feet) above sea level, which is quite a bit higher than Roundwood.

Roundwood, in the Wicklow mountains. It is about 238 metres above sea level, or about 780 feet.....


Meelin has 2 pubs, tho not as popular as jf but have a licience which is the definition of a pub.....

but nice people at jf say what you will it really dosent really matter....

sorry all........

petes Registered User
#21

Sweet Zombie Jesus.

smellslikeshoes Registered User
#22

djlinehan said:
Meelin Village in North Cork stands at 251 metres (about 820 feet) above sea level, which is quite a bit higher than Roundwood.

Roundwood, in the Wicklow mountains. It is about 238 metres above sea level, or about 780 feet.....


Meelin has 2 pubs, tho not as popular as jf but have a licience which is the definition of a pub.....

but nice people at jf say what you will it really dosent really matter....

sorry all........



I don't think a 6 year old thread really needed to be dragged up for that

minidazzler Registered User
#23

Lads, there is only one way to sort this once and for all.

Get an altimeter, and have a beers at each of the pubs. That will sort it for certain.

Dravokivich Registered User
#24

djlinehan said:

sorry all........


for the necro bump?

General Zod Registered User
#25

Actually, Jack Nealon's on Capel St. held the title for a wee while over the weekend.

2 people have thanked this post
gianparz Registered User
#26

djlinehan said:
Meelin Village in North Cork stands at 251 metres (about 820 feet) above sea level, which is quite a bit higher than Roundwood.

Roundwood, in the Wicklow mountains. It is about 238 metres above sea level, or about 780 feet.....


Meelin has 2 pubs, tho not as popular as jf but have a licience which is the definition of a pub.....

but nice people at jf say what you will it really dosent really matter....

sorry all........



Well, according to Bing 3d map Roundwood is 750 feet above sea level, Meelin is at 830 feet, while Johnny Fox Pub is at 920 feet above sea level.

Looks like Johnny Fox is really the highest pub in Ireland after all.

Smartypantsdig Registered User
#27

there's even some boozer in Cavan, Bailieborough I think, claiming the title

jimmycrackcorm Registered User
#28

Sleepy said:
So basically, the answer is that the highest Bar in Ireland is the one in Kerry? But Johnny Foxes claim it because they have better opening hours?


Add to that Foxes insult to all Northern Irish nationalists that Derry doesn't count.

lucylu Registered User
#29

Top of Coom Pub in Kerry is 1045ft above sea level

gianparz Registered User
#30

Sleepy said:
So basically, the answer is that the highest Bar in Ireland is the one in Kerry? But Johnny Foxes claim it because they have better opening hours?



Exactly

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