BaZmO* Registered User
#1

Can anybody tell me what this means?

Cheers,

B.

Dun Registered User
#2

Is that the actual spelling? Is it supposed to be "veni, vidi, vici" (Latin - I came, I saw, I conquered - a Julius Caesar quote I believe)? Or maybe it's a pun on it.

BaZmO* Registered User
#3

Originally posted by Dun
Is that the actual spelling? Is it supposed to be "veni, vidi, vici" (Latin - I came, I saw, I conquered - a Julius Caesar quote I believe)? Or maybe it's a pun on it.


I wouldn't think that the spelling was right. Your explanation seems about right though, considering the context that it was said in.

Cheers!

Dun Registered User
#4

Well if it makes it any clearer, the vici part is pronounced "vee-chee"

#5

It could be a pun (I've seen similar ones used in adverts on the Metro in Rome). Given this vechi is at best a misspelling of vecchi (old) - and TBH, that’s a pun that does not make a lot of sense. I would guess that vici was the correct word as has been suggested.

sceptre Registered User
#6

Dun
Well if it makes it any clearer, the vici part is pronounced "vee-chee"

Only if you learned Church Latin.

#7

sceptre
Only if you learned Church Latin.


I was told you pronounce c with a hard sound in latin - like cecinit (composed) would be pronounced kek-in-it.

But apparently priests used to pronounce Latin like Italian and in fairness, it sounds better that way.

Maybe we need a Latin forum!

Dun Registered User
#8

sceptre
Only if you learned Church Latin.

Or use the common place pronunciation in English (like et cetera., vice versa, ad hoc, etc. (no pun intended).

Etrurian Registered User
#9

Dun
Is that the actual spelling? Is it supposed to be "veni, vidi, vici" (Latin - I came, I saw, I conquered - a Julius Caesar quote I believe)? Or maybe it's a pun on it.


That's the right solution
"Veni, vidi, vici" is the correct phrase, and was said by Julio Ceasar in the Roman Senatus when I came back from a difficult war that was dominated by Roman Forces. The meaning is "I came, I saw, I won (or conquered, it's the same) and the pronunciation for you should be:
"Veanee, vee-dee, vee-chee"

or, more correctly as Latin had only strong C
"Veanee, vee-dee, vee-kee"

Sorry for my english

OfflerCrocGod Registered User
#10

Etrurian
when I came back from a difficult war that was dominated by Roman Forces.
Damn your old I thought he said it upon walking out of his tent somewhere in North Africa?

Etrurian Registered User
#11

LOL I'm not so old
I don't know why I used "I" instead of "he".. I'm getting crazy

#12

Etrurian
I don't know why I used "I" instead of "he".. I'm getting crazy

And even he didn't use "I".

Etrurian Registered User
#13

The english "I" was "Ego" in latin (and also in ancient greek) but it wasn't used. In actual Italian "I" is "io" but it isn't used too much.

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