Imposter Registered User
#1

What is the plural of axis?

Dictionary.com reckons it's axes. But then trying for a definition of axes doesn't mention an 'axis'. Instead it talks of the plural of 'axe'. Axi would sound reasonable but doesn't seem to be a word! Any ideas?

aodh_rua Registered User
#2

Definitely 'axes'

ecksor Puppy Shotgun
#3

Any reference to more than one axis in mathematics uses the plural 'axes'.

dod Registered User
#4

Axes. Indubitably.

Imposter Registered User
#5

thanks. You guys were awful slow at replying!

Praetorian Registered User
#6

Axes for sure. I hate maths.

ecksor Puppy Shotgun
#7

That's seems orthogonal!

Talliesin Banned
#8

Originally posted by Imposter
Dictionary.com reckons it's axes. But then trying for a definition of axes doesn't mention an 'axis'. Instead it talks of the plural of 'axe'.

Not true. It gives the definition of axes; the plural of axis, as well, although you have to scroll for a bit.

Some dictionaries list axes as the plural of axis but don't list it as the plural of axe/ax. This makes sense in the printed version, where axe would be near to where one would find axes and hence the reader could be expected to find it, but makes less sense in the online versions where the same concept of "near" doesn't apply.

Imposter Registered User
#9

Originally posted by Talliesin
Not true. It gives the definition of axes; the plural of axis, as well, although you have to scroll for a bit.

Some dictionaries list axes as the plural of axis but don't list it as the plural of axe/ax. This makes sense in the printed version, where axe would be near to where one would find axes and hence the reader could be expected to find it, but makes less sense in the online versions where the same concept of "near" doesn't apply.


so it does, my bad/impatience!

ifyouwerehere Registered User
#10

The dictionary states the plural of axe, not axis. I have researched and it is definitely not axes, but plain axis. (base word: axis. plural: axis.)
It says this in books, dictionaries, and some dictionary sites on the Internet.

Hope this is a better reply.

cleremy jarkson Registered User
#11

Too late ifyouwherehere..the other posters in this thread are long dead at this stage.

pickarooney Moderator
#12

The language has changed hugely since 2003.

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