Boards.ie uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Click here to find out more x
Post Reply  
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
29-05-2012, 13:43   #1
Onesimus
Registered User
 
Onesimus's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Philemon:1:10-16
Posts: 2,040
What is the Anglican Liturgy like?

I've never been to an Anglican Liturgy before. What's it like? I assume there are many different types of anglican Churches so I guess I'll go ahead and ask you what the more traditional anglican liturgy is like?
Onesimus is offline  
Advertisement
29-05-2012, 14:01   #2
Benny_Cake
Moderator
 
Benny_Cake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Co.Kildare
Posts: 3,666
As I understand it, high Anglican parishes ("bells and smells" liturgy) are few and far between in the Church of Ireland. St.Bartholemew's in Ballsbridge, Dublin is one, apparently it has an excellent choir. Might be worth checking it out if you're interested. It's a good bit more common in the Church of England.
Benny_Cake is offline  
(2) thanks from:
29-05-2012, 14:02   #3
martinedwards
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Jordanstown Co Antrim
Posts: 1,346
not every service has Holy Communion.

morning and evening prayer are stand alone services. there are also a bunch of less often used service styles that can be wheeled out at the priest's discression.

I THINK that the rules say thet there should be a prayer book service in the parish church before noon on a Sunday, so that means that so long as ONE service (and that could technically be the priest in his vestry on his own) is read from the book, then any other services can be free form or to another structure.

there was a new version of the Book of Common prayer recently so there is now a choice of 16th century style language or (relatively) modern

here it is online.

http://www.bcponline.org/

as you rightly say, observance is varied depending on the church.

some folks like the trad style with a load of thees and thous, others use it like a ring binder and drop in & out as it suits them.

we're special. we're united Methodist and Church of Ireland, so we don't use it for non communion services, but we do for the Holy Communion. we also use it for the baptism section if there is a baptism.
martinedwards is offline  
(2) thanks from:
29-05-2012, 14:25   #4
martinedwards
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Jordanstown Co Antrim
Posts: 1,346
St George's in High Street in Belfast is Fairly High.

the correct term is actually Anglocatholic.

because of the political connections over the years, it's a term that isn't used much in the north........

In England there were a bunch of Anglicans who switched to Catholicism when they Church of England passed the ordination of women.

As far as I remember, a bunch of clergy switched too making the interesting group of married RC priests.......
martinedwards is offline  
Thanks from:
29-05-2012, 14:46   #5
HamletOrHecuba
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 670
It varies- the services of Traditional Anglican Communion are extremely close to the old Sarum Rite and celebrated beautifully and piously. Anglicans in Ireland and Northern Ireland appear outside of the crowd in St Georges in Belfast come across as almost Presbyterian.
HamletOrHecuba is offline  
Thanks from:
Advertisement
29-05-2012, 17:00   #6
homer911
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: South Co. Dublin
Posts: 3,233
As a "once anglican", now Presbyterian, I would consider it pretty rigid, although I now think I had a limited exposure to Anglicanism, and the truth is that it varies quite a lot. I much prefer the more informal Presbyterian Service and I have a strong dislike for parrot-fashion prayers. The only thing that approaches what Catholics would call liturgy in the Presybterian Church is the acts of baptism and communion
homer911 is offline  
29-05-2012, 22:43   #7
Brer Fox
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 244
I think some of their services are very reverent. I was at one once some years ago with an English friend. I hesitate to repeat it now though.
Brer Fox is offline  
Thanks from:
29-05-2012, 23:55   #8
Onesimus
Registered User
 
Onesimus's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Philemon:1:10-16
Posts: 2,040
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brer Fox View Post
I think some of their services are very reverent. I was at one once some years ago with an English friend. I hesitate to repeat it now though.
What do you mean you hesitate to repeat it? repeat what?
Onesimus is offline  
30-05-2012, 23:25   #9
Brer Fox
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 244
It might create confusion to other Catholics and also to the non-Catholics. I guess there is the risk of it promoting religious indifference.
Brer Fox is offline  
Advertisement
31-05-2012, 00:47   #10
LordSutch
Registered User
 
LordSutch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Ireland (mostly).
Posts: 7,895
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benny_Cake View Post
As I understand it, high Anglican parishes ("bells and smells" liturgy) are few and far between in the Church of Ireland. St.Bartholemew's in Ballsbridge, Dublin is one, apparently it has an excellent choir. Might be worth checking it out if you're interested. It's a good bit more common in the Church of England.
Well said, correct on all counts! St Bart's does indeed have a great choir, and just to add that 'St Johns' Sandymount is another 'High Church' with all the "bells and smells" as you put it. Never heard that expression before, very good ) Re Communion; well most Anglican Churches have Communion on a Sunday once a month, ours (not High Church) is on the 1st Sunday of the month, but I guess it varies from parish to parish.
LordSutch is offline  
31-05-2012, 10:30   #11
Benny_Cake
Moderator
 
Benny_Cake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Co.Kildare
Posts: 3,666
Quote:
Originally Posted by LordSutch View Post
Well said, correct on all counts! St Bart's does indeed have a great choir, and just to add that 'St Johns' Sandymount is another 'High Church' with all the "bells and smells" as you put it. Never heard that expression before, very good ) Re Communion; well most Anglican Churches have Communion on a Sunday once a month, ours (not High Church) is on the 1st Sunday of the month, but I guess it varies from parish to parish.
I can't claim credit for "bells and smells", came across it somewhere online before! I hadn't heard of St.Johns, from looking at their website they sing the entire Mass every Sunday, very traditional. An uncle of mine once inadvertently attended an Easter ceremony at a very High Church of England parish in London. It wasn't until after the service that he realised it wasn't a Roman Catholic church, he said his only suspicion was that "it seemed a bit too Catholic"!
Benny_Cake is offline  
(2) thanks from:
Post Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Remove Text Formatting
Bold
Italic
Underline

Insert Image
Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text
 
Decrease Size
Increase Size
Please sign up or log in to join the discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Share Tweet