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20-02-2012, 20:14   #1
jayteecork
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32 years old, thinking of doing the Dip

Hi all,
I have a degree in Mathematical Studies and Philosophy from UCC as well as a post grad diploma in Accounting and Finance.

I originally set out to do the degree with a notion to go on and teach but over the years I decided against.

Now I'm 32, unemployed. and can't really see many other options open to me.

I hear there's always a need for Maths teachers, particularly ones that actually studied it in college.

What I'm wondering is whether or not I'd be considered too old to be doing a teaching dip.

Aren't most people on it only around 21-22 and fresh out of college?

Also, is it true that jobs teaching Maths are widely available?

I'd appreciate any input, many thanks.

Last edited by jayteecork; 20-02-2012 at 20:20.
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20-02-2012, 20:19   #2
TheBody
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I'm doing the part time dip in DCU. I'm 30 years old. I'm about the average age on the course. Plenty of people older than me on the course too. Don't let that deter you.

Having said that there are bugger all jobs out there in any subject.
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20-02-2012, 21:38   #3
Fuinseog
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Originally Posted by jayteecork View Post
Hi all,
I have a degree in Mathematical Studies and Philosophy from UCC as well as a post grad diploma in Accounting and Finance.

I originally set out to do the degree with a notion to go on and teach but over the years I decided against.

Now I'm 32, unemployed. and can't really see many other options open to me.

I hear there's always a need for Maths teachers, particularly ones that actually studied it in college.

What I'm wondering is whether or not I'd be considered too old to be doing a teaching dip.

Aren't most people on it only around 21-22 and fresh out of college?

Also, is it true that jobs teaching Maths are widely available?

I'd appreciate any input, many thanks.
not wishing to sound negative, but what makes you think you will land a job as a teacher? just because you do the dip does not mean you walk into a job. schools are getting rid of teachers.
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20-02-2012, 21:43   #4
byhookorbycrook
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Like anyone thinking of teaching, I suggest you do some observation in a school, will sort whether it's for you or not.
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20-02-2012, 22:35   #5
dory
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I hear there's always a need for Maths teachers, particularly ones that actually studied it in college.
Pretty sure all the maths teachers we have studied it in college. You should look at jobs notices and see how many jobs there are for maths. Compare that we the numbers of unemployed teachers....

But as had been said you're not old. Many people in their 30's and older are in my Dip class.
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20-02-2012, 23:52   #6
jayteecork
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Pretty sure all the maths teachers we have studied it in college. You should look at jobs notices and see how many jobs there are for maths. Compare that we the numbers of unemployed teachers....

But as had been said you're not old. Many people in their 30's and older are in my Dip class.
I read somewhere that up to 50% of secondary maths teaching have no maths qualification.

Thanks for replies anyway, appreciate it.
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20-02-2012, 23:52   #7
jayteecork
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Like anyone thinking of teaching, I suggest you do some observation in a school, will sort whether it's for you or not.
Thanks, how might one go about that?
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21-02-2012, 08:43   #8
TheBody
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Thanks, how might one go about that?
Simply call up a school and ask them if you could observe for a few hours. Perhaps you have contacts the school you went to?
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21-02-2012, 09:12   #9
Fuinseog
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Simply call up a school and ask them if you could observe for a few hours. Perhaps you have contacts the school you went to?
better still. observe at different schools. go to a 'good' school and a 'bad' school. of you are on full hours you will be kept busy from 8 until 5 most days. its not 22 hours a week as people think.
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21-02-2012, 09:19   #10
GrauballeMan
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Agree with Fuinseog.

The Dip is a great qualification to have, but I wouldn't bother unless you have some interest in actually teaching. It's a terrific and rewarding job if you enjoy it, and a nightmare for everyone if you don't. Observe, get involved in a homework club and see if you think it's for you. If your heart is elsewhere, then teaching is not for you, or the students you'll have responsibility for.
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21-02-2012, 10:41   #11
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I read somewhere that up to 50% of secondary maths teaching have no maths qualification.
Many papers seem to be a bit anti-teachers these days. Don't believe everything you read. Best of luck whatever you decide.
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21-02-2012, 16:04   #12
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At 30, you're certainly not too old. If you're doing it because you think you'll waltz into a job just because you have a degree in maths you might as well forget it though. It's probably true that more than 50% of maths teachers don't have a degree in maths but most of us still have more than enough university level maths to teach it, even if the teaching council won't acknowledge it.

There are very few jobs out there. You might get one if you're lucky but don't think for a second that a degree in maths is a free pass. If your Irish is decent, it increases your chances but not by a lot.
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22-02-2012, 10:34   #13
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Hey, from what I see on educationposts.ie the most jobs advertised are maths. I'm in a similar position to urself, 31 unemployed with science degree and masters and have applied for Hdip. People seem to really negative about the prospects of getting a job but from what I can see and I have been looking for a job for the last 2 years ( although I was doing a masters and really just trying to get a lay of the land for job prospects for the 1st year) is that their is more jobs advertised for sub work/part time work than the area which I am qualified in (which is environmental).

I'm not trying to suggest that you'll walk into a job or anything but I often feel that people here seem to think that teaching has been more affected than everywhere else. From the perspective of the regularity of jobs being advertised I just don't think that is the case. Obviosuly I dont have the full picture as I am not working as a teacher but I have spent quite a bit of time researching and watching what positions are becoming available. However, I'd imagine competition for these positions is intense.

I also feel that their will always be a need for teachers and if it is something you are passionate about you will get a job in the future in Ireland. The UK are also short on teachers especially science and math so I think the Hdip is something which is a good option for my situation in that I am facing leaving Ireland. at least as a teacher I can get experience and come back while in the environmental sector this may not be the case.

I suppose what people are trying to say is that while the conditions of being a teacher might appear good on the face of it, alot of work and patience is required and you need to be prepared to accept alot of crap from students and probably parents.
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22-02-2012, 10:55   #14
cagefan
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Hey, from what I see on educationposts.ie the most jobs advertised are maths. I'm in a similar position to urself, 31 unemployed with science degree and masters and have applied for Hdip. People seem to really negative about the prospects of getting a job but from what I can see and I have been looking for a job for the last 2 years ( although I was doing a masters and really just trying to get a lay of the land for job prospects for the 1st year) is that their is more jobs advertised for sub work/part time work than the area which I am qualified in (which is environmental).

I'm not trying to suggest that you'll walk into a job or anything but I often feel that people here seem to think that teaching has been more affected than everywhere else. From the perspective of the regularity of jobs being advertised I just don't think that is the case. Obviosuly I dont have the full picture as I am not working as a teacher but I have spent quite a bit of time researching and watching what positions are becoming available. However, I'd imagine competition for these positions is intense.

I also feel that their will always be a need for teachers and if it is something you are passionate about you will get a job in the future in Ireland. The UK are also short on teachers especially science and math so I think the Hdip is something which is a good option for my situation in that I am facing leaving Ireland. at least as a teacher I can get experience and come back while in the environmental sector this may not be the case.

I suppose what people are trying to say is that while the conditions of being a teacher might appear good on the face of it, alot of work and patience is required and you need to be prepared to accept alot of crap from students and probably parents.
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22-02-2012, 17:28   #15
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Hey, from what I see on educationposts.ie the most jobs advertised are maths. I'm in a similar position to urself, 31 unemployed with science degree and masters and have applied for Hdip. People seem to really negative about the prospects of getting a job but from what I can see and I have been looking for a job for the last 2 years ( although I was doing a masters and really just trying to get a lay of the land for job prospects for the 1st year) is that their is more jobs advertised for sub work/part time work than the area which I am qualified in (which is environmental).

I'm not trying to suggest that you'll walk into a job or anything but I often feel that people here seem to think that teaching has been more affected than everywhere else. From the perspective of the regularity of jobs being advertised I just don't think that is the case. Obviosuly I dont have the full picture as I am not working as a teacher but I have spent quite a bit of time researching and watching what positions are becoming available. However, I'd imagine competition for these positions is intense.

I also feel that their will always be a need for teachers and if it is something you are passionate about you will get a job in the future in Ireland. The UK are also short on teachers especially science and math so I think the Hdip is something which is a good option for my situation in that I am facing leaving Ireland. at least as a teacher I can get experience and come back while in the environmental sector this may not be the case.

I suppose what people are trying to say is that while the conditions of being a teacher might appear good on the face of it, alot of work and patience is required and you need to be prepared to accept alot of crap from students and probably parents.

Just to point out I'm a maths/music teacher qualified and I would be negative about the job prospects. If you are looking at education posts after nov of any year all of those posts are short term contracts (except maternity leave which can be longer) anything from covering someone out sick for a couple of weeks up as far as one lasting until June 1st. This means you could be moving schools constantly and be interviewing several times a year to get posts.

Unless you are employed on RPT before nov 1st with very few exceptions you will not get paid for the summer or your holidays e.g. Easter meaning a lot of saving to cover yourself. You can sign on but anecdotally the dole office are v rude about it lately and personal experience is that with delays I didn't get it until oct when I was back at work. Not saying it wasn't handy to get it though even at that stage.

Not many non permanent teachers get full time hours but would be expected to be in school full time and participate with/run after school activities to try and keep their post the following year. Jobs are increasingly being split into smaller and smaller contracts. So where previously one teacher would be hired on 22hrs, 3 teachers are hired on hours that add to the 22. While this means theremoreT''more jobs, they are by no means full time.There are quite a few teachers in my shool on less than 10 hours and one on 6. Their only hope is to hang around each day and pray that they get classes to cover to make up the deficit in salary. I'm on 2/3rds hours and that's considered great.

You need at least 4 years in one school on your own hours to qualify for a CID and this is pretty much the only way to get the holy grail of jobs-permanency. However this is increasingly difficult with job cuts across the sector. You could be three years on contracts and suddenly with budget cuts your out on your ear and have to start all over again on year 1 in another school. The ASTI said the average waiting time for a permanent position in second level was7 years during the boom, it's much more now I would reckon.

Having said all that OP if you really want to teach you definitely need to take the advice given and go and offer to shadow in several schools before forking out over 6k for the dip. Go into teaching with your eyes open to both job prospects and the nature of the job and who knows you may love it. I know I do. Just take the advice and do the research in schools first.
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