Thinking of Engineering, is the maths impossibly difficult? - Page 2 - boards.ie
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16-07-2012, 09:43   #16
djpbarry
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engineering maths is not a huge lot tougher than any other subject...
I wouldn’t agree with that at all. I work with a bunch of biochemists and molecular biologists and they are almost completely mathematically illiterate. You can get through a BSc and completely avoid any kind of maths. This is precisely why one sees this kind of paper appearing in biology journals:

http://jcb.rupress.org/content/177/1/7.short

But anyway, OP, I think you’ll be fine if you’re prepared to put the work in.
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16-07-2012, 10:06   #17
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I wouldn’t agree with that at all. I work with a bunch of biochemists and molecular biologists and they are almost completely mathematically illiterate. You can get through a BSc and completely avoid any kind of maths. This is precisely why one sees this kind of paper appearing in biology journals:

http://jcb.rupress.org/content/177/1/7.short

But anyway, OP, I think you’ll be fine if you’re prepared to put the work in.
Would agree here. What must be remembered for the OP is the maths is not only challenging but its in 80%-90% modules for engineering. If you dont grasp maths well then could be difficult in all subjects. That being said I think with hard work its possible.
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17-07-2012, 02:55   #18
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Ya the lecturer in NUIG said that as I got an A2 in ordinary level and have taken a few maths classes already in my chemistry degree, I should be ok, as long as I put the work in. I just have to pass that entrance exam.... ugh.
Would you not be eligible for a postgrad? There are many places which allow science students to do a precursor 6 months and pending results to get into a masters degree. Have you checked into this?It may be a cheaper alternate...
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18-07-2012, 00:49   #19
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Would you not be eligible for a postgrad? There are many places which allow science students to do a precursor 6 months and pending results to get into a masters degree. Have you checked into this?It may be a cheaper alternate...
No haven't researched that option, I don't even know where to look.
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18-07-2012, 02:03   #20
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Try checking out the entry requirements to some schools and emailing the prog coordinator.
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18-07-2012, 16:49   #21
mawk
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I wouldn’t agree with that at all. I work with a bunch of biochemists and molecular biologists and they are almost completely mathematically illiterate. You can get through a BSc and completely avoid any kind of maths. This is precisely why one sees this kind of paper appearing in biology journals:

http://jcb.rupress.org/content/177/1/7.short

But anyway, OP, I think you’ll be fine if you’re prepared to put the work in.

well I meant its no more difficult than other engineering subjects.. fluids, mechanics, electrotech, control etc
I agree its certainly more difficult than many other subjects in absolute terms.
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18-07-2012, 16:58   #22
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There are plenty of conversion Masters degrees in the UK.
I'd imagine you would be eligible for plenty of these.
Chemical or Energy Engineering would have better prospects than Civil at the moment.
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22-07-2012, 02:39   #23
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Nothing is impossibly difficult if you're dedicated, coming from someone who got a D2 in Ordinary Level in the LC when he didn't give a toss and is now heading into his final year in Energy & Environmental Engineering. He also enjoys referring to himself in third person.


Nothing worth having comes easy!
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30-07-2012, 10:46   #24
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Also, I always wanted to do civil but the jobs for that are few and far between, is it a bad idea to do it? would ye recommend I do undenominated to see if I like any other branch of engineering?
This is dependant on the university or IT you intend to do your course in. I know civils from UL have struck lucky due to lecturer intervention in different firms around Ireland and Canada. I can quote a graduate in Calgary actually being asked if there were any other UL engineering grads looking for jobs to drop in!

I'm not entirely sure NUIG is the place to be for a civil eng. If you're going into a course with such competitive job seekers, surely a more reputable engineering college would be the better option? UCD, UL and Bolton Street DIT are the top rated in Ireland for engineering. NUIG are more humanities and science based. Also, with UCD and UL you have a chance of doing work experience during the 4 years so you have an advantage over the other colleges when it comes to looking for a graduate job.

Just something to think about
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30-07-2012, 11:19   #25
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If you're going into a course with such competitive job seekers, surely a more reputable engineering college would be the better option? UCD, UL and Bolton Street DIT are the top rated in Ireland for engineering. NUIG are more humanities and science based.
In terms of reputation, there’s little to choose between any of the above. But anyway, a far more important consideration is course content.
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09-08-2012, 09:44   #26
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+1 on doing a postgrad. There's loads of conversion courses in the UK, much better options than doing a 4 year course. You can pick any area you want to specialise in and once you have a decent undergrad and write a good personal statement you should get in.

I really don't recommend doing civil, so many out of work EXPERIENCED civils out there. Even things pick up, with the massive over supply there'll be no money for years. Also, most graduate civils I know in Ireland/UK are being exploited. Working silly hours for crap pay. Not the nicest industry to be in at the moment and I don't see it changing for a long time. Other engineering disciplines are worth pursuing, just not civil.
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09-08-2012, 10:01   #27
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+1 on doing a postgrad. There's loads of conversion courses in the UK, much better options than doing a 4 year course. You can pick any area you want to specialise in and once you have a decent undergrad and write a good personal statement you should get in.

I really don't recommend doing civil, so many out of work EXPERIENCED civils out there. Even things pick up, with the massive over supply there'll be no money for years. Also, most graduate civils I know in Ireland/UK are being exploited. Working silly hours for crap pay. Not the nicest industry to be in at the moment and I don't see it changing for a long time. Other engineering disciplines are worth pursuing, just not civil.
Yeah massive oversupply in fairness. A lot of jobs going in the manufacturing industry especially the high tech end. I have been looking at jobs the last few months and everyone I interviewed with have been in one particular high tech industry which is booming. Seems to be ok in most high tech manufacturing industries.
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11-08-2012, 18:40   #28
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Nope, D3 honours in LC. Got in through the special maths exam. Failed the first semester of maths (through stupidity I might add, not mathematical ability). Second semester was fine (had it done in slightly over an hour and we were given an two and a half hours!) and I'm aiming as high as possible from now on in maths.
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21-08-2012, 21:00   #29
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Would agree here. What must be remembered for the OP is the maths is not only challenging but its in 80%-90% modules for engineering. If you dont grasp maths well then could be difficult in all subjects. That being said I think with hard work its possible.
Well from my science degree, where the math is applied to actual problems, I love doing and I'm fairly good at it. The only reason I didn't do HL maths in the LC was because it was taking up sooo much time and I wanted to boost my points through other subjects like most other students at the time.
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