Hibernia Teaching course - Page 2 - boards.ie
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21-02-2012, 01:45   #16
Mr.BA
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I work in Education and Hibernia graduates are not regarded that well. The first few years had top quality people on the courses but the last few years are not as well regarded. This is a sweeping generalisation I know but that is the vibe out there. I am sure there are some top quality people on the course.

If you want to become a teacher, go to a recognised college full time. You will learn as much from your classmates as you will in lectures.

H.Dips are to become 2 year long programmes now rather than the 1 year add on of a few years ago.

I completely agree with you on this! Not worth spending all the money on doing a PDE online! Also just to the previous speaker, that wasn't a very good reason to support Hibernia!
The reason why I'm also against it is because people who literally scrape a 2:2 in their degrees get into that course! I know someone who got 2.48 GPA from UCD and ended up getting into it! Those people clearly don't know their field so how could they possibly be fit to teach?

It's a complete joke! They should do away with the course if you ask me! So unemployable compared to other proper PDE courses!
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21-02-2012, 18:42   #17
spurious
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The reason why I'm also against it is because people who literally scrape a 2:2 in their degrees get into that course! I know someone who got 2.48 GPA from UCD and ended up getting into it! Those people clearly don't know their field so how could they possibly be fit to teach?

Do you have any evidence whatsoever that being very good at studying something makes you very good at teaching it?
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22-02-2012, 15:34   #18
chippers
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Do you have any evidence whatsoever that being very good at studying something makes you very good at teaching it?
There was a video uploaded on a thread a while back about the Finnish education system. It was a very good watch - have a look.

http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showt...php?p=75775332

The video did not imply that being very good at studying a subject made a very good teacher but I dont think is the point the OP is trying to make. However, it did provide evidence of only top graduates being accepted into the professional education courses in Finland. And that their excellent in-depth knowledge of their subject was very important to the success of the Finnish education system.
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24-02-2012, 21:43   #19
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This is the first year of the Hibernia post-primary course, and as a student on the course, I can safely say that the course is well-run and the content and material covered is very thorough. It also opens up the possibility of returning to education and qualifying as a teacher to many people who, for various reasons, cannot attend college on a full-time basis. Lots of the students on the course have financial commitments and/or young children, preventing them from attending a 'proper university' and this course offers a really flexible way of studying. In this regard it is very progressive. There will always be plenty of people who are happy to offer negative advice based on very little knowledge, but my advice would be to try and ignore unfounded comments and research the course thoroughly yourself. The qualification is fully recognised by the teaching council and I would suggest that their approval is more important than that of posters on an anonymous forum. HTH

Last edited by SlinkyL; 24-02-2012 at 22:21.
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25-02-2012, 18:37   #20
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It also opens up the possibility of returning to education and qualifying as a teacher to many people who, for various reasons, cannot attend college on a full-time basis. Lots of the students on the course have financial commitments and/or young children, preventing them from attending a 'proper university' and this course offers a really flexible way of studying. In this regard it is very progressive.
I can't comment one way or the other on this course, or indeed or on Hibernia in general, as I don't know anybody who has studied with them. I will agree though, that there is definitely a negative attitude towards the course from many principals - whether that is justified or not.

I would however caution those embarking on the course that they are going to find it very tough once qualified - just like graduates of other teacher training courses.

Starting out in teaching now, more often than not, invoves being available at the drop of a hat, being extremely flexible and for many it involves sitting around all day in school waiting for a class or for some subbing to arise. Of course there will be little pay for these short and sporadic hours - but to get those few hours you will have to give up a lot more of your time. This will also cause problems with signing on for social welfare due to the spread out nature of teaching hours.

People who are unable to be flexible with their time or their financial commitments, for whatever reason, will find it particularly difficult - especially since they will be competing against people without those same constraints.
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24-05-2012, 13:14   #21
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Originally Posted by Mr.BA View Post
I completely agree with you on this! Not worth spending all the money on doing a PDE online! Also just to the previous speaker, that wasn't a very good reason to support Hibernia!
The reason why I'm also against it is because people who literally scrape a 2:2 in their degrees get into that course! I know someone who got 2.48 GPA from UCD and ended up getting into it! Those people clearly don't know their field so how could they possibly be fit to teach?

It's a complete joke! They should do away with the course if you ask me! So unemployable compared to other proper PDE courses!



What the hell are you talking about. Seriously think before you write something like that down
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24-05-2012, 13:17   #22
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Hey

I got a 2:2 in my degree. Are you saying I shouldnt become a teacher???
If your going to have that negative attitude towards people, you defintely aint fit for teaching yourself..
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24-05-2012, 13:38   #23
Mr.BA
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Hey

I got a 2:2 in my degree. Are you saying I shouldnt become a teacher???
If your going to have that negative attitude towards people, you defintely aint fit for teaching yourself..
Just to let you know that I know many people who got 2:2's and became teachers and a great at it. If you read what I said again you'd see that I said people who barely get 2:2's get into the hdip there and it's a joke as they don't know their field well enough! Like someone I know got 2.48 GPA from UCD! That person got her 2:2 cos she got someone to do their assignment and take home exam where she got the a+. She was on a pass. Colleges like the NUI and trinity want students with higher grades as they better know their fields!
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18-06-2013, 16:25   #24
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<snipped unsubstantiated allegations>

Mod note: Please do not sign up to boards to use every single post to bad mouth a company, thanks.

Last edited by spurious; 18-06-2013 at 19:51. Reason: unsubstantiated allegations
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19-06-2013, 10:44   #25
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As far as I am concerned once the person is qualified and registered with the teaching council it shouldnt matter whether the qualification is from Hibernia or elsewhere. In fact as a supervising teacher/mentor of many H.Dips/PGCEs over the years the best candidate I have ever encountered (which includes 2 with doctorates) was from Hibernia...its the person that you should judge on their ability not what college they attended !!!
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