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02-05-2011, 16:59   #1
CDfm
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Nuts in May or Ball Care for a Beginer & the Rules of the Game

Whenever I read Mens Discussions a major whinge is well we never hear about mens stuff in health whereas when it comes to breast cancer awareness you get lots of discussion.

Not so for Nuts - they just don't get enough attention. As for the prostate gland - a little nucleur power like device - it never gets a look in. The penis - natures love missile gets a look in but not much.



So on a recent thread I said -that campaigns are fcekin boring and how can a guy grow up not knowing about his testicles & prostate etc when they are natures #1 on the scale of pleasure giving for men.

This is not a health thread but more a getting the resourses and links together on the Crown Jewels.

So I want to find out about my nuts and all things nut related in that general area - because I do not know.

I know lots of other guys dont either & I want to find out. I know more about getting my car fixed or updating my PC.

So if anyone has any ideas where the info is hidden or has questions too or knows of links or can explain it all please get on board.
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02-05-2011, 20:36   #2
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I like pictures and I suppose like me it is a surprise to most guys that " a pain in me b******s " is not really precise as it is more complicated then that.

See here for information: http://www.innerbody.com/image/repmov.html


I didn't know until last year what prostate cancer was and only learned how to check my testicles recently.

I have never had a sti ( sexiually transmitted infection) & would not know how to recognise one.

Late last year a friend of ours aged 43 died of testicular cancer. Another friends Dad had prostate cancer and it was not pleasant and his daughter said ignorance and embarresment killed him. My sons friend at 19 got mumps and he was quite ill -his testicles were swollen.

Now if I go to my GP's surgery I dont see leaflets so how can I treat my "nuts" healthily and how do I know if I have a problem and what to get checked and when.

Last edited by Darragh; 10-06-2011 at 09:16. Reason: copyright issues
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02-05-2011, 21:42   #3
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I think every guy should visit a nurse or doctor and learn how to check themselves. Reading the information is good but it is not the same. I had what turned out to a cyst, but up until that moment I had zero idea what to check for when doing the self-check.

Visiting the doctor really cleared things up. She was pretty clear about what to check for and what would cause alarm.
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02-05-2011, 22:33   #4
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From Cancer.ie How to self check your testicles

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Self-check of testicles

It can help to examine your testicles yourself every month. The best time to do this is after a warm bath or shower, when the skin of your scrotum is relaxed.

* Hold your scrotum in the palms of your hands.
* Use your fingers and thumb on both hands to examine your testicles.
* Gently feel each testicle, one at a time, for any change in size or weight.
* The testicle itself should be smooth with no lumps or swellings.
* It is normal to feel a soft tube at the top and back of the testicle.
* It is common for one testicle to be slightly larger or to hang lower than the other.


If you notice any swelling, lump, or experience a different sensation than normal, visit your GP as soon as possible. Call the National Cancer Helpline 1800 200 700 if you would like more information.
Most women check their breasts at least every month (imo) yet blokes don't do the same check on their testicles, and it can literally save their lives.

Know how they normally feel and you'll feel if they are different guys! I'd one bf who didn't and I found a lump (sure killed off that sexy time) and he went and got it checked and it was fine, nothing to worry about Still good to get these things checked out!
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02-05-2011, 22:41   #5
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Originally Posted by parker kent View Post
I think every guy should visit a nurse or doctor and learn how to check themselves. Reading the information is good but it is not the same. I had what turned out to a cyst, but up until that moment I had zero idea what to check for when doing the self-check.
.
Ain't that so, what to check, you were lucky to find it.

My GP is great and I don't feel stupid asking her questions.

Most guys wont take your advice though, so, do you know of any links or sites mentioning the dundamentals of what you learned.
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02-05-2011, 23:22   #6
parker kent
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This Q&A here is about the same situation I was in. I haven't had it removed yet, but I do have to have semi-regular checks.

http://ehealthforum.com/health/topic50716.html
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03-05-2011, 17:56   #7
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Just to catch up with the jargon, the Aussies have lots of terms for " a pain in the b******s "

Here is one I found covering everything from sports injuries to cancer.


Quote:
Summary

Injuries to the testicles should always be referred to a doctor. A number of non-cancerous conditions can affect the testicles, such as testicular torsion. The testicles are also prone to injury or trauma, such as ruptured blood vessels or tearing. Surgery is sometimes required. Fertility is not affected if you have one functioning testicle.


There are various non-cancerous conditions that can affect the testicles, such as testicular torsion. The testicles are also prone to injury because they are not protected by muscle or bone. It is important to seek prompt medical attention for any testicular complaint. Testicles are also known as testes (one is a testis) or ‘balls’.

Testicles explained
The testicles are two small, oval-shaped male sex glands that produce sex hormones and sperm. Each testicle is housed in a fibrous outer covering called the tunica albuginea. Sperm production needs a temperature that is around 2°C lower than the body, which is why the testicles are located outside the body in a sack of skin (scrotum).

Trauma to the testicles
Testicles are easily injured because they are not protected by muscle or bone. The type of injury could include ruptured blood vessels or tearing of the testicle.
Possible injuries include:
  • Penetrating (for example, stab wound)
  • Impact from a moving object (for example, a kick to the testicles)
  • Impact from hitting an immovable object (for example, a fall onto a hard surface).
Injuries to the testicles can be assessed by physical examination, ultrasound and MRI scan. If the testicles seem normal, the doctor may prescribe pain-killing medication. Any damage to the testicles must be surgically repaired. This is usually performed under general anaesthesia.

In severe cases of trauma, the testicle may be damaged beyond repair and must be removed. Fertility is not affected if one functioning testicle remains.

Testicular torsion
The testicle is attached to the body by the spermatic cord. Testicular torsion occurs when the spermatic cord twists and cuts off the blood supply to the testicle. This condition can occur at any age, but tends to be more common between the onset of puberty and the mid 20s. It requires urgent medical attention.

Hard physical activity can cause this twisting of the cord. In most cases, however, it is caused by abnormalities in a male’s anatomy (body structure and organs) that make it easier for the testicle to twist or rotate around the cord.

Symptoms of testicular torsion
Symptoms include:
  • Severe pain
  • Scrotal swelling
  • Nausea and vomiting.
  • These symptoms can often be confused with an infection of the testicles. An infection should not be diagnosed until torsion is ruled out.
Urgent medical attention is needed to save the testicle when torsion is diagnosed. Surgery must untwist the spermatic cord and restore blood flow to the testicle. Physical examination and ultrasound scans are used to make the diagnosis.

The survival rate of the affected testicle is poor unless surgery is performed within 24 hours. In many cases, the spermatic cord on the unaffected side is also secured during the same operation to prevent future torsion of the other testicle.

Torsion of the appendix testicle
The appendix testicle is a small structure located at the upper third of the testicle. Torsion of the appendix testicle means that the structure has twisted and cut off its blood supply.

This condition is easily confused with testicular torsion because the symptoms are so similar. However, the onset of pain is slower and the condition often presents with a noticeable blue dot on the surface of the scrotum. This blue dot is the darkened appendix testicle. Surgery is needed to correct the problem.

Other testicular conditions
Some other conditions that can affect the testicles include:
  • Epididymitis – the epididymis is a collection of small tubes located at the back of each testicle. They collect and store sperm. Epididymitis is infection and inflammation of these tubes. Causes include urinary tract infections and sexually transmissible infections (STIs). Treatment includes antibiotics.
  • Epididymo-orchitis – infection of the epididymis and testicle that causes inflammation and pain. Treatment includes antibiotics.
  • Varicocele or varicose veins – 10 to 15 per cent of men have a varicocele, where veins draw blood from the testicle. This blood has to rise against gravity when men stand up. Valves in the veins help this process. If the valves don’t work, blood pools in the veins. This swells the veins and gives the appearance of ‘varicose veins’. Varicoceles usually don’t require treatment, unless the varicocele is severe enough to cause discomfort or impair fertility. The links between varicocele and infertility are complex and research is ongoing. Treatment includes surgery or radiological techniques that can block the testicular veins.
  • Haematocele – a blood clot caused by trauma or injury to the testicles or scrotum. In some cases, the body is able to reabsorb the blood. If not, surgery is needed to remove the clot.
  • Hydrocele – abnormal build-up of fluid that causes the affected testicle to swell. In some cases, the body can reabsorb the fluid. Even though the condition is painless, the hydrocele may become so large that surgery is needed to remove it. In some cases, an untreated hydrocele can turn into an inguinal hernia.
  • Spermatocele – an abnormal build-up of sperm-filled fluid next to the epididymis that feels like a separate lump on the testicle. This is harmless, but can be removed surgically if it becomes large or bothersome.
  • Undescended testicles – either one or both testicles are missing from the scrotum and are lodged instead inside the lower abdomen. Premature and low weight newborn boys are most prone to undescended testicles. This condition is a known risk factor for testicular cancer and strongly related to infertility. Unless the testicle is brought down into the scrotum by 12 months of age, the risk of damage to sperm production in later life is high.
  • Testicular cancer – an abnormal growth or tumour that usually appears as a hard, and sometimes painful or tender, lump in either testicle. In most cases, testicular cancer is curable if medical treatment is sought early. Surgical removal of the affected testicle (orchidectomy) is usually the first treatment for all testicular cancer.
http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/b...s?opendocument
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03-05-2011, 19:32   #8
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Quote:
Varicocele or varicose veins – 10 to 15 per cent of men have a varicocele, where veins draw blood from the testicle. This blood has to rise against gravity when men stand up. Valves in the veins help this process. If the valves don’t work, blood pools in the veins. This swells the veins and gives the appearance of ‘varicose veins’. Varicoceles usually don’t require treatment, unless the varicocele is severe enough to cause discomfort or impair fertility. The links between varicocele and infertility are complex and research is ongoing. Treatment includes surgery or radiological techniques that can block the testicular veins.
I had this when I was younger around 17 years of age when I had it removed but I 1st discovered it at 15. I was scared sh∗∗less that it was cancer and never bothered to get it looked at until one day it had gotten so bad it was painful so I finally went to a doctor, he checked me told me what it was and said he'd set up an appointment with a Urologist. The waiting time to see a urologist was 3-5 months!!!!! I decided to tell my dad, he gave out to me (in a loving concerned way) for leaving it so long. Luckily he knew a doctor and I had an operation to remove it within 3 weeks.

I think it is pretty scary and ridiculous that the waiting time to see a urologist for men is over 3 months. It's no wonder men die of prostate cancer and testicular cancer the latter of which being pretty easy to cure once detected. I suppose the fact that men leave things to the last minute or ignore it also doesn't help.

A varicocele will feel like you have a bag of spaghetti in your ball sack, can get pretty uncomfortable at times.
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03-05-2011, 20:27   #9
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I find my doctor most helpful......it's all facts figures statistics these days as they reference 100's of medical articles on the internet....it's more like going to an accountant than a doctor....
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03-05-2011, 22:50   #10
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Any excuse.......


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04-05-2011, 00:34   #11
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Any excuse.......


Does she do a prostate video too
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04-05-2011, 20:44   #12
Cicero
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I like these kind of simple guides to checking your body- easy to remember- this ones' for evaluating moles on skin....
http://www.afraidtoask.com/skinCA/skinwarning.html

The "ABCD" rule and Melanoma Danger Signs
Finding melanoma early is the key to curing this vicious cancer. Learn the ABCD mnemonic for recognizing moles and growths that might be cancerous. Though most (if not all) of your "suspicious" moles will turn out to be normal non-cancerous moles, it is much better to be safe than to not see, or ignore, an early melanoma. Be sure to review how to do a monthly skin examination to properly look for abnormal growths.
If your mole or growth has one or more of the ABCDEs, you should show it to your physician as soon as possible!

Asymmetry
Asymmetry can be assessed by comparing one half of the growth to the other half to determine if the halves are equal in size. Unequal or asymmetric moles are suspicious.



Border
If the mole's border is irregular, notched, scalloped, or indistinct, it is more likely to be cancerous (or precancerous) and is thus suspicious.



Color
Variation of color (e.g., more than one color or shade) within a mole is a suspicious finding. Different shades of browns, blues, reds, whites, and blacks are all concerning.



Diameter
Any mole that has a diameter larger than a pencil's eraser in size (> 6 mm) should be considered suspicious.

Elevation
If a mole is elevated, or raised from of the skin, it should be considered suspicious.
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04-05-2011, 23:19   #13
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Nice one Cicero -even I can get that but what about .

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06-05-2011, 17:23   #14
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I check my nuts regularly enough, once you get in the habit of doing it I found I do it nearly by second nature now. As for prostate I'm getting tote age now where I should be getting it checked, no idea how to do it by myself (awkard enough to get to).

On a related note lads, if you do find anything and are worried about any embarrassment with the doctor feeling around, from experience the time I did find a lump and had to go to the fix and then get a scan. It's actually nothing to worry about, I suppose they see some much it's not a case of "oh, he's getting his balls out, followed by an immature laugh). But for Christ sake do get yourself checked soon as you notice anything.
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06-05-2011, 18:24   #15
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As for prostate I'm getting tote age now where I should be getting it checked, no idea how to do it by myself (awkard enough to get to).
I don't think you can do a DIY job on the DRE (Digital Rectal Examination)
The first port of call is generally a PSA (Prostate Serum Antigen) check, whick is a common or garden blood test. This is sent off and if it's above certain levels (depending on age) you may have a DRE done as well. The problem with a DRE examination is that a lot of it is down to the experience of the person doing it. My first consultant found nothing, while my second opinion guy thought initially that I was inoperable (i.e. too late) - T.G. it wasn't too late!

NB: It isn't just age, ethnicity and heredity come into it too. People of African extraction are more likely to have PCa, while anyone with 1 first degree relative, who has had PCa, is twice as likely to develop PCa. If two or more have had it, you're 5 to 11 times more likely to get it.

Its often referred to as "an old man's disease", with an average age of diagnosis of 69. However I was 55 and I know several men in their 40's who have/had it.

It's not all doom and gloom. Even if you are unlucky enough to develop it, the chances are that it will be a form that may need little or no treatment. Oth, unfortunately many of us develop "Tiger Cancer" (as opposed to "pussycat" Cancer.

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But for Christ sake do get yourself checked soon as you notice anything.
I don't know how many times I've heard of men who were afraid to go to the doctor for fear that they had "something". In most cases it was something small that was caught, if later than it might have been. In a few cases things had moved on too far.

I think the fear is that the doctor may tell them that they have (whatever). The fact that, by not going to the doctor, the ailment hasn't been named does not mean that it isn't there - head in sand syndrome.

Check it out!!

Last edited by Condo131; 06-05-2011 at 21:17.
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