Boards.ie uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Click here to find out more x
Post Reply  
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
15-12-2010, 15:13   #1
kc66
Registered User
 
kc66's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Kickin around on a piece of ground in my home town
Posts: 2,046
Can a car battery affect mpg?

Over the last 4/5 months I noticed the mpg in my car dropped from around 41/42 to 36/37. Theres been no change in driving habits or roads. At the same time the battery was always a bit dodgy. I replaced the battery a couple of weeks ago and the average mpg is back to around 41. Any way these are linked?
kc66 is offline  
Advertisement
15-12-2010, 15:22   #2
Seweryn
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Cill Chainnigh
Posts: 3,113
Send a message via Skype™ to Seweryn
Quote:
Originally Posted by kc66 View Post
Over the last 4/5 months I noticed the mpg in my car dropped from around 41/42 to 36/37. Theres been no change in driving habits or roads. At the same time the battery was always a bit dodgy. I replaced the battery a couple of weeks ago and the average mpg is back to around 41. Any way these are linked?
No... The mpg drop is due to colder weather - engine warms up longer than during milder weather conditions.
Seweryn is offline  
15-12-2010, 15:54   #3
mickdw
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 11,142
I guess if the battery was so bad that it wasnt taking proper charge, the alternator would be working overtime. If the alternator was continually pulling power from the engine, it would effect MPG
mickdw is offline  
(3) thanks from:
15-12-2010, 21:56   #4
martyc5674
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 923
If you swapped out your batt you may have reset your ECU. Depending on how you drove after the reset can effect MPG/ performance/ power
If you want it economical disconnect it for a few hours. Reconnect and drive it nice and handy

Marty
martyc5674 is offline  
15-12-2010, 21:58   #5
martyc5674
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 923
Mick is probably on the money tho!!
martyc5674 is offline  
Advertisement
15-12-2010, 22:21   #6
Pkiernan
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Arizona/Ireland
Posts: 1,345
A low battery being charged by an alternator would not lead to a 12% decrease in fuel economy!!

It might be a symptom of other issues though.
Pkiernan is offline  
Thanks from:
15-12-2010, 22:27   #7
si_guru
Registered User
 
si_guru's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Kerry
Posts: 2,317
What kind of car is it.... if it is a Land Rover ANTHING could be possible.
si_guru is offline  
15-12-2010, 23:12   #8
bmw535d
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,145
surely an alternator going full tilt all the time would increase fuel consumption?op did you change anything else? air filter perhaps?
bmw535d is offline  
15-12-2010, 23:22   #9
Pkiernan
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Arizona/Ireland
Posts: 1,345
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmw535d View Post
surely an alternator going full tilt all the time would increase fuel consumption?
Yes, but it would not cause such a massive decrease in fuel efficiency.
Pkiernan is offline  
Advertisement
16-12-2010, 01:02   #10
Nissan doctor
Closed Account
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 8,155
The rotational mass of the alternator doesn't change regardless of the electrical drain being put on it. So it cannot effect fuel economy on its own. If the battery/charging system is in poor condition then the reduction in power supply to the likes of the coil/coil packs could cause a reduction in economy due to a weaker spark.

However, I'm willing the bet the lower mpg is down to the cold weather and associated slower driving rather then some fault with the car.
Cold weather also reduces tyre pressure, which effects fuel consumption.
Nissan doctor is offline  
(2) thanks from:
16-12-2010, 02:59   #11
bmw535d
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,145
when you put a heavy electrical load on a car you can hear the revs decrease as the extra load in turn goes on the engine even with the idle control valve, there for an alternator on full load will use more fuel than an alternator with little load on it. why do you think modern cars charge the battery while braking?so as to not waste fuel with accelerating.
bmw535d is offline  
16-12-2010, 07:45   #12
Seweryn
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Cill Chainnigh
Posts: 3,113
Send a message via Skype™ to Seweryn
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nissan doctor View Post
The rotational mass of the alternator doesn't change regardless of the electrical drain being put on it. So it cannot effect fuel economy on its own. If the battery/charging system is in poor condition then the reduction in power supply to the likes of the coil/coil packs could cause a reduction in economy due to a weaker spark.
It actually would affect the mpg. I didn't read up the original post correctly. If the battery is really bad - as bad that you would have to jump start the car every time and if the battery consumes a lot of current to get charged, then the engine will burn more fuel to produce the extra energy.
Seweryn is offline  
16-12-2010, 09:37   #13
kc66
Registered User
 
kc66's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Kickin around on a piece of ground in my home town
Posts: 2,046
The car is a 1.8 2001 Volvo S40. I don't think it can be weather related as it started happening around August or September.
The battery was not so bad it had to be jump started every time but if lights or radio were left on for 10 minutes while the engine was off it would probably have to be jump started. When the cold weather came a couple of weeks ago, if it hadn't been driven for a day it would need a jump start.
kc66 is offline  
16-12-2010, 09:42   #14
Flyer1
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 558
Simple answer: No
Flyer1 is offline  
16-12-2010, 10:20   #15
bbam
Closed Account
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 7,349
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nissan doctor View Post
The rotational mass of the alternator doesn't change regardless of the electrical drain being put on it. So it cannot effect fuel economy on its own. If the battery/charging system is in poor condition then the reduction in power supply to the likes of the coil/coil packs could cause a reduction in economy due to a weaker spark.

However, I'm willing the bet the lower mpg is down to the cold weather and associated slower driving rather then some fault with the car.
Cold weather also reduces tyre pressure, which effects fuel consumption.
I appreciate what you are saying about the rotational mass being constant as the alternator is contstantly being turned by the fan belt..
However when the alternator is actively charging the EMF of the power being generated is what increases the resistance thus slightly loading the engine, I use the word slightly as it would be essentially neglegable to the overall fuel consumption.. And I wouldn't expect it to cause the drop in mpg seen by OP.
bbam is offline  
Post Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Remove Text Formatting
Bold
Italic
Underline

Insert Image
Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text
 
Decrease Size
Increase Size
Please sign up or log in to join the discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Share Tweet