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10-03-2009, 13:32   #16
flyswatter
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Should I be looking at another college to study music technology in then? Apart from Maynooth, what colleges offer it?
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10-03-2009, 15:19   #17
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Well I'd start with what they've done so far, an introductory course in the basics for anyone who isn't familiar. That might last 6 weeks (not 6 months). I would increasde the hours per week to maybe 12-16 at least (25 if that was possible), up from 4. Then I'd move into actual practical work. A couple of classes of synth programming (as opposed to a one hour lab), a course acoustics (which we are doing and I have no problems with this part of the course), a few hours of basic studio work (mic placement, signal chains, some Cubase and ProTools work) and some live-style work (theres a venue in the university that would be perfect). We could also do some foundation in programming, allowing people to choose to continue in that field in second year. That would be first year to me.
Thing is you can't really increase the hours when students are st udying two other subjects as well. If you were starting from scratch I think you would find that's a lot of work to cover in four modules over the year. The Acoustics and Computer Music modules are necessary to ensure everyone has an understanding in these areas - you'd get nowhere without at least basic knowledge in these areas. The Theory module I personally found very useful, as I had very little prior knowledge in that area. The only module I might agree with changing a little would be the Synthesis one. But in saying that, the lecturer for that module is one of the most helpful I've had, and if you showed any interest in delving deeper into the subject than he has time for in class he would do his best to assist you.

But I guess that's just my opinion.
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10-03-2009, 16:20   #18
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Yes it would be too much if we were all doing three subjects but I don't see the need for that. The BMus system would be way better, just one other subject.

Well if we had 2 hours of theory (I agree, very useful), 2 hours of acoustics, 4 hours of computer music introduction (MIDI, Cubase, Protools) and 2 hours of synthesis a week in the first semester that would hardly be too much to ask would it? Its only 10 hours. Add another arts subject onto that and you get 14/15 hours a week. Then in second semester you could move onto 2 hours of more advanced synthesis, 2 hours of computer music, 2 hours studio time, 2 hours live work. Add in a couple of labs or tutorials to make it ten hours and you're sorted. We'd be a million miles ahead of where we stand now.

My problem is I think we fall behind the likes of the graduates from the STC. I saw them at work at the Button Factory the other night and I thought to myself, I wonder what would happen if my class was to attempt this. Disaster I'd say.
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10-03-2009, 17:01   #19
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Isn't the MA in Computer Music more what you're looking for then?
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10-03-2009, 17:55   #20
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Should I be looking at another college to study music technology in then? Apart from Maynooth, what colleges offer it?
I'm really sorry, I'm totally hijacking your thread!

Theres the course in the University of Limerick which I know next to nothing about. The one in Tralee IT is supposed to be a few steps below Maynooth according to my uncle who worked there for a few years.

After that you're looking at private courses (i.e. paying courses) like Pulse and the Sound Training Centre in Temple Bar in Dublin. These are one year courses, full-time or part-time. You can check out the relevant websites and stuff, all the info should be there. If you can, have a meeting with some members of staff at the different places, most should have no problem having a chat with you if you display some interest.

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Isn't the MA in Computer Music more what you're looking for then?
Can't do an MA without a BA first.
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18-03-2009, 20:53   #21
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Bump.
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24-03-2009, 14:58   #22
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yup

i have to say as someone who just left second year in this course that i agree with every argument AridStarling has made. i found this course to be awful. incredibly slow paced. also i agree with the point that the course should be more dedicated. currently music technology is taken with two arts subjects in first year and then in second year one subject must be dropped. as said above perhaps the BA Mus system would work better.
if music production or recording or anything like it is what you are interested in i would recommened you look elsewhere. pulse and STC have very good reputations but are expensive. unfortunately i cant give you any information on the courses in limerick or tralee, other than that they exist.
i must say though as a college maynooth is fantastic. there is a great friendly, social atmosphere.

sorry i know that was a very long post. hope it helps anyway
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31-03-2009, 20:57   #23
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there is a music tech course in lit a mate of mine is doing. he said there is alot more practical based stuff than theory. and he also does stuff like networks and other computer based stuff so i guess ur goin to get that where ever you go.
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01-04-2009, 18:00   #24
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I was thinking about changing to this from Media Arts in DIT but after reading some of the reports on here about the course being slow I am having second thoughts.

I love electronic (dance) music and listen to it at every given moment. I enjoy artists like Future Sound of London and Sasha and Digweed. I have tried my hand at producing songs via reason and fruity loops.

Has anyone got any more discussion on the topic? Do you really have to have your application in before march 15th like it says on the website?

What kind of jobs can I expect with a degree like this?

Thanks.
Daniel.
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09-04-2009, 15:17   #25
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Originally Posted by disssco View Post
I was thinking about changing to this from Media Arts in DIT but after reading some of the reports on here about the course being slow I am having second thoughts.

I love electronic (dance) music and listen to it at every given moment. I enjoy artists like Future Sound of London and Sasha and Digweed. I have tried my hand at producing songs via reason and fruity loops.

Has anyone got any more discussion on the topic? Do you really have to have your application in before march 15th like it says on the website?

What kind of jobs can I expect with a degree like this?

Thanks.
Daniel.
The thing about the course is that it is a broad music technology degree. It is not centered on composing music, nor is it centered on recording, nor on technology. Rather it incorporates elements of each of these, computer science, composition and production/recording, even a little bit of biology and physics.

If someone goes in and they've got a narrow range of interest in what they want to do, they may not enjoy the course. Also, if you already have a grasp on some of the stuff you may find it a little slow at times, as the course has to start from scratch on everything.

But if you start this course open to taking your musical interests in other directions, and open to working other foundations on which to build, for instance, computer programming, then you might just enjoy it.

Don't forget it's a joint honours degree so you take two other subjects in 1st year and drop one in second year.
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12-07-2009, 19:53   #26
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Read this before asking: "What to expect from [subject]?" ALL SUBJECT INFO HERE!

To prevent a series of threads asking about what various subjects are like, here's a thread with all the opinions you're gonna need. (Or at least there will be opinions as time goes on)


Granted, it will never be as epic as Roz's discussion thread, but it's easier than posting the same info over and over again.


Last edited by allandanyways; 12-07-2009 at 20:59.
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12-07-2009, 20:13   #27
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I'm going into Third Year BA, studying Spanish and English.
The Spanish programme hasn't changed but the English one has, I did First Year of the old programme so perhaps someone who did First Year English 08-09 could offer experiences here, and if anyone has questions about Second Year, I'd be happy to help.

SPANISH

Probably one of the most relaxed departments in the college, the staff are great and comprise of the dept. head who lectures occasionally, the Dr's and Professors who give lectures in their area of expertise (moreso in Second and Third Year) and then a series of language tutors who tutor you in first and second year (not sure about third year, except for Dani still doing the labs).
N.B. Attendance is compulsory to all classes, and accounts towards your overall mark in each module. Also, the classes tend to move quite quickly, so if you miss something it really is essential to catch up because the Spanish dept. generally don't use moodle.

FIRST YEAR
  • Consists of 4 language classes with your tutor, and is divided into beginners and advanced, which will all be sorted out within the first month or so after an exam, but up until Xmas, you can still change levels if you feel that Beginners is too easy or that Advanced is too hard.
  • You get homework - tareas- each week or so, and these consist some percentage of your module (cant remember how much exactly). They can seem a little fecky but they are important and they count towards your mark. The tutors tend to be quite strict about deadlines for these and generally set dates and they won't accept them after that.
  • You also have an English Language class based on Spanish Literature during the Franco Era (Sem 1) and Latin American Literature and Society (Sem 2), and these are both examined by essay.
  • You have a 1 hour language lab every week and attendance is compulsory and the marks in this class contribute to your overall module mark. These labs usually focus intensly on your oral and aural skills, and they are hugely beneficial, so don't skip them.


Second Year
is much more varied, with the opportunity to pick 2 different options each semester according to your interests;
  • Options including Latin Am. poetry, Cinema and Literature, Phonetics, Portuguese, Modern Spanish Literature (which is really good), European Cinema... loads basically.
  • In addition to these, you have 4 hours classes, which is broken up into 2 hours of a grammar module and 2 hours of a Communications module, which focuses on your reading and writing skills.
  • There is a good bit of work. The tareas are more intense and can take a while to complete, some require research and some just require revision of basic grammar skills. Most of the options are assessed on essay, although I think Phonetics is assessed throughout a series of tasks set.
  • You still have your Lab every week and also a grammar clinic which helps focus on the weak points of the grammar that you may be having problems with.

I cannot stress enough that the Spanish dept. are extremley helpful, and most of the tutors bend over backwards to ensure that you understand everything and all the staff will help you with anything you need during their office hours.
You are encouraged to speak Spanish all the time, it's not considered showing off to speak out or ask a question, even if it may seem intimidating. The tutors will always say that sometimes the only thing holding someone back from excelling in a language is that they are afraid to speak the language...
The classes tend to be pretty small with a good bond formed at the end of the year, which is sad when you get to the end of Second Year and half the class feck off on Erasmus!
I'll keep ye updated on whether or not Third Year is such a joy

Last edited by allandanyways; 12-07-2009 at 20:18.
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21-07-2009, 23:27   #28
geurrp the yard
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Quote:
Originally Posted by allandanyways View Post
I'm going into Third Year BA, studying Spanish and English.
The Spanish programme hasn't changed but the English one has, I did First Year of the old programme so perhaps someone who did First Year English 08-09 could offer experiences here, and if anyone has questions about Second Year, I'd be happy to help.

SPANISH

Probably one of the most relaxed departments in the college, the staff are great and comprise of the dept. head who lectures occasionally, the Dr's and Professors who give lectures in their area of expertise (moreso in Second and Third Year) and then a series of language tutors who tutor you in first and second year (not sure about third year, except for Dani still doing the labs).
N.B. Attendance is compulsory to all classes, and accounts towards your overall mark in each module. Also, the classes tend to move quite quickly, so if you miss something it really is essential to catch up because the Spanish dept. generally don't use moodle.

FIRST YEAR
  • Consists of 4 language classes with your tutor, and is divided into beginners and advanced, which will all be sorted out within the first month or so after an exam, but up until Xmas, you can still change levels if you feel that Beginners is too easy or that Advanced is too hard.
  • You get homework - tareas- each week or so, and these consist some percentage of your module (cant remember how much exactly). They can seem a little fecky but they are important and they count towards your mark. The tutors tend to be quite strict about deadlines for these and generally set dates and they won't accept them after that.
  • You also have an English Language class based on Spanish Literature during the Franco Era (Sem 1) and Latin American Literature and Society (Sem 2), and these are both examined by essay.
  • You have a 1 hour language lab every week and attendance is compulsory and the marks in this class contribute to your overall module mark. These labs usually focus intensly on your oral and aural skills, and they are hugely beneficial, so don't skip them.


Second Year
is much more varied, with the opportunity to pick 2 different options each semester according to your interests;
  • Options including Latin Am. poetry, Cinema and Literature, Phonetics, Portuguese, Modern Spanish Literature (which is really good), European Cinema... loads basically.
  • In addition to these, you have 4 hours classes, which is broken up into 2 hours of a grammar module and 2 hours of a Communications module, which focuses on your reading and writing skills.
  • There is a good bit of work. The tareas are more intense and can take a while to complete, some require research and some just require revision of basic grammar skills. Most of the options are assessed on essay, although I think Phonetics is assessed throughout a series of tasks set.
  • You still have your Lab every week and also a grammar clinic which helps focus on the weak points of the grammar that you may be having problems with.

I cannot stress enough that the Spanish dept. are extremley helpful, and most of the tutors bend over backwards to ensure that you understand everything and all the staff will help you with anything you need during their office hours.
You are encouraged to speak Spanish all the time, it's not considered showing off to speak out or ask a question, even if it may seem intimidating. The tutors will always say that sometimes the only thing holding someone back from excelling in a language is that they are afraid to speak the language...
The classes tend to be pretty small with a good bond formed at the end of the year, which is sad when you get to the end of Second Year and half the class feck off on Erasmus!
I'll keep ye updated on whether or not Third Year is such a joy
Hi, as I understand, the college offers a course called beginners spanish.What way does that work?
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22-07-2009, 00:13   #29
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Hi, as I understand, the college offers a course called beginners spanish.What way does that work?
Yup, beginners Spanish is offered in first year if you have no experience speaking the language or struggled with it in school. The course is taught by some professors in the dept. who are native English speakers as opposed to the native Spanish tutors who tutor advanced spanish and 2nd year classes.

You elect yourself which level you would prefer to study when you register with the department, and as I said before, you can change if you want.

Beginners Spanish literally starts from "Hola" and works its way up, it moves at a relatively fast pace and covers alot of the basic grammar and expression work that has you on a more or less equal footing with the advanced class come 2nd Year. I did advanced Spanish in 1st year but in my Second year class, half the class had done beginners Spanish and caught up grand, you just have to be prepared to put alot of effort in.
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22-07-2009, 00:13   #30
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Economics? Any ordinary maths leaving cert students struggle with the maths side of it at third level???
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