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24-05-2014, 23:44   #226
JamesMitch98
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Agri Business and Food Management UCD anyone?
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27-05-2014, 16:39   #227
Mugatuu
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I can give info on Culinary Arts level 6 in WIT and then I went on to study applied food science with business management in St.Angelas College in Sligo. If ye have any questions about either of those courses fire away!
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29-05-2014, 10:37   #228
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Anyone have any information on either Business and Management in Maynooth or Bachelor of Business Studies in DCU? These are the 2 courses I find myself torn between.
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29-05-2014, 17:48   #229
Louisew97
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Originally Posted by C_S_OBrien View Post
Doing French and Spanish in TCD - in first year- if anyone wants info on that
I'm mainly thinking of business and Spanish but also considering spanish as part of tsm at the moment .if you could give me some information on subjects lecturers pros/cons and anything else that would be great gracias
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29-05-2014, 19:34   #230
robman60
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Just wondering could anyone give any info for business and law? I've read some very useful posts here from people who've done one or the other, but would love to know how people find the two together!

I'm considering doing it in Trinity or UCD but I'm leaning towards Trinity as it's a law major and I messed up the application process for accommodation in UCD!

Were the hours manageable?
Was law very difficult with a steep learning curve/complex jargon?
What are the lecturers like?
Is the social side challenging?

I'd love to hear some feedback on any/all of the above. Is law largely theoretical or applied? As in, do lectures revolve around real life cases or just learning from books? I'd prefer the former as I have a keen interest in how cases influence society/the legal framework.

I'd be particularly interested in hearing about the social side as I'd be coming from Mayo and only one of my good friends is thinking of Dublin and he's not awfully sure. I'm not shy really but I think I'll find it pretty hard on my own!

Any feedback much appreciated.
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31-05-2014, 23:34   #231
Jackson07
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Does anyone have info on GMIT- general nursing? Thanks
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03-06-2014, 22:11   #232
icanplaydrums
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Anybody have any info on Journalism in DCU? Cheers
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05-06-2014, 00:39   #233
playedalive
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Originally Posted by Louisew97 View Post
I'm mainly thinking of business and Spanish but also considering spanish as part of tsm at the moment .if you could give me some information on subjects lecturers pros/cons and anything else that would be great gracias
I graduated last year in TSM French and Spanish, so I can tell you about Spanish. What I will say to you is that if you're going to study a language in college, particularly Trinity, you really do need to know what you're getting yourself into. I won't lie. I do have a bit of a bee in my bonnet after my experience and I really did not know what studying a pure language degree entailed.

When you're studying languages in Trinity, the first year comes across as being quite balanced with grammar, language classes and 1/2 modules in literature. However, after 1st year, the overwhelming emphasis of this course is understanding, reading and producing arguments in relation to the Spanish/French literature on your course. That's great if you like literature. I like reading myself because the sheer emphasis on literature really did not help my communication skills in Spanish. Of course, it might have helped my understanding of the language, but it was my own efforts to meet Spanish people, go to Spain and having a genuine interest in learning the language myself is what has made me fluent in Spanish today-not the Trinity course, believe it or not. Sorry if I sound really negative, but I was definitely disillusioned by the course and was glad to have finished in the end. At the end of the day, if you want to learn Spanish, it's up to you to learn it and you can feel in the degree that they already expect you to have a high fluency in the language after you enter, or at the maximum, second year of college (which is tough on the beginners). I was very lucky to have been an exchange student in a Secondary school in Spain and exposed to Spanish at a young age. This definitely helped.

Now, Business and Spanish would be a different kettle of fish because you would be focusing on learning communicative Spanish for business and, also, you are expected to go to Spain for a year on Erasmus, which will do wonders for your Spanish provided you have a genuine interest and are willing to learn the language.

Edit: I should have also mentioned that there are language classes (Grammar and Translation- 2 hours a week) and oral (1 hour a week), but by third year, you will be mostly translating literary texts from English into Spanish and Spanish to English in class and for homework. The grammar points might be discussed in class. In fairness, I did find translation did help me with my grammar bur grammar translation is really the only method through which the language is taught, and, as a trained language teacher myself, grammar translation on its own does not develop communication skills. All the classes are taught mostly in English, except for the oral classes. Again, I have to call a spade a spade, for the level that you are expected to leave with, 1 hour of spoken Spanish a week is not helpful (classes can be a hit and a miss) and all the classes should have really been taught through Spanish insofar as possible. Literature study is the speciality of this course/department, except for the odd linguistics and Spanish History module.

Last edited by playedalive; 05-06-2014 at 10:26. Reason: Needed to clarify more points
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05-06-2014, 00:43   #234
Mr Pseudonym
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Originally Posted by playedalive View Post
I graduated last year in TSM Spanish. What I will say to you is that if you're going to study a language in college, particularly Trinity, you really do need to know what you're getting yourself into. I won't lie. I do have a bit of a bee in my bonnet after my experience and I really did not know what studying a pure language degree entails.

When you're studying languages in Trinity, the first year comes across as being quite balanced with grammar, language classes and 1/2 modules in literature. However, after 1st year, the overwhelming emphasis of this course is understanding, reading and arguing complex Spanish/French literature. That's great if you like literature. I like reading myself because the sheer emphasis on literature which really did not help my communication skills in Spanish. Of course, it might have helped my understanding of the language, but it was my own efforts to meet Spanish people, go to Spain and having a genuine interest in learning the language myself is what has made me fluent in Spanish today-not the Trinity course, believe it or not. Sorry if I sound really negative, but I was definitely disillusioned by the course and was glad to have finished in the end. At the end of the day, if you want to learn Spanish, it's up to you to learn it and you can feel in the degree that they already expect you to have a high fluency in the language after you enter, or at the maximum, second year of college (which is tough on the beginners). I was very lucky to be in all Spanish speaking environments as a kid/teen.

Now, Business and Spanish would be a different kettle of fish because you would be focusing on learning communicative Spanish for business and, also, you are expected to go to Spain for a year on Erasmus, which will do wonders for your Spanish provided you have a genuine interest and are willing to learn the language.
I found that very interesting.
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05-06-2014, 22:10   #235
sylviaplath32
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Anyone doing Biology in Maynooth? Even if you go to Maynooth, how do you find it?
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05-06-2014, 22:37   #236
tkd93
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Course:
Bachelor of Business (Honours) in Accounting & Finance IT Tallaght

Points:
230 in 2013

Number of students:
Started with about 80 when I was in 1st year may have changed since then. In years one and two you will have lectures with only half of the total number of students are we are split into two class groups.

Hours:
Varies from between 17-20. Very manageable as lectures are spread over Monday to Friday.

Course Content:
In year one you will study a wide array of business areas including accounting, law, economic,s business administration, business maths and computers. You do not need to have studied any subjects business wise at leaving cert level. I didnt do accounting myself and had no issues. Also in year one additional tutorials are provided in accounting and business maths . This involves smaller group sizes with a lecturer which really helps anyone struggling with the basics. Business admin accounting and economics in addition to every other subject are taken from scratch. From second year onward the range narrows to mainly cover the areas of accounting (both financial and management) financial investment tax and auditing. The course provided you get the relevant grades enjoys a large amount of exemptions from professional bodies. In 3rd and 4th years a wide range of speakers are brought in to give us advice on employment opportunities and further study options. So far in third year some of the speakers included EY BOI Chartered Accountants of Ireland NUIM and Davys Stockbrokers.

IT Tallaght operates very differently from some of the larger colleges. I am on a first name basis with every single one of my lecturers. If you don't understand a point the lecturers are happy to go over any point. No one is the class minds if you ask a ton of questions. Many of the lectures are delivered in secondary school sized rooms so it feels alot more personal. Even in the large lectures rooms which seat about 140 there is never more then 40 or 50 people.

One final point which I feel very important to be included is that people shouldn't be put off by the low points. Plenty of people in my year myself included scored in the high 300s or low 400s. There are plenty of reasons why people chose to do this course other then its low points requirements. The course has provided me with an in dept knowledge of accounting. I look forward to starting fourth year in September. Any questions about the course or college in general i will be happy to answer.
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09-06-2014, 13:44   #237
CailinGaillimh
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MI 007 - B.A. Early Childhood Care & Education (Mary Immaculate College)

Points:
I think it was about 390 (2010), but I've heard they've gone up since!

Class sizes:
Fluctuates year to year, 60 started with me, we're finishing with 65/66. Numbers stand around the 70 mark for this year's 1st year group.

What it's like:
Great for anyone who's interested in education. A very practical course. Depending on the semester, you would average about 5 modules per semester. One of which is professional development which focuses on both practical experiences and reflecting on your own practice. Modules cover: foundation studies, language acquisition, sociology, psychology, creativity, theoretical perspectives & the dreaded dissertation to name but a few!

For a 4 year degree, you cover a multitude. Assessments differ depending on the module but continuous assessment & an exam seems to be the most popular assessment method. ECCE is the type of degree that if you put the work into your modules you'll reap the benefits come your final year. Although modules are stand alone and there are very few continuations of modules, come your fourth year you can see the links between modules in first year to date.

First year & second year are largely spent on campus with a few work placements beginning in your second semester of first year. In your third year of the degree, you spend a semester off campus on placement. There are options to go abroad, but many of the students use it to dip their toes into whichever career path they are thinking about. Fourth year is mainly focused on you as a childcare worker, how you perceive the various modules & of course your dissertation. There is a lot of support available, especially during fourth year from both lecturers and supervisors.

Personal:
Although classified as an Arts degree, the B.A. ECCE is an education based degree. It's a perfect foundation level degree for someone who wants to work with children but is unsure of whether or not they want to go and become a primary school teacher. The degree can be tough at times, but if you put the work in you should never be too swamped with work. I think we had 22 hours at most of lectures a week over the 4 years, but you need to be able to read as you're expected to read so much during the hours you're not timetabled to be in college!
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16-06-2014, 20:19   #238
HauntedGhost
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Has anyone done International Business and Languages in DIT or Commerce in NUIG? Thank you.
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20-06-2014, 16:26   #239
LC.student2014
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Does anyone have any information/advice/experiences they would like to share about veterinary nursing in UCD or Law plus in UL?
I can't decide what to do and the deadline for CAO is approaching quickly!
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21-06-2014, 01:07   #240
caitlinc_97
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[quote="SarahBeep!;73914384"]I do Science Ed in UL and have friends doing PE, what to you wanna know?



Tough but if you enjoy it won't seem half as bad, very physics, the lads have gymnastics modules, swimming modules, all sorts of stuff! Pretty full timetable
compared to business/arts, 30ish hours a week??
The education modules can be a bit boring but if you stick with it its really easy to get an A

I'm hoping on doing Biology in UL but everyone keeps nagging me about the lack of career prospects and the course isn't very popular! Your opinion would be greatly appreciated
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