Garden Drainage: Start to finish - Page 6 - boards.ie
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05-10-2009, 08:57   #76
Waffle
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Hi all,
I am in the throes of a garden drainage project. Thanks to "The Duk " for the piping.

Original plan was to mix the excavated soil with compost/sand and reuse. However it is a heavy clay and far worse than I imagined and there is far more of it too.

What is the best way to get rid of this? Do councils provide a facility for this type of "waste"?

Cheers,
Waffle.
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05-10-2009, 17:07   #77
wreckless
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know any farmers? tractor and trailors are very handy, and cheap.

if not, a skip is one sure way, and quick, dropped one day and collected when full, different sizes available. id say i removed about 8 ton of crap useless soil in the garden, marly, sticky stuff. if you have good topsoil, heap it one side and re-use it when levelling off
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22-10-2009, 10:30   #78
torourke
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Looks great! I wish I had done a proper job day 1 like yourself! inspiring to see the photos! Well done!
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13-12-2009, 10:59   #79
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Well Done!

Well done! The pictures look good but I bet your back and arms were sore! Was it worth it for such a small, space all the drainage and that.
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15-12-2009, 21:59   #80
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good job is there anywhere in dublin you can buy all landscape material in one place turf soil paving etc instead of different places???
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15-12-2009, 22:13   #81
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Wreckless,

That last photographs is outstanding. Well done!

It's a joy to see there are so many people who are willing to roll up the shirtsleeves and get on with a bit of work. I thought I was one of a dying breed.

Delly, could I suggest you get rid of the tree. It's a cedar of some description and will get huge.
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17-12-2009, 09:14   #82
treesireland
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well done , great effort. my coment will make you cross , but i do not meen any ofince. your garden will benafit from your diging , you could hav achived the same result by spending the price of a box of grass seed, the plants growing in the garden told the thru storey, the soil was good , the hool you dug proved this , the only thing the garden needed was to be dug over and reseeded, but for such good effort i wood let you into my garden any day,
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17-12-2009, 09:18   #83
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The cedar has been severely cut back last year, and will probably be reduced again this year. I have been told they are great at sucking up thee excess water, so it can only help.

Even now a few years later, the drainage is working well. I can happily make it to the shed in the Winter without suffering the squelch underneath my feet. The quality of the grass however has taken a hit, and is patchy in parts despite getting some good lawnfeed. I think its just a case of the soil is the crappiest of the crap, but theres not much I can do about that i'm afraid.
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17-12-2009, 10:38   #84
GreeBo
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well done , great effort. my coment will make you cross , but i do not meen any ofince. your garden will benafit from your diging , you could hav achived the same result by spending the price of a box of grass seed, the plants growing in the garden told the thru storey, the soil was good , the hool you dug proved this , the only thing the garden needed was to be dug over and reseeded, but for such good effort i wood let you into my garden any day,
Based on the water in the second photo I would have to disagree.
My garden has taken a ridiculous amount of water of the last months and has never looked like that.

There was definitely a drainage issue here.
Excellent job OP, lovely wall also.
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17-12-2009, 10:55   #85
Dizzyblonde
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delly, I just want to thank you for putting up the photos originally. We followed your method earlier this year and I'm happy to report that we haven't had as much as a little puddle in our garden since. It used to become a lake every time it rained and even the torrential rain we and a while back made no impact.
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17-12-2009, 15:22   #86
treesireland
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yes there was a dranage problem. the two plants at the back of the garden how ever told a conflicting storey , these 2 plants mainly triv in good wel draned soils, the fact that they were growing besid awall meens they head shelter, it also meens it would hav been dryer , but the soil profil looked good, but if the soil is good and the dranage is bad,,,,,,how is this ???????? the ans to this is in the history of how the small urben gardens are put in place,
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07-03-2010, 10:52   #87
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this is my garden. Its wet during the winter and a few steps on one spot creates mud. Garden chairs sink in it even during summer.


its not big. that is a 4m ladder on the ground.


I seen dellys fantastic work

I was thinking that all those trenches would be wasted effort and money in my much smaller plot.

Could I pick your brains on this idea instead.


This is a rough pic of what I would like to do.



Dig a trench through the hard packed sub soil I have and simply fill it with washed stone. maybe 1 ton bag full. As the garden is so small Im thinking the surrounding area would drain into the same hole through the top soil.


Would this work..??? All it would cost is a ton of stone
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07-03-2010, 15:43   #88
Sneachta
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Q for Delly

Hi all,

Just wondering when you filled in the large hole with rocks what did you put on top of the rocks? Do you put some kind of barrier between rocks and soil above? How high with rocks did you fill the hole?
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07-03-2010, 22:27   #89
delly
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Would this work..??? All it would cost is a ton of stone
I'm not sure tbh. I think you would defo have some relief but it may only exist above the soak pit and a small bit further. Having only known my own situation, in your case if not using the pipes etc., then personally i'd create 3 soakpits of smaller size going left to right at the front middle and back of the garden.
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Hi all,

Just wondering when you filled in the large hole with rocks what did you put on top of the rocks? Do you put some kind of barrier between rocks and soil above? How high with rocks did you fill the hole?
Its going a while back now, but iirc, I used gradually smaller stones as I got to the top of the pit and left maybe a foot of topsoil on it. I covered over the top of the stones with the same weed stop material you see in the pics, then put a few layers of chicken wire on top of it to help it not to move over time. I also danced a jig or two to make sure the stone was all compacted and not going to move once the soil went on top.
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07-03-2010, 22:32   #90
W.B. Yeats
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Drainage? Dog? Quick Fix?

Folks

Typical Dublin housing estate garden- water logged in winter and usually dry in the summer when there is good weather but it can take a good while to dry out when it rains.

WE have a dog though and it makes it hard on the drying as he runs up and down the garden. currently the 5 foot at the bottom of the garden is just in muck, all the grass is gone. Result is he drags in the muck into the house which isn't good for hygiene with a young baby crawling around.

There is also a drain cover in the middle of the garden- think its a sewer that's underneath

Now I reckon there is a drainage issue of some sort, I don't have the time, or the skill to build this French drain solution myself and think that grass might be a no no anyway with the dog.
So a few questions:

1. If I went for the drainage with the French drains is there some ultra tough wearing grass that could tolerate a dog? Typically how much would this cost to get a landscaper or gardener to do ( garden is probably 18 feet by 30 feet) ? Any recommendations in Dublin?

2. Is there another option of putting down gravel or some sort of loose pebble in the garden that would get us over the drainage issue without having to dig the drains? Would I have to dig up the grass, put down some sort of membrane over the soil before putting down gravel? How much would this cost? Any recommendations?

Sorry for the 20 questions but I need a solution that isn't mad expensive and that I can get done in the next few weeks.
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