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06-05-2006, 21:23   #1
katyk
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Salary scale for Primary/Secondary Teaching

Hi
Im just wondering if anyone knows if the salary scale for secondary and primary teaching are the same? Also if you have a degree do you get more money, I seen on education.ie that you get an extra 4000 or something like that for an honours degree. Is that a once off in your first year of teaching or do you get that every year you teach? Also, is it any type of honours degree or does it have to be an honours degree in education or something. For example my degree is in IT, would I be entitled to the allowance.
Also, does anyone know the name of anywhere that I can do the Leaving Cert honours Irish, as I only done pass in school .I seen this is a requirement for primary teaching.
Thanks
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06-05-2006, 21:28   #2
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The salary scale is probably some where on www.education.ie.

Should it be for the love of teaching and not money
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06-05-2006, 21:35   #3
Enright
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teaching

no the two salary scales are different
for exact details go to www.tui.ie or www.asti.ie for those in secordary schools, try www.into.ie for those in primary

in relation to allowances, these are annual allowances, you can only claim the highest one ie a degree or first or second class degree or masters etc,
there is about a 3500 difference between a honours degree or a pass

you might be entitled to other allowances ie for teaching through irish, having a hdip,

there is no restriction in what area one has there degree in, but in order to gain full time employment, it should be in education, with vec schools this restriction might not apply, same for havin a hdip
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13-05-2006, 15:27   #4
spurious
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Teachers are paid on the Common Basic Scale - it applies to Primary and Second Level Teachers.

There is not a different scale for each sector.

The academic allowance for an Hons. degree is 4,576. It is the degree you are using for your job, presumably. It is given each year once you have been made permanent, or if in a pro-rata position it is given annually on a pro-rata basis.

Those who have Hons. degrees in Education have generally done Education degrees and would not be claiming the H. Dip allowance.

You have a degree in IT and you want to do primary teaching? I would expect you'd have to do a teaching degree or course first. If you wanted to do second-level teaching, you could do the H. Dip. - to be honest, IT would be more suited to second level.

Full time permanent jobs at second-level are few and far between since the introduction of CIDs (Contracts of Indefinite Duration) - expect to do up to ten years on a pro-rata or less than maximum hours contract before gaining permanency (or whatever its equivalent is under CID).

Last edited by spurious; 13-05-2006 at 15:35.
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13-05-2006, 20:19   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spurious
Those who have Hons. degrees in Education have generally done Education degrees and would not be claiming the H. Dip allowance.

You have a degree in IT and you want to do primary teaching? I would expect you'd have to do a teaching degree or course first.

I have an honours degree in IT and Im doing a post grad in primary teaching.. as have a lot of people I've met. The trend in primary teaching from now on will include an increase in people with other work experience going on to to do post grads in primary education and bringing that life experience into the classroom.

You do not have to have an education degree to sub teach. Although the principals have to look for qualified people if they need a sub, in reality theres plenty of degree holders in all disciplines picking up short term subbing in primary schools while they persue the post grad qualification.
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16-05-2006, 21:55   #6
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I got an island allowance and an allowance for teaching through Irish
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18-05-2006, 09:21   #7
katyk
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Thanks for your replies. Just a few more things:

1. Trotter, you said you were in IT and moved to Primary teaching, do you think it was a good move for you? I know you are still doing your post grad and arent out there teaching full time but in your experience, are you glad you made the move? Im just a bit anxious because its quite a big change for me. Had you been working in IT for long or had you done the post grad straight after you finished your IT degree?

2. Also, how do you get into sub teaching. I spoke to a couple of people who are primary teaching and they said this is pretty much a must if you want to get into the post grad. One of them said there is a text service you can register for on www.education.ie, but Ive looked and cant find anything there. Suppose with the summer coming in there wouldnt be any sub teaching anyway. Do you know if is there anything else I could do during the summer that would give me some teaching experience?

3. I wasnt aware that full time permanent jobs in second level teaching are hard to get. Are many people finding it hard to get work after their post grad?

4. When you come out of your post grad, do you have to do a years probation teaching period or anything before you are recognised as a fully qualified teacher? I seen this was the case with the UK courses, just wondering if its the same here.
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18-05-2006, 16:48   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katyk
Thanks for your replies. Just a few more things:
1. Trotter, you said you were in IT and moved to Primary teaching, do you think it was a good move for you? I know you are still doing your post grad and arent out there teaching full time but in your experience, are you glad you made the move? Im just a bit anxious because its quite a big change for me. Had you been working in IT for long or had you done the post grad straight after you finished your IT degree?
Im doing the Hibernia post grad so I spend my days studying and in class as Im subbing pretty much fulltime in 1 secondary school. I never actually worked in IT.. I went from job to job for a year when I graduated and then decided to try subbing at secondary level for a while til I found something good.. Im still at it Through subbing there, the principal in the local national school rang me to cover one day and that was it.. I was hooked on primary teaching. Its much much more rewarding. Where else would you get a terry's chocolate orange after the "team" had a whip round to say goodbye to me after I'd covered for their teacher for a week ??

Quote:
Originally Posted by katyk
2. Also, how do you get into sub teaching. I spoke to a couple of people who are primary teaching and they said this is pretty much a must if you want to get into the post grad. One of them said there is a text service you can register for on www.education.ie, but Ive looked and cant find anything there. Suppose with the summer coming in there wouldnt be any sub teaching anyway. Do you know if is there anything else I could do during the summer that would give me some teaching experience?
There wont be a whole lot of subbing going between now and June, but there'll always be some little bits and pieces around. I basically went to my old secondary school and handed in a CV 3 years ago, and said it was something I was interested in trying out. Like I said.. Im still there! Summer teaching experience thats relevant to the post grad... any kind of summer camp for kids I suppose!

The text a sub site is:
http://www.educationposts.ie/primary...r%20text-a-sub
The thing to do also is to register with your local teachers centre. They often provide principals with names of available subs during the year.

Quote:
Originally Posted by katyk
3. I wasnt aware that full time permanent jobs in second level teaching are hard to get. Are many people finding it hard to get work after their post grad?
Yes. Many of the people who get secondary post grads are getting sub work or temporary contracts, but few are getting fulltime jobs immediately.

Quote:
Originally Posted by katyk
4. When you come out of your post grad, do you have to do a years probation teaching period or anything before you are recognised as a fully qualified teacher? I seen this was the case with the UK courses, just wondering if its the same here.
You do whats called the dip year, where the dept. inspectors come and watch you teaching for a couple of days during the year and until you do that you arent considered fully fully qualified, but you still get paid the same for that year as far as I know.
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26-05-2006, 10:25   #9
katyk
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Sorry, I just have a couple more questions that hopefully someone can help out with.

1. The grant that you get for studying in the UK, is that a gauranteed grant or can you only get it in certain circumstances?

2. Also can you train in the UK, and when you are finished come straight back to Ireland, or are you required to teach in the UK for a year or something first.


3. In relation to subbing, I was looking through the newspaper lastnight and there were lots of ads for temporary teachers in primary and secondary schools for Sept 06. Some ads specified that you needed to be a fully qualified teacher, but most didnt even mention it. I was wondering if I could apply for those type of jobs, or is the qualification not mentioned because it is normally a given that you have a teaching qualification. Is it normally only subbing for a day here and there that is available to people with no teaching qualification.

Thanks in advance for your help.
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09-06-2006, 18:55   #10
dory
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Hey,

Just wondering about the allowance for having a masters. If it is a totally unrelated masters to your degree and what you plan on teaching, do you still get the allowance? Or is it onlly if the master furthers your knowledge of the subject you are teaching?
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26-09-2006, 17:11   #11
akx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katyk
Hi
.
Also, does anyone know the name of anywhere that I can do the Leaving Cert honours Irish, as I only done pass in school .I seen this is a requirement for primary teaching.
Thanks
I have just started honours Irish classes one day a week the Dargan Centre in Bray it costs 288euro per term.... I also plan to take an intense course in "The Institute" in Dublin before the orals approach.
If you are doing a general degree like myself, and decide to do a 1year intense PGDE in Scotland (Irish citizens can apply for fees to be paid there) you can come back and complete the S.C.G (seperate Irish exam) which means you will not be required to have honours Irish L.C. I think your safest bet is to try the honours Irish route and at least you have the alternitive of the latter.
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26-09-2006, 20:53   #12
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don't know about secondary teaching, but in order to maximise your salary in primary teaching you should aim to have an honours degree, teach in a Gaelscoil, do a Masters and make sure that school is on an island.

All allowances covered
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26-09-2006, 20:58   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dory
Hey,

Just wondering about the allowance for having a masters. If it is a totally unrelated masters to your degree and what you plan on teaching, do you still get the allowance? Or is it onlly if the master furthers your knowledge of the subject you are teaching?
i think you still get the allowance, but you only get the DIFFERENCE between your primary degree allowance (pass/hons allowance) and the Master's allowance - works out at something like 10 euro extra (net) per paycheque.
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26-09-2006, 22:11   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GAA widow
don't know about secondary teaching, but in order to maximise your salary in primary teaching you should aim to have an honours degree, teach in a Gaelscoil, do a Masters and make sure that school is on an island.

All allowances covered
Correction: in order to maximise your salary in primary teaching you should aim to have an honours degree, teach in a Gaelscoil, do a Masters,make sure that school is on an island and be principal of that school!
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27-09-2006, 11:45   #15
TheDriver
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Masters isn't really worth that much extra and don't forget the S&S scheme to really push the boat out!
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