The dawn of television in Ireland - Page 2 - boards.ie
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30-01-2006, 19:48   #16
icdg
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Indeed so, probably one of RTÉ's longest running children's drama series, running 1968-1982. Last seen repeated in a very early morning slot about five years ago.
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30-01-2006, 21:21   #17
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Originally Posted by Ulsterman 1690
Ummm Wanderly Wagon WAS an Irish programme was it not ?
Whoops big mistake meant to say "other than" the ww.
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30-01-2006, 22:06   #18
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Originally Posted by DMC
In contrast, the population, and the amount of people in the labour force was a fraction of what we have today.

Keeping the missus looked indoors certainly didnt help.
Yep, mass unemployment, and single earning families were the order of the day.

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Originally Posted by DMC
A colour telly was.... 10 times the average industrial wage back then? (pure guess?)
Probably not far off, I've no idea what a colour telly actually cost back then, but, I seem to recall my dad buying a telly in about 82, and it cost a few hundred at least, if I recall correctly it was about 500 punts.

Average industrial wage then was about 160 euro (source), or about 125 punts, before tax, which would have been considerably higher than it is now.
You can understand the Gov of the time being concerned about a mass purchasing of Colour tellies, a luxury item back then.
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31-01-2006, 08:47   #19
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Originally Posted by icdg
Indeed so, probably one of RTÉ's longest running children's drama series, running 1968-1982. Last seen repeated in a very early morning slot about five years ago.
Wondered why we never saw it. Moved to Limerick in Jan 1983. Bosco was it. Though I think they especially auditioned for presenters that couldn't sing. My eldest was quite fond of Bosco, but not so much that 20 years later to get the RTE DVD for Christmas.
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01-02-2006, 23:33   #20
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If a set cost £500 in 1982 as Blackjack says, then things didn't really change much in the intervening years. In 1990 or so we got a new television - a standard 21" Nordmende which cost £400! Items like that were so expenvive until the late 1990s. In a way it's a pity they still aren't - now items are so cheap and disposable that it's generally financially worth just checking em

What a lovely set that Nordmende was come to think of it; well built, nice size, attractive square proportions, good design, and best of all glorious 4:3.
Ah, those were the days.............
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16-02-2006, 22:32   #21
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What EM/Radio Frequency ranges were assigned to Ireland? Were we only given a certain range of frequencies to use for all our transmissions be it television, radio or mobile? What is to stop us from just taking the entire range of useable frequencies (ie 30KHz-30+GHz)and [ComReg] dividing them up and assigning them for use. I know this is a little off topic, but I am just curious.

Oh, one other thing, how did CableLink and MMDS come to be in Ireland and why do you need a licence to broadcast on Cable, I mean Cable transmissions are closed circuit and are not openly receivable.
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16-02-2006, 22:55   #22
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All spectrum 10kHz to 1000GHz is agreed by International Treaty.

I suppose if the USA or Russia decided to do their own thing there would be a lot of grumbling and we would have to work around it. ON the occasions Ireland has made desicions contrary to the local rgeion it has created problems of compatibility, supply, interference.

Anyone can subscribe to Cable TV. It is PAY TV, but PUBLIC. If you have a licenced PRIVATE circuit you can put whatever you like, for example Cable TV in Ireland can't show live cam of a Brothel.
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17-02-2006, 17:16   #23
Ulsterman 1690
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Cable transmissions are closed circuit and are not openly receivable.
In theory perhaps but most Cable systems in the Republic have such horrendus levels of signal leakage that to describe them as closed systems is rather laughable

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Oh, one other thing, how did CableLink and MMDS come to be in Ireland
Cablelink (now bought over by NTL) came about as a gradual merger of lots of small CATV and MATV networks
I could sum up in a single word the process of how MMDS came to be in Ireland but Id probably better wait until the relevent tribunals have concluded

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for example Cable TV in Ireland can't show live cam of a Brothel.
Unless of course its during a programme called Oireachtas Report (see comment above)
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18-02-2006, 04:26   #24
rogue-entity
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Originally Posted by watty
All spectrum 10kHz to 1000GHz is agreed by International Treaty.

I suppose if the USA or Russia decided to do their own thing there would be a lot of grumbling and we would have to work around it. ON the occasions Ireland has made desicions contrary to the local rgeion it has created problems of compatibility, supply, interference.

Anyone can subscribe to Cable TV. It is PAY TV, but PUBLIC. If you have a licenced PRIVATE circuit you can put whatever you like, for example Cable TV in Ireland can't show live cam of a Brothel.
So if we have 1KHz-1THz, what is the deal. We are able to use the entire useable frequency range, so there is no problem really. And since the US likly has use of the same frequency range, why would they want to "do something different".

I still do not see the point of needing a "broadcast" licence for cable TV. I mean, the network is public, although also private in that it is not openly accessable by anyone, just subscribers. The signals from the network are not sent through the air so theoreticaly dont interfer with other users of the same frequencies. At least with a sattelite uplink, you are broadcasting through the air and as such would need a broadcast licence for the frequency you are using.
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18-02-2006, 09:48   #25
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The Cable TV operator needs a licence. This is more about getting a near monopoly to string a cable about a city than spectrum.

The providers (channels) need licences on Cable for CONTENT, not spectrum, as the Cable is sold/connected to the public. There are plenty of German and Spanish channels FTA (anyone with Dish and receiver, no subscription) that would not be allowed on Irish Cable / MMDS. Similar content to top shelf in Newsagents to much more explicit.
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18-02-2006, 09:49   #26
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IIRC its actually 9KHz to 256 GHz thats covered by the international radio regulations although national legislation covers everything form zero to 3000 GHz

There are a number of reasons why cable is subject to regulation among them
Cable networks can leak signals and cause interference (especially if they are pure junk like most Irish ones are) and that communication by wire across other peoples property and/or public highways has been regulated since the 19th century. One cant for example run out and start their own telephone company -Its the same for cable TV

BTW am I the only one who reckons this thread has drifted WAY off topic
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18-02-2006, 11:59   #27
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It's the Internet, it's expected
AFASIK only submarines use below 50kHz, and all above 10kHz. Very few receivers have below 100kHz. A tiny few do down to 50kHz.

Some commercial gear exists for 200GHz, and some research at 400GHz. The upper limit would be changed quick enough if anyone figured how to use it

AFASIK currently a roof top Infra Red laser 200Mbps or 2GBps link can be installed licence free. Probabily a loop hole.
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18-02-2006, 12:13   #28
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ummm are rooftop lasers(especially infra-red) only allowed if theyre very low power ?

High power ones baing be dangerous any eyes that get in the way

What "frequency" (wavelength) do the infra red diodes in TV remore controls use ?
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18-02-2006, 12:54   #29
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maybe about 850nm.

A million times higher frequency than 353GHz

It's a fairly wide beam via lenses I think. To avoid blinding birds and make sure a bird only reduces the signal and not block it.

Do not look into the apparatus with the remaining eye.


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Last edited by watty; 18-02-2006 at 13:02.
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20-02-2006, 20:15   #30
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Originally Posted by watty
Growing up in what was then more Prosperous East Antrim, most TVs were rented.

I remember in 1982 a film released on VHS was about £150 sterling. No wonder they were only rented.

I'd guess Colour TV in early 1970s was comparable to price of a small car today. We were not poor. But it was quite a while after Colour Tv arrived that we rented. It was almost fully transistorised. I've repaired one early all valve colour set.

On the Dual standard sets there was a long switch running the length of the set. My repairs to those (moslty B&W) was by ripping out the switch and soldering all the 625 contacts.

I still have a 1980s B&W 12" set for security camera, I got for nothing but the last B&W I watched as a main TV was till January 1983 when I bought new an 8" portable colour set and a portable full size VHS recorder (with option for a separate camera). It had a matching size non-portable TV tuner that plugged into the camera socket. I never had a camera for it.

I did have an ex-industrial Panasonic 1/2" tape reel to reel B&W portable recorder and B&W vidicon camera from 1979 till 1989 when I gave it away with most of my other electonics "hobby" stuff when we left Limerick to live abroad. I'd say emigrated except we came back to Limerick in 1990 or 1991.
My Dad bought a Philips G8 in 1972 for £200 (I think) and a Hirschmann Quad to receive Group A from Cornwall (Westward TV). He was also big into satellite TV from the mid-80s. 1.8m dish I think. I myself bought a Panasonic VHS recorder in 1979 for £870. I think my wages were something like £70 - £80 per week.

Last edited by Freddie59; 20-02-2006 at 20:25.
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