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22-05-2012, 00:06   #1
caesura
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What steps should i take to teach evening classes

Hi guys,

I'm very interested in teaching evening classes in music and media in one of the I.T.'s or CFE's in Dublin. I was told at one CFE recently that any subject can be taught and that there is a set pay given to evening tutors.

I took a similiar course in intro to Music Production some years ago and I'd certainly feel that I could teach a much more comprehensive p/t - evening module than the one I undertook.

So I'm just wondering if anyone could tell me how I would go about this or what I should prepare in advance of contacting the colleges. I'm assuming a qualification isn't always neccessary from what I garnered talking to a porter in my own former college, but either way, I do hold a media production HND and in terms of music, I'm an IMRO member, I've been writing and performing for 20 years and written music for independent shorts even an award winning one etc etc I've also taught english as a foreign language in an academy abroad so I'd be proficient and qualified for what I'm thinking of offering.

But how to go about it? I know the obvious step is to contact the colleges directly but I'd just like to know the lay of the land a little (and know who I should be asking to speak to for example) before blundering in head first and under prepared.

Anyway I'd really appreciate it if any of you with experience of this could give me a little direction.

Thanks!
C ;-)
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22-05-2012, 15:29   #2
Tom Dunne
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I've taught at a number of ITs, plus a CFE. So I can relay my experiences.

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I'm assuming a qualification isn't always neccessary from what I garnered talking to a porter in my own former college
No offense intended, but I am not so sure that is the right person to be getting such information from.

To teach at an IT, you need a Bachelors degree and three years post-grad experience at a minimum. Other institutions would usually have their requirements in the jobs adverts.

Given your vast experience in the industry, this may stand to you. However, in a lot of colleges, you could potentially face the junior HR person scanning CVs for requirements such as the above and throwing away applications that do not meet them.

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But how to go about it? I know the obvious step is to contact the colleges directly but I'd just like to know the lay of the land a little (and know who I should be asking to speak to for example) before blundering in head first and under prepared.
Some jobs I have gotten through contacts, some simply through ads in the newspapers. This is the time of year to be scouring the Independent on a Thursday and the Times on a Friday. Also make sure to check in August and early September when they are putting together the evening course schedules.

I do not think you should simply ring up and expect to be put through to a HR person. I think the best bet would be to use any contacts you may have in the industry. Also, make sure and check out colleges that offer the subjects in the areas you specialise. As far as I recall, Ballyfermot does a lot of subjects in that area, as does Maynooth University.
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23-05-2012, 02:20   #3
caesura
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Hi Tom, thanks for your reply I appreciate you taking the time here!

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To teach at an IT, you need a Bachelors degree and three years post-grad experience at a minimum. Other institutions would usually have their requirements in the jobs adverts.
Do you think that would be for every course in an IT? So far as I know the guy teaching the 10 wk course i undertook a few years back had just worked in the industry; an ex-girlfriend of mine also did a crafts course (pottery etc) in the evenings and I'm pretty sure her tutor just had life experience in arts/crafts though both of these were CFEs I'm happy enough to stick to CFE's if IT's aren't an option.

I'd be thinking of doing similar 'introduction/hobby' type courses rather than anything intensive or academically orientated. Something I've come up with the outline (course description) and module for myself.

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Some jobs I have gotten through contacts, some simply through ads in the newspapers. This is the time of year to be scouring the Independent on a Thursday and the Times on a Friday. Also make sure to check in August and early September when they are putting together the evening course schedules.
Cheers for that i'll start checking both from this Thur/Friday

One other thing I was wondering is - should I be negotiating rates with colleges or is there a set rate for all evening tutors?

Thanks again,
C.
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23-05-2012, 21:18   #4
StillWaters
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Most tutors on hobby evening classes do not have a degree in their subject, just an in-depth knowledge.

Contact the Evening Class co-ordinator in your local school/college that runs evening classes. Pitch your class to them.
They will advertise it in their brochure for September, and if it fills, you start work - simples. Pay is around €40 p.h.

Bear in mind though most courses do not fill and do not go ahead. They have been hit hard by the recession.
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24-05-2012, 03:40   #5
Tom Dunne
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Do you think that would be for every course in an IT?
I would imagine so.

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So far as I know the guy teaching the 10 wk course i undertook a few years back had just worked in the industry; an ex-girlfriend of mine also did a crafts course (pottery etc) in the evenings and I'm pretty sure her tutor just had life experience in arts/crafts though both of these were CFEs I'm happy enough to stick to CFE's if IT's aren't an option.

I'd be thinking of doing similar 'introduction/hobby' type courses rather than anything intensive or academically orientated. Something I've come up with the outline (course description) and module for myself.
Yes, I think the 10-week type courses are in a different league to courses in the ITs, so not having a degree wouldn't be a problem.

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One other thing I was wondering is - should I be negotiating rates with colleges or is there a set rate for all evening tutors?
I know for certain in ITs the rates are fixed, not so sure in other colleges.
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27-05-2012, 03:20   #6
caesura
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StillWaters View Post
Most tutors on hobby evening classes do not have a degree in their subject, just an in-depth knowledge.

Contact the Evening Class co-ordinator in your local school/college that runs evening classes. Pitch your class to them.
They will advertise it in their brochure for September, and if it fills, you start work - simples. Pay is around €40 p.h.

Bear in mind though most courses do not fill and do not go ahead. They have been hit hard by the recession.
Thanks StillWaters I'll do up a presentation for them and contact a few CFE's next week.

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I would imagine so.



Yes, I think the 10-week type courses are in a different league to courses in the ITs, so not having a degree wouldn't be a problem.



I know for certain in ITs the rates are fixed, not so sure in other colleges.
That's great Tom, fits in with what StillWater mentioned, cheers.

Thanks a million guys, gonna see if they're running any courses during the summer as well...could be too late for that but might as well see what they say!
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27-05-2012, 17:00   #7
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O.P while you may have the knowledge, teaching it some else is a different ballgame. I would recommend you do a train the trainer course, this is a FETAC level 6 qualification (only 4 days long) and is very worthwhile doing for anyone considering being a trainer/ instructor - it will teach you how to do how to plan your lessons etc.

Having such a qualification yourself would also add credibility to any application you make.
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28-05-2012, 04:03   #8
caesura
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O.P while you may have the knowledge, teaching it some else is a different ballgame. I would recommend you do a train the trainer course, this is a FETAC level 6 qualification (only 4 days long) and is very worthwhile doing for anyone considering being a trainer/ instructor - it will teach you how to do how to plan your lessons etc.

Having such a qualification yourself would also add credibility to any application you make.
Thanks Birdsong, I'm actually experienced at teaching (as mentioned above) from back in my EFL days where I worked monday to friday 8 hrs a day in an Academy in Spain and for the most part I organised all of my own lesson plans.

But that train the trainer cert sounds well worth looking into if it's only 4 days long (though when would depend on the costs) as an accreditation could only be of benefit so thanks for that!
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