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07-08-2012, 12:43   #1
dyer
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Psychotherapy and workshops

Hi,

Was just wondering if anyone could answer this question for me! I've been studying psychotherapy over the last 2yrs (well, finished first year of my degree after the foundation to be more precise). Having made quite a few friends on the foundation who since went to study elsewhere I had a run in with one or two recently and we were discussing various semantics of the courses etc.. anyhow, I just brought up the point of workshops because on my course, we're only offered workshops that have been setup and run by the college internally, which we have to pre-book beforehand, seemingly on their courses, things are a bit different.

I wasn't able to attend one of said workshops this year due to other arrangements that were unavoidable at the time.. offered to take another workshop outside of college, but was instead told that they'd speak to me about it at my progression meeting at the end of the semester...when this point was eventually brought up, they said i would have to do the workshop next year??

I'm wondering is there any formal legislation regarding which ones you can choose or is that left to the discretion of the institution? or any particular information about how that is/was done throughout your own studies? It seems to be a grey area in my college and they haven't been very helpful answering my questions. My colleagues seem to have much more freedom regarding which workshops they can choose. It's not a big deal per se, but it is where the content of said workshops are concerned, I would rather spend my money on the subjects that do concern my personal development rather than being forced to pick things that don't really interest me, so in that respect, it matters to me at least.

sorry for the long post.. too much coffee and sunshine this morning
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07-08-2012, 13:02   #2
Odysseus
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If these work shop are not part of your course, then it is up to you what you attend. If they are not part of the offical course and the college is putting pressure on you to attend then that is wrong and IMO it is a rip off. However, the way I see students being treated I not suprised. However, even if I'm correct, you may find that in order to get through you will have to attend. If that occurs it is just wrong.

Could you expand on your post a bit more without identifying yourself or the college?
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07-08-2012, 14:31   #3
dyer
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Thanks for your reply Odysseus.

The workshops themselves are compulsory but don't really carry any academic merit, we simply receive a certificate of attendance and yes, as it stands I will have to attend an extra one in order to satisfy course requirements to gain formal entry into the next year. Personally, I have no real problem attending workshops and exploring other avenues of interest relating to the course, but what I didn't know was that other colleges gave much more freedom of choice in that regard, which was news to me. I am given a list of which to choose from for the coming year, which limits my choices (and interests) greatly, not to mention the fact that I have the added cost of travel, accommodation and to pay the set prices that I'm given.
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07-08-2012, 14:51   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dyer View Post
Thanks for your reply Odysseus.

The workshops themselves are compulsory but don't really carry any academic merit, we simply receive a certificate of attendance and yes, as it stands I will have to attend an extra one in order to satisfy course requirements to gain formal entry into the next year. Personally, I have no real problem attending workshops and exploring other avenues of interest relating to the course, but what I didn't know was that other colleges gave much more freedom of choice in that regard, which was news to me. I am given a list of which to choose from for the coming year, which limits my choices (and interests) greatly, not to mention the fact that I have the added cost of travel, accommodation and to pay the set prices that I'm given.
If they are not part of the course and they are not compulsory why would you have too attend it? How can it be the above; yet you need to attend to satisfy the course requirements? I would be putting that to them, but I can understand as a newish student why you would not.

I still do a bit of teaching and there is no way I would work with that, I have walked from courses before as I felt the students where not being looked after. I just would not want my name associated with it.

All I can say based on the above is the day you get your degree and anything else you need, walk away and never return. At least where I grew up people put a gun to your head when they robbed you.

Anyway welcome to the psych forum, I hope we can be of help and of course you can help others as you continue your studies.

Anyone else got any thoughts on this?
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07-08-2012, 14:52   #5
Enhtie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dyer View Post
Thanks for your reply Odysseus.

The workshops themselves are compulsory but don't really carry any academic merit, we simply receive a certificate of attendance and yes, as it stands I will have to attend an extra one in order to satisfy course requirements to gain formal entry into the next year. Personally, I have no real problem attending workshops and exploring other avenues of interest relating to the course, but what I didn't know was that other colleges gave much more freedom of choice in that regard, which was news to me. I am given a list of which to choose from for the coming year, which limits my choices (and interests) greatly, not to mention the fact that I have the added cost of travel, accommodation and to pay the set prices that I'm given.
Did your institution specify in their promotional brochure and advertising that these additional workshops had to be workshops delivered by them?
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07-08-2012, 16:09   #6
dyer
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@Odysseus.. they seem to fall under the umbrella of 'mandatory associated programme activities'.

@Enhtie.. Nope that was neither mentioned nor stipulated anywhere, unless you take the above
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07-08-2012, 18:13   #7
Odysseus
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@Odysseus.. they seem to fall under the umbrella of 'mandatory associated programme activities'.

@Enhtie.. Nope that was neither mentioned nor stipulated anywhere, unless you take the above
That's just not right, you should be free to seek learning where you want. The is nothing wrong with running extra workshops, but forcing people to attend
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08-08-2012, 10:23   #8
Kooli
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If these are mandatory courses, then why are we saying they are not part of the course? It sounds like they are to me!
Unless I'm missing something here...
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08-08-2012, 17:30   #9
Enhtie
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Kooli, point well made. I believe it is very important to question, question, question.
"Why is there a requirement for extra one day workshops?"
"Who is the beneficiary of these workshops?"
" Is it for the personal development of the student?" If so, then
"Why is the choice limited?"
" If the college limits the area of choices, perhaps they are inadvertently limiting the personal growth of the student?"
"Is the purpose of studying counselling and psychotherapy to encourage empowerment and self awareness?" If so,
"how does the college deciding which workshops are open to you support this outcome?"
"If these are mandatory courses, then why are they not part of the syllabus?"
I would agree with Kooli that if they are mandatory and have to be undertaken in the college it might be less confusing for students if the workshops were included on the syllabus and the course was €400 more expensive.
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