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08-11-2011, 11:38   #1
dochara
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Twin-coil central-heating diagram

I need a diagram for connecting/fitting a twin-coil cylinder to connect with a solid-fuel stove, boiler and radiators.

No luck in Google - can anyone help? Thanks.
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12-06-2012, 19:22   #2
ste15
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I am looking for the same, I know I have to run 1'' pipe from stove to twin coil cylinder and back again with its own water feed and expansion, but what I cannot work out is how to connect both systems together so I can heat my rads. Is it connect flow to flow and return to return with a non return valve on both and what size pipe should I connect with? Gas central heating is 3/4'' from boiler to cylinder.
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12-06-2012, 20:41   #3
aujopimur
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Idealy you have 4 connections on the solid fuel appliance, 2 for gravity to the cylinder, the other 2 are linked to the oil/gas boiler with pump safety NR valves etc..
These dual systems can be difficult to get working correctly.
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12-06-2012, 22:54   #4
shane0007
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http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showt...6645673&page=4
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12-06-2012, 23:58   #5
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if you need a diagram to show you how to do this you really shouldnt be doing it.
if installed incorrectly your back boiler will be a potential bomb
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12-06-2012, 23:59   #6
DoneDL
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There is plenty of advice on google as regards layout of systems but solid fuel is not an option for guesswork. My best advice would be get a recommended plumber in and ask for advice.
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13-06-2012, 00:00   #7
mark_18tp
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by the way that document linked is showing an incorrect way. you would need an injector tee on a two pipe back boiler link up.
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13-06-2012, 08:19   #8
shane0007
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Originally Posted by mark_18tp View Post
by the way that document linked is showing an incorrect way. you would need an injector tee on a two pipe back boiler link up.
You will need to expand a bit more on how the diagram is incorrect.

There is nothing wrong with it. Admittedly, having an injector tee will inprove the gravity circulation both when the pump is off and when it is on, but ultimately there is nothing wrong with the design and it works perfectly as intended.
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13-06-2012, 09:09   #9
freddyuk
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You should also point out that the F&E tank should be fibreglass and the float valve should be copper ball. Plastic will melt if it all goes wrong.
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13-06-2012, 09:16   #10
shane0007
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You should also point out that the F&E tank should be fibreglass and the float valve should be copper ball. Plastic will melt if it all goes wrong.
It is a diagram not an technical instruction manual. It is intended for the use and interpretation of suitably competent and trained professionals. You will also notice that I did not quote the EN standards for the type of copper and fittings used nor the grade of copper for the cylinder. The dimensions of the internal coils are also not quoted.....
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13-06-2012, 20:00   #11
freddyuk
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It is a diagram not an technical instruction manual. It is intended for the use and interpretation of suitably competent and trained professionals. You will also notice that I did not quote the EN standards for the type of copper and fittings used nor the grade of copper for the cylinder. The dimensions of the internal coils are also not quoted.....
With respect you are a trained plumber and the OP was asking about how to.... and you offered a diagram. So in fact you appeared to be condoning the OP trying this for himself without pointing a couple of very basic safety issues. The post you referred to does not mention this either AFAIK.
The thermal performance of the system was not something I was addressing but kids have died from having boiling water pumping over into plastic cisterns and coming through their bedroom ceiling so I thought it was worth mentioning. Some thermoplastic tanks are rated to contain 100c but they are more expensive and not fitted as standard.
Overflow should be heatproofed also.
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13-06-2012, 20:37   #12
Micky Dolenz
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A bit basic but some good info none the less.

http://www.boilerstoves.co.uk/installation-types.html
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13-06-2012, 22:19   #13
shane0007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freddyuk View Post
With respect you are a trained plumber and the OP was asking about how to.... and you offered a diagram. So in fact you appeared to be condoning the OP trying this for himself without pointing a couple of very basic safety issues. The post you referred to does not mention this either AFAIK.
The thermal performance of the system was not something I was addressing but kids have died from having boiling water pumping over into plastic cisterns and coming through their bedroom ceiling so I thought it was worth mentioning. Some thermoplastic tanks are rated to contain 100c but they are more expensive and not fitted as standard.
Overflow should be heatproofed also.
People shouldn't spit on the street but they still do, so my point is people should not install solid fuel systems unless they are suitably trained or experienced however, they still will. I would rather them follow an installation diagram that will be at the very least a safe installation rather then them picking what they can from the internet and doing it rather blind. If they do not want the back boiler to end up sitting on their lap, then they should use an experienced installer. If they want to have a go themselves, they probably will do in any case.

Secondly, the incident you refer was an extremely isolated case in the UK a number of years ago. I have yet to see a fibre glass f & e tank installed neither in Ireland or the UK. Following that incident it was recommended that metallic overflow trays are placed underneath the f & e tank that is piped externally via its own overflow pipe.
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09-06-2013, 22:08   #14
David241173
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Shane 0007 your not a plumber only reading from books leave it to people who know
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09-06-2013, 22:18   #15
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Shane 0007 your not a plumber only reading from books leave it to people who know
Your nearly right there Dave, Shane is a plumber who can read from books which is always a good combination, it's the ones who don't read that cause the problems.
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