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14-02-2012, 09:42   #466
spurious
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iliketwixbars View Post
But going by the marking schemes, it looks like you only get marks for very specific things, i.e. no marks are awarded for things that don't have real historical significance.

Could you give an example of say what does get marks and what doesn't?

For example, say if I was writing an answer to "A Factory Worker in Industrial Britain" and I wrote about this workers living conditions at home, would I get marks for that?
Yes you would, unless it specified in the question that you were to write about the worker's working conditions.

If, on the other hand, you veered off into a tale of how the factory owner made his fortune, then you wouldn't.

e.g.
My name is Tom, last year I moved from the country to the town as we were not needed to work the harvest becasue of the new machines.

(1 SRS - underlined) - This would get marks.

My name is Tom, my wife is Mary, I work in a factory. We have four kids and life is very hard.

This would not get any marks as it is.
It is too waffly.
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14-02-2012, 09:46   #467
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Originally Posted by xfabgalx View Post
The guideline is to write between a page and a page and a half. This is a page exactly.
Guideline or not, it is marked according to the SRSs in it.
Only 8 SRSs are needed for a full mark answer.

I have seen answers 12 lines long that got full marks.
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14-02-2012, 12:02   #468
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IceCreamGirl View Post
People in History

Leonardo da Vinci. handsome fella
Hey IceCreamGirl 




It was called the March on Rome.

Indeed!
Plus, does anyone need notes for English? - such as poems i.e. William Wordsworth or drama - I also have a good collection of sample answers in Irish.

Last edited by xfabgalx; 14-02-2012 at 13:02.
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14-02-2012, 15:30   #469
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamez735 View Post
Thanks for the religion, any more?
Religious Morality

  • Morality: The basis on which a person makes moral choices, i.e. between right and wrong, good and bad
  • Moral person: A person who knows the difference between right and wrong and chooses right
  • Immoral person: Someone who knows the difference between right and wrong and does wrong

Choice=Action=Consequences -> negative and positive -> affects relationships
  • Influence: something that affects a person's behaviour/decisions
  • Society: connection that exists between people when they share an outlook and way of life
  • (Lots about influences in other post i.e. family, friends/peers, religion, state, school).
Moral Vision
  • A moral vision is based on the common good
  • A religious moral vision (RMV) is based on religious beliefs
  • Religious faith underlies the laws and moral code of faith community
  • Having a RMV is about knowing and doing what God wants
Religious Moral Vision: this is awareness of what is right and wrong, as revealed by the sacred texts or founder of a community of faith

Moral Vision of Christianity
  • God made us with the freedom to choose between good and bad
  • At the heart of Christian morality is love: Jesus said -> 'Love one another as I have loved you'.
  • Christian moral vision involves forgiveness
  • RMV should be guided by sacred scripture (10 Commandments)
A moral code is based on a moral vision

The 10 Commandments
  • The basis of the moral code that Jesus grew up with
  • They gave guidance in how people should live in a right relationship with each other and with God
Examples:
  • You shall not steal
  • You shall not kill
  • You shall not take the name of the lord your God in vain
  • I am the Lord your God: You shall not have strange gods before me
  • etc.

Stages of Moral Growth

1.Moral Immaturity
  • We are very young and only do the right thing if we benefit from it
  • Self-centred and selfish
  • Decisions are not based on what is right or wrong

2.Moral Steps
  • Decisions are made to avoid punishment or out of fear of punishment

3.Moral Sheep
  • We need peer approval and decisions are based on wanting to be liked by others
  • We become aware of the positive and negative consequences of our actions
  • Most Teenagers

4.Moral Society
  • Influenced by society and promoting behaviour for the common good of all
5.Moral Maturity
  • When a person upholds the values of justice, peace, respect, truth, love and forgiveness
  • People at this stage have an informed moral vision which guides their decisions
  • Conscience: the ability to judge the best thing to do when free to choose

Decision-Making
  • Morally mature people use the D.E.C.I.D.E. process;
  • D-> Define the facts and info
  • E-> Listen to the voice of experience
  • C-> List all possible consequences
  • I-> Listen to your inner self (conscience, faith, etc)
  • D-> Decide the best possible outcome and go through with action
  • E-> Evaluate and reflect on your decision and learn from experience!

Euthanasia as a conflict between the State and Religion
  • Euthanasia means good death. It refers to the practice of ending a life in a painless manner.
  • Can be accomplished in an Oral, intravenous (known as IV), or intramuscular administration of drugs.
  • assisted-suicide is the process by which an individual who is incapable is provided with the means to die from suicide.
  • Euthanasia includes acts which are performed by people other than the patient

Arguments for:
  • autonomy: every person has the right to make personal and private decisions about their own lives
  • Euthanasia: allows patients to die with dignity
  • Utility: allows greatest good for the greatest number of people because:
  • the patients suffering is removed
  • family can grieve properly
  • medical staff can avoid grief and stress
  • very high costs of terminal care for patient are removed
  • quality over quantity: human life is sacred and it should not be degraded by reducing the quality of life for extending quantity of life.

Arguments against:
  • Euthanasia wouldn't be only for people who are terminally ill
  • it will become a means of health care cost containment
  • it will become non-voluntary
  • it is a rejection of the importance and value of human life
  • -The Church says...
  • the Christian teaching condemns euthanasia as a "crime against life". The teaching of the Christian Church on euthanasia rests on several core principles including the sanctity of human life, the dignity of the human person.
  • -The State says...
  • euthanasia is illegal in Ireland: this shows the Church's power over law

Social Justice
  • Justice: fairness and respect which leads to good relationships
-right relationships with other people no matter who they are
-to be denied one's human rights is to be denied justice
  • We live in an unjust world
  • Our world is divided by enormous wealth on the one hand and great poverty on the other

Why would a Christian work for justice?
  • Christians believe that it is their religious duty to work for social justice. They would work for social justice to live as Jesus wanted
  • This means helping to eradicate poverty and the unfair distribution of global wealth
  • Justice is at the heart of Jesus' message, "Love God with all your heart ... and love your neighbours as yourself."
  • When faced with the moral issue of social justice, Christians should ask themselves, "if I do this will I be showing that I love God/my neighbour?"
Exam question:
Describe the work for justice being done by members of a world religion.
  • Who works for justice?
Trocaire in Christianity
  • It is a church organisation part of the Catholic Church
  • Works for justice and peace in the world and it wants to make everyone aware of poverty
  • It was set up in 1973
  • Trocaire = Compassion
  • Their Inspiring Vision: It is inspired by Scripture and Gospel values
  • Its vision for the future is for:
  • a just world - equality
  • people's dignity to be protected
  • human rights to be respected

Sin and forgiveness
  • sin: an offence against God. Turning away from a relationship with God and others
  • judgement: a decision about someone or something, usually arrived after careful consideration
  • forgiveness: the act of pardoning, excusing or making allowances for an offence

The Sacrament of Reconciliation
  • offers the possibility of restoring broken relationships

4 elements
  • Contrition - must be very sorry for sinning
  • Confession - must confess their sins
  • Absolution - receives forgiveness
  • Satisfaction - priest gives person an act of penance

Parable of the Lost Sheep
What does this parable reveal about sin and forgiveness?
The meaning of this parable is that if one person loses their faith in God (sins), He will always watch over you and when you regain your faith (confess sins), He will welcome you back.
  • God = shepherd
  • 99 sheep = non-sinners
  • Lost sheep = sinner
Glencree Centre for Reconciliation
  • The Ecumenical Movement - purely Christian movement to promote unity between all Christian Churches.

Stewardship and morality
  • State Law and Morality
  • Pluralism: a state of society where the views of people of all traditions are tolerated
  • Religious fundamentalism: literal take on scriptures and teachings. Rejects attempts to update or modernise the way in which Community belief is expressed


That's all I've got
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14-02-2012, 16:38   #470
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xfabgalx View Post
Hey IceCreamGirl 




It was called the March on Rome.

Indeed!
Plus, does anyone need notes for English? - such as poems i.e. William Wordsworth or drama - I also have a good collection of sample answers in Irish.
thanks fabgirl
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14-02-2012, 18:03   #471
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The 1798 Rebellion.

Who was Wolfe Tone?



  • Theobald Wolfe Tone became one of the main organisers of the 1798 rebellion
  • Protestant - not a member of Protestant Ascendancy
  • Became a barrister
  • saw how unfair political system was in Ireland
  • Heavily influenced by French revolution:
  • French people removed their king from power
  • Replaced king with a democratically elected assembly
  • Wrote to a group of Belfast Presbyterians who were looking to change political system also
  • Asked for help in getting rid of Penal laws, refused
  • Wrote pamphlet saying why Presbyterians and non-ascendancy Protestants should help Catholics
  • He was to become a member of the Catholic Committee

Who were the United Irishmen?
  • Belfast Presbyterians impressed with Tone's pamphlet
  • Formed Society of United Irishmen to:
1) Encourage all Irish people to ask for political change
2) Reduce British power in Ireland
3) Achieve its aims peacefully.
  • The British outlawed the United Irishmen when heard reports if Tone speaking with French spy.
  • Forced to leave Ireland for America
  • United Irishmen became secret society, determined to gain independence by any means necessary
Why did Tone go to France?
  • Tone knew they would need outside help to fight against British
  • Went to France to ask for an army
  • Given 43 ships and 15000 soldiers under command of General Lazare Hoche
  • Arrived at Bantry Bay, Co Cork in December 1796
  • Unable to land bad weather
  • Expedition called off and returned

How did the British react?
  • Shocked at almost-invasion
  • Treated Irish cruelly:
  • Pitch-capping
  • Half-hanging
  • Anyone suspected of being a rebel was arrested and tortured
  • Spies gained intelligence of United Irishmen - reported activities
  • One was Thomas Reynolds, Tone's brother-in-law


What took place during the rebellion in Leinster?

Many of the leaders of the United Irishmen were arrested because of spies
Rebellion in Leinster continued despite this
However, they were defeated easily - many executed

How did the rebellion in Wexford progress?
  • Rebels in Wexford enjoyed initial victories at Oulart Hill and Wexford Town
  • Outnumbered British
  • Divided forces in two
  • One to New Ross
  • One to Dublin
  • Defeated
  • Over 100 Protestants, including women and children. burned to death at barn at Scullabogue by rebels
  • British burned rebels field hospital at Vinegar Hill in revenge
  • Rebel leaders such as Fr John Murphy and Bagenal Harvey were executed



What happened in the rebellion in Ulster?
  • Many Presbyterian United Irishmen refused to take part in the rebellion after hearing about Scullabogue
  • Henry Joy McCracken had rebels with victories of Randalstown and Ballymena.
  • Defeated at Antrim town
  • McCracken was executed

Henry Joy McCracken:

  • Henry Munro led rebels in Down to victory at Saintfield
  • defeated at Ballinahinch
  • Munro executed but men allowed to go free

What help did the French give in 1798?
  • Tone secured French help in August, just over 1000 soldiers
  • landed at Killala co. Mayo
  • Gained initial victory at Ballinamuck
  • Irish rebels executed while French returned safely

What happened to Wolfe Tone?
  • Captured off coast of Lough Swilly co Donegal with army of 3000 French soldiers
  • French allowed to go free, Tone imprisoned in Dublin
  • Sentenced to hanging but wanted to be shot like a soldier
  • Denied this, Tone cut his throat and died a week later
Who was Robert Emmett?
  • Led a rebellion in Dublin in 1803, executed

Results if 1798 Rebellion
  1. Over 50000 rebels died in fighting
  2. In 1800 the Act of Union abolished Irish Parliament. All laws and taxes on Ireland were made at Westminster
  3. Future Irish rebels would be influenced by the ideas of Wolfe Tone (1848, 1916, 1918-20)
  4. Other Irishmen used Parliament to try to improve the Irish situation (Daniel O'Connell, Charles Stewart Parnell)
  5. The 1798 rebellion ended any hope of Protestants and Catholics for Irish independence. Protestants wished to remain united with Britain (Unionists)


None of the images used are mine.

Last edited by xfabgalx; 14-02-2012 at 18:05.
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14-02-2012, 21:13   #472
Bazinga_N
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xfabgalx View Post
Hey IceCreamGirl 
Plus, does anyone need notes for English? - such as poems i.e. William Wordsworth or drama - I also have a good collection of sample answers in Irish.
What notes do you have from English?
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14-02-2012, 23:59   #473
IceCreamGirl
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Can i please have notes on
-packaging and convenience foods
- coeliac disease
-classification of protein and pastry
-design a base ball out fit
-heart, conory, heart disease, etc
-heat transfer
-buying in goods
-ovens
-guidelines for looking after electricity in the home
-credit
-convenience food
-addictive foods
-use of colours in the home

please? <3
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15-02-2012, 15:13   #474
xfabgalx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IceCreamGirl View Post
Can i please have notes on
-packaging and convenience foods
- coeliac disease
-classification of protein and pastry
-design a base ball out fit
-heart, conory, heart disease, etc
-heat transfer
-buying in goods
-ovens
-guidelines for looking after electricity in the home
-credit
-convenience food
-addictive foods
-use of colours in the home

please? <3
I have loads of them notes
Im guessing you don't have your book?

Will put up those notes soon as well.

English: Notes on Daffodils by Wordsworth, I already put up Dulce.
Romeo and Juliet: relationship, fight scenes
media studies
functional writing
all that kind of thing
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15-02-2012, 20:52   #475
IceCreamGirl
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xfabgalx View Post
I have loads of them notes
Im guessing you don't have your book?

Will put up those notes soon as well.

English: Notes on Daffodils by Wordsworth, I already put up Dulce.
Romeo and Juliet: relationship, fight scenes
media studies
functional writing
all that kind of thing
oh my god. you're a LIFE SAVER.
sorry but can you put the Home Ec. notes up as soon as possible please cause it's the first paper on this coming monday
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15-02-2012, 22:40   #476
xfabgalx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IceCreamGirl View Post
oh my god. you're a LIFE SAVER.
sorry but can you put the Home Ec. notes up as soon as possible please cause it's the first paper on this coming monday


Yep will do soon will edit this post
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16-02-2012, 21:17   #477
IceCreamGirl
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Business
does anyone have study notes on..
-The Accounts
-Business Documents
-how to process a receipt and credit note
-business finance and banks
-CV's and employment
-delivery systems
-finance
-banking
- (writing a report) difference between private limited company and sole trader under these topics ''liabilities'' ''profit'' and one other
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16-03-2012, 16:27   #478
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People in history - A person living in Southern Ireland during the emergency (2009)
anyone have this? Not in my (really bad) history book.
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16-03-2012, 21:02   #479
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Important Romeo and Juliet quotes?

Last edited by spurious; 17-03-2012 at 07:52. Reason: unnecessary formatting removed
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17-03-2012, 19:36   #480
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Originally Posted by 0000879k View Post
Important Romeo and Juliet quotes?
Learn about 10 quotes per character if you want to be prepared - and from dramatic scenes. For example;

"O happy dagger! this is thy sheath; there rust, and let me die." - Juliet says this when she sees Romeo dead. She is quick to act when she sees the dagger. Admired because of courage. Willing to endure the pain.


Mostly learn the quotes that seem to stick out to you. Another example:

"I'll look to like, if looking liking move" - Juliet is obedient to her mother. She does not promise to marry Paris but agrees to try to get to know him for love.
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