Boards.ie uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Click here to find out more x
Post Reply  
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
18-11-2008, 16:36   #1
newbie2
Registered User
 
newbie2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: One off the money
Posts: 2,148
Whats the difference between Baking Soda/Bicarbonate Soda/Baking Powder?

Whats the difference between Baking Soda/Bicarbonate Soda/Baking Powder?

The wife has a few recipes off the interweb and a lot of them refer to Baking Soda - which I couldn't find in Superquinn. Is it an American term or am I an idiot for not knowing this basic question?

Thanks
newbie2 is offline  
Advertisement
18-11-2008, 16:44   #2
Alun
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Bray, Co. Wicklow
Posts: 13,098
Baking Soda and Bicarbonate of Soda are the same thing, Sodium Bicarbonate or NaHCO3. Baking Powder is Baking Soda plus other ingredients (acid salts) that, when mixed with water, react with the Baking Soda to make CO2 that acts as rising agent.
Alun is online now  
19-11-2008, 08:23   #3
muckety
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 638
Good question (and answer) - I understand that Baking powder acts as a raising agent, does Bicarb of Soda do the same or what is the purpose of it in recipies?
muckety is offline  
19-11-2008, 09:03   #4
Alun
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Bray, Co. Wicklow
Posts: 13,098
Quote:
Originally Posted by muckety View Post
Good question (and answer) - I understand that Baking powder acts as a raising agent, does Bicarb of Soda do the same or what is the purpose of it in recipies?
Basically, plain bicarbonate of soda reacts with other weakly acid ingredients in the recipe, such as buttermilk in scone and soda bread recipes, to do the same thing, i.e. act as a raising agent.

You also see recipes for things like soda bread or scones that specify using baking powder instead of bicarb, or that specify a mix of bicarb and cream of tartar, which is one of the ingredients of commercial baking powder. I don't know the reasons for using the one over the other, I'm afraid, maybe it's just a belts and braces approach in case the buttermilk or whatever isn't acidic enough to cause enough rising.
Alun is online now  
20-11-2008, 12:38   #5
the beer revolu
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Cork
Posts: 5,243
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alun View Post
Basically, plain bicarbonate of soda reacts with other weakly acid ingredients in the recipe, such as buttermilk in scone and soda bread recipes, to do the same thing, i.e. act as a raising agent.

You also see recipes for things like soda bread or scones that specify using baking powder instead of bicarb, or that specify a mix of bicarb and cream of tartar, which is one of the ingredients of commercial baking powder. I don't know the reasons for using the one over the other, I'm afraid, maybe it's just a belts and braces approach in case the buttermilk or whatever isn't acidic enough to cause enough rising.
You're spot on there.
Was in DIT bakery school the other day.
For soda bread, they use bicarbonate of soda (bread soda) mixed with cream of tartar. The reasoning being that the butter milk hasn't enough acid to react with and use up the bread soda. Without the cream of tartar, the bread tastes and smells of bread soda. The cream of tartar adds acid to the mix hence using up the bread soda fully and rising the bread.

It's a fantastic school where they teach artisan bakery (without nasty additives) rather than industrial bakery.
Maybe in the future, we'll have more bakers making decent bread!!
the beer revolu is offline  
Advertisement
20-11-2008, 17:31   #6
Possum66
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Bray, Co. Wicklow
Posts: 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alun View Post
or that specify a mix of bicarb and cream of tartar, which is one of the ingredients of commercial baking powder. I don't know the reasons for using the one over the other,
My experience is, that if you make the scones with baking powder, you have to use a lot, and it has a nasty aftertaste. So for scones a mix of bread soda and cream of tartar is the best.
Possum66 is offline  
20-11-2008, 22:53   #7
Magic Monkey
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 1,063
You can also switch to using aluminum-free baking powder to prevent the bad aftertaste when you use a lot
Magic Monkey is offline  
11-12-2008, 11:40   #8
rubadub
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Outside the box
Posts: 22,139
Could you just use baking soda and lemon juice as the acid? I would not mind lemony scones.
rubadub is offline  
04-01-2009, 20:08   #9
europhile
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Possum66 View Post
My experience is, that if you make the scones with baking powder, you have to use a lot, and it has a nasty aftertaste. So for scones a mix of bread soda and cream of tartar is the best.
I thought you mixed cream of tartar with bread soda and the end product was baking powder.
europhile is offline  
Thanks from:
Post Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Remove Text Formatting
Bold
Italic
Underline

Insert Image
Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text
 
Decrease Size
Increase Size
Please sign up or log in to join the discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Share Tweet