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PC World - returning a PC

02.08.2010 14:36 #1
Registered User
Hi,

A good friend of mine went to a PC World in Dublin yesterday looking for a PC for gaming. He found a PC in the gaming section which he bought (a HP desktop). He brought it home and checked a few games on it, only to find out that the performance is apalling; it turned out that the graphics card is very old (released on the market in 2006, we checked the GPU details on the internet). So he came back to the store today, trying to return the PC and exchange it for a cheaper model (where he could buy a separate graphics card on his own).

The problem is that the store has refused to accept his return based on the fact that he has opened the box.

Now, is that legal? What's the story with the 14 day refund / EU policies etc? I don't buy the store's explanation, how can you find out if a PC is performing as expected without opening the box? Not to mention that it's a joke to put a PC with nVidia 6150se in the Gaming section of a store in 2010...
02.08.2010 18:59 #2
Registered User
Originally posted by Winger_PL
Hi,

A good friend of mine went to a PC World in Dublin yesterday looking for a PC for gaming. He found a PC in the gaming section which he bought (a HP desktop). He brought it home and checked a few games on it, only to find out that the performance is apalling; it turned out that the graphics card is very old (released on the market in 2006, we checked the GPU details on the internet). So he came back to the store today, trying to return the PC and exchange it for a cheaper model (where he could buy a separate graphics card on his own).

The problem is that the store has refused to accept his return based on the fact that he has opened the box.

Now, is that legal? What's the story with the 14 day refund / EU policies etc? I don't buy the store's explanation, how can you find out if a PC is performing as expected without opening the box? Not to mention that it's a joke to put a PC with nVidia 6150se in the Gaming section of a store in 2010...

This should probably be in consumer issues, as far as I know it's your friends mistake the store is under no obligation to take it back, especially when it's not in a saleable condition. As for how your friend was supposed to know, they give detailed information on everything including the graphics card, your friend should've done his homework
02.08.2010 20:21 #3
Registered User
Originally posted by Nolimits
This should probably be in consumer issues, as far as I know it's your friends mistake the store is under no obligation to take it back, especially when it's not in a saleable condition. As for how your friend was supposed to know, they give detailed information on everything including the graphics card, your friend should've done his homework


In fairness, the store cannot expect the customers to know everything about the PC components and if they're good or not; it's not like most of the customers are IT experts. The PC was located in the section marked as 'Gaming', so he has assumed that it would be suitable for the games available on the market these days. That was not the case with the model he chose, not with a graphics chipset released 4 years ago. The placement of this PC in that section is misleading for the customers who should be able to rely on the knowledge of the store staff. If I go to a car saloon and buy one from the 'Sports Cars' section, I will naturally expect the car to behave like a sports one, not like a family town mini-van.

Besides, the PC is completely new, he just got it yesterday, it is certainly in 'saleable' condition. And my friend didn't want to simply return it, he just wanted to get a different model.
02.08.2010 20:27 #4
Moderator
Originally posted by Winger_PL
In fairness, the store cannot expect the customers to know everything about the PC components and if they're good or not; it's not like most of the customers are IT experts. The PC was located in the section marked as 'Gaming', so he has assumed that it would be suitable for the games available on the market these days. That was not the case with the model he chose, not with a graphics chipset released 4 years ago. The placement of this PC in that section is misleading for the customers who should be able to rely on the knowledge of the store staff. If I go to a car saloon and buy one from the 'Sports Cars' section, I will naturally expect the car to behave like a sports one, not like a family town mini-van.

Besides, the PC is completely new, he just got it yesterday, it is certainly in 'saleable' condition. And my friend didn't want to simply return it, he just wanted to get a different model.


There is no defined meaning when computers are sold as gaming machines. It can game, simple as that. Unless he was specifically told that it could play all the recent games there's nothing he can do tbh. It was up to him to make sure the computer met his requirements. The shop hasn't done anything wrong.
02.08.2010 22:03 #5
Registered User
Originally posted by Winger_PL
In fairness, the store cannot expect the customers to know everything about the PC components and if they're good or not; it's not like most of the customers are IT experts. The PC was located in the section marked as 'Gaming', so he has assumed that it would be suitable for the games available on the market these days. That was not the case with the model he chose, not with a graphics chipset released 4 years ago. The placement of this PC in that section is misleading for the customers who should be able to rely on the knowledge of the store staff. If I go to a car saloon and buy one from the 'Sports Cars' section, I will naturally expect the car to behave like a sports one, not like a family town mini-van.

Besides, the PC is completely new, he just got it yesterday, it is certainly in 'saleable' condition. And my friend didn't want to simply return it, he just wanted to get a different model.


If its been taken out of the box and used it's not in saleable condition at least not at full price. It would have been nice if the staff pointed out it was using an old graphics card but the onus is on the person buying it to make sure it's what they want. You might get lucky and Currys agree to help you out but as far as I know they are under no obligation. When buying something like that (or a car as you mentioned it) it's always best to go with someone you know that knows alot about it.
03.08.2010 09:42 #6
The great difficulty we have in this situation is that the product has been used. What we can't practically do here is to take the product back and immediately re-sell it at a discount. What we would have to do is take the product back and ship it off to be wiped back to its original state. That's where it gets problematic and too costly. Is there not a solution here where the OP can pop back to the store, explain his predicament to the store manager and we'll try to do a good turn with a deal on more powerful graphics. We'd have the people in store to fit it. It would cost but hopefully not a huge amount.
03.08.2010 11:34 #7
Registered User
Thanks to everyone for the answers, I'll pass them on to my friend. He'll be probably getting a separate video card for the PC he got, as he doesn't have much of a choice here. I understand that the OS would have to be reformatted / box resealed etc and this is a HP branded machine, so that would be difficult for PC World.

Still, I don't think that a PC so weak should be placed in that section of the store. I'll be driving to work in a few minutes and out of curiosity will drop by the Liffey Valley PC World to look at the setup and the offer.
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