HIB Registered User
#31

Another Simon Singh one. "Fermat's Last Theorem". A very good read. Simply explained but really gets you thinking as well.

eightyfish Registered User
#32

Shabadu said:
Bill Bryson : A Short History of Nearly Everything


Really loved this book. Read it in a week sitting out in the sun back when we had summers. Catalysed an interest in science that led to going back to college to get a science degree!

Thomas_S_Hunterson Closed Account
#33

Godel, Escher, Bach by Douglas Hofstadter is a must-read for anyone interested in philosophy and/or maths.
link

HIB
Another Simon Singh one. "Fermat's Last Theorem". A very good read. Simply explained but really gets you thinking as well.

I found this far too light on mathematical or scientific content.

astroguy Registered User
#34

I would highly recommend "The Human Mind", by Robert Winston. It's like a short history of human thought on psychology, neuroscience, etc, with loads of interesting examples. I'd also recommend "Human Instinct", by the same author. It covers evolutionary psychology and is a very interesting introduction.

chakotha Registered User
#35

marco_polo said:
The Fabric of the Cosmos by Brian Greene is a pretty good introduction to physics for the non scentific minded.


Have just ordered this today - it looks good from the reviews.

Surely your Joking Mr Feynman is a good read.

Also The Whole Shebang: A State-of-the-Universe(s) Report by Timothy Ferris.

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magneticimpulse Registered User
#36

ArthurDent said:
Agree totally with this - anyone that goes off to teach in Brazil mainly to learn the the drums is fine by me.

Would also recommend anything by Primo Levi - chemist and concentration Camp survivor , books aren't very "science" but very interesting none the less


yeah i have his book - the periodic table

magneticimpulse Registered User
#37

chakotha said:
Have just ordered this today - it looks good from the reviews.

Surely your Joking Mr Feynman is a good read.

Also The Whole Shebang: A State-of-the-Universe(s) Report by Timothy Ferris.



i never read the fabric of the cosmos myself, but bought it for a boyfriend one time. he wasnt too impressed, wanted fiction instead. i did try to read it, but it does go into alot of detail.

mcrdotcom Registered User
#38

nesf said:


"In Search of Schroedinger's Kittens"/"In search of Schroedinger's Cat" - John Gribbon.


I havnt read it but I love the first title!

thayes93 Registered User
#39

magicbastarder said:
for more on feynman, james gleick's biography of him, genius is one of the best biographies i've ever read.


I couldn't agree more =]

conorstuff Registered User
#40

The Code Book is one of my favourite popular science books. Then probably Dr. Riemann's Zeroes, or Big Bang.

FarmerGreen Registered User
#41

The snappily titled
'Atomic energy for military purposes; the official report on the development of the atomic bomb under the auspices of the United States Government, 1940-1945'

http://www.archive.org/details/atomicenergyform00smytrich

mickydcork Registered User
#42

'The Big Bang' by Simon Singh is excellent.

mickydcork Registered User
#43

'The Making of the Atomic Bomb' is fascinating, but it's a hefty read

mickydcork Registered User
#44

'Fabric of The Cosmos' by Brian Greene

mickydcork Registered User
#45

'Cosmos' by Carl Sagan is superb

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