Matt Simis Registered User
#31

One of my cars is old enough to run on R12 refrigerant, what options do I have for a recharge?

PS: Halfords recharge cans cost EUR44 but with a EUR10 cash back so its just EUR34. Not quite getting the negativity towards such a cheap,effective solution and by far the most convenient solution.
The last guy I payed to do the job "professionally" charged EUR100 (based in Kilcock) to vacuum and fill it. However he didnt think the system was working so he removed the gas and charged me EUR20 for his time. As it turns out it was working fine, however it was -5 outside at the time and the system was coming on as it didnt need to. I filled it with a gas canister from Halfords and it was perfect.

keithclancy Registered User
#32

Anything to do with gas/pipes including the plumbing in the house is something I wouldn't touch myself.

For the sake of 100 euros and the cost to repair Airco if it goes wrong I think its worth the money.

Plus you can find it for 50 quid if you look around.

Anan1 Registered User
#33

Matt Simis said:
One of my cars is old enough to run on R12 refrigerant, what options do I have for a recharge?
I'd say you're looking at the likes of John Kenealy for the older stuff. He once recharged a system that used freon for me.

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SilverBell Registered User
#34

Matt Simis said:
One of my cars is old enough to run on R12 refrigerant, what options do I have for a recharge?

PS: Halfords recharge cans cost EUR44 but with a EUR10 cash back so its just EUR34. Not quite getting the negativity towards such a cheap,effective solution and by far the most convenient solution.
The last guy I payed to do the job "professionally" charged EUR100 (based in Kilcock) to vacuum and fill it. However he didnt think the system was working so he removed the gas and charged me EUR20 for his time. As it turns out it was working fine, however it was -5 outside at the time and the system was coming on as it didnt need to. I filled it with a gas canister from Halfords and it was perfect.


If you have an R12 system, I think you may not be able to use R134a due to seal incompatibility. (I remember that from a few old Hiluxes we used to work on)

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SilverBell Registered User
#35

CiniO said:
If system is tight, then it lasts forever.
Same as your fridge.

A lot of car compressors have a shaft seal that wears with time, hence the refrigerant will eventually find a way out. Most fridges are welded/soldered shut as in canned motors/compressor units, they wont leak.

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keithclancy Registered User
#36

SilverBell said:
A lot of car compressors have a shaft seal that wears with time, hence the refrigerant will eventually find a way out. Most fridges are welded/soldered shut as in canned motors/compressor units, they wont leak.


Exactly, the difference is that theres vibration in a car so if you had everything soldered and inflexible it would eventually suffer from fatigue.

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Matt Simis Registered User
#37

SilverBell said:
If you have an R12 system, I think you may not be able to use R134a due to seal incompatibility. (I remember that from a few old Hiluxes we used to work on)

Yes, that was the question on sourcing R12 specifically! You cannot mix them anyhow as one is synthetic and the other mineral.

SilverBell Registered User
#38

Matt Simis said:
Yes, that was the question on sourcing R12 specifically! You cannot mix them anyhow as one is synthetic and the other mineral.


Its hard to get R12. It might even be banned, but there are exceptions, certainly from an industrial point its phased out big time.
The refrigerants themselves are both of a similar family (both fairly chemical and synthetic). Maybe its the oils your are thinking on?

R134 can be retrofitted to an R12 system, but you have to replace the comp seals, the comp oil and maybe even hoses!

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Matt Simis Registered User
#39

SilverBell said:
Its hard to get R12. It might even be banned, but there are exceptions, certainly from an industrial point its phased out big time.
The refrigerants themselves are both of a similar family (both fairly chemical and synthetic). Maybe its the oils your are thinking on?

Yeah it is the oils used Im thinking of. From looking it up, it appears the easiest conversion is R-414A which is a drop in replacement. Alternatively R-409a blend is possible but needs a filter change.

As you mention R-134 could require a whole host of other changes.

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