deise go deo Closed Account
#16

nowayjosie said:
guys is there nothing for me to join in Clonmel - I really want to learn to speak read and write my Irish Language - there has to be someone in the know to give me a bit of guidance - Is there any fluent Irish speakers out there who would like to start a group up maybe - I'd be happy to help??????



I know there was a Ciorcal Comhrá in Clonmel a few years ago in the Common Thread café on Parnell Street, don't know if its still there.

A bordsie called imbroglio put me on to it, maybe they can help you.

Other than that, you could get in touch with the Gaelcholaiste on the Mall, they should know whats going on ó taobh na Gaeilge locally.

nowayjosie Registered User
#17

deise go deo said:
I know there was a Ciorcal Comhrá in Clonmel a few years ago in the Common Thread café on Parnell Street, don't know if its still there.

A bordsie called imbroglio put me on to it, maybe they can help you.

Other than that, you could get in touch with the Gaelcholaiste on the Mall, they should know whats going on ó taobh na Gaeilge locally.


Brilliant I will follow up on both and see what the story is thanks a mill

soballach Registered User
#18

I'm lucky enough to be a native speaker, and absolutely love what Bernard Dunne's Bród Club has been doing to get those of us who aren't fluent to use what we have. I use the language daily. I think that digging out our Gaeilge archive is an important step in building a foundation on which to improve your teanga. I know as a native speaker I should probably cringe at the leath Béarla leath Gaeilge that Bernard uses, but I don't, I think he's hit the nail on the head. Have any of you signed-up to Bród Club on the RTÉ site? What are the language resources like there? Also, posted on the Facebook page is a link to the forums. Has anybody used these to improve their Gaeilge?

dlofnep Closed Account
#19

I'm pretty much the same as Déise go Deo. I'm involved in a conversational group, and just picked up my ability to speak from that. I don't take any formal lessons, but I should really invest in a grammar book to understand the grammatical aspects of it soon. I can speak fairly comfortably in Irish, and think conversational groups or any other medium of immersion is the best way to get you speaking comfortably at a decent level than any other way.

reganovich Registered User
#20

I'm keen to learn Irish now as well..dunno if brod club has had a subconscious effect as I'm thinking about it more and more lately.

Been listening alot to R na life as well but mainly because the music is unreal!

So, if truth be told I dont want a formal approach, I want to try and improve my conversational Irish in an informal way..any begginers conversational groups out there?

Sorry, but the thoughts of learning the grammar etc is just such a turn off..reminds me too much of school..aim is to pick it up speaking if possible

Who remembers the "lion na bearnai" exercises?
The way irish is taught

garbanzo Registered User
#21

Mise freisin.

deise go deo Closed Account
#22

reganovich said:

Who remembers the "lion na bearnai" exercises?
The way irish is taught



I do, got the t-shirt and everything

http://gaelshirt.spreadshirt.ie/lion-na-bearnai-A9423551/customize/color/2

pog it Registered User
#23

reganovich said:
I'm keen to learn Irish now as well..dunno if brod club has had a subconscious effect as I'm thinking about it more and more lately.

Been listening alot to R na life as well but mainly because the music is unreal!

So, if truth be told I dont want a formal approach, I want to try and improve my conversational Irish in an informal way..any begginers conversational groups out there?

Sorry, but the thoughts of learning the grammar etc is just such a turn off..reminds me too much of school..aim is to pick it up speaking if possible

Who remembers the "lion na bearnai" exercises?
The way irish is taught


I'm not being confrontational here but this thread was for people already well into learning Irish, not for those thinking about learning it again. There are loads of threads for beginners, that's why I set this one up for those who are already serious about it and who have already put some effort in.

reganovich Registered User
#24

pog it said:
I'm not being confrontational here but this thread was for people already well into learning Irish, not for those thinking about learning it again. There are loads of threads for beginners, that's why I set this one up for those who are already serious about it and who have already put some effort in.


Sorry man, just asking

dlofnep Closed Account
#25

Anyone have any grammar book reccomendations?

Enkidu Registered User
#26

dlofnep said:
Anyone have any grammar book reccomendations?

Well Nollaig Mac Congáil has a pretty good book with it "all in one place" which is "Irish Grammar Book". You can get it in Irish or English.

I always recommend the following website:
http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/gram.htm
It's the most complete grammar there is practically.

I've also a file on the grammar of Munster Irish, which is very short. All the major rules over just about eight pages, taken from a book from the 70s (Copyright has been relinquished).

2 people have thanked this post
keepkeyyellow Registered User
#27

Enkidu said:

I've also a file on the grammar of Munster Irish, which is very short. All the major rules over just about eight pages, taken from a book from the 70s (Copyright has been relinquished).


Would you be able to send it to me if I send you my email in a PM? I much prefer Munster Irish personally


I'm not putting a good effort in at the moment since I've exams coming up, and I study French so I don't want to muddle the two up but me and a friend have agreed to have weekly meet ups to improve our Irish and maybe get some others in on it too and when college starts I'm going to sign up to the free classes from the Irish Department

Personally I'd recommend the workbook 'Is Feidir Liom' and Marino have two very practical pdfs on the language to download here http://www.ilrweb.ie/ILR_ABHARFOGHLAMA.html

dlofnep Closed Account
#28

If you could send it onto me, I'd be greatful.

pog it Registered User
#29

Another good grammar book is by Ciarán MacMurchaidh but it's all in Irish. Found it brilliant for learning about the genitive and prepositions. Nollaig MacCongail's book also does a good job of the prepositions and the direct and indirect clauses so shoot me now but I reckon you will need both at some stage!

pog it Registered User
#30

reganovich said:
Sorry man, just asking


I know and I'm sorry for being tetchy about it but I just wanted to be straight about it.

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